One Story

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One Story
One Story (magazine) cover tiger.jpg
Issue #150 cover
"Tiger" by Nalini Jones
EditorPatrick Ryan
CategoriesLiterature
Frequency12 per year
PublisherMaribeth Batcha
First issueApril 2002
CompanyOne Story, Inc.
CountryUnited States
Based inBrooklyn, New York
LanguageEnglish
Websiteone-story.com
ISSN1544-7340

One Story is a literary magazine which publishes 12 issues a year, each issue containing a single short story. The magazine was founded in 2002[1] by writers Hannah Tinti and Maribeth Batcha. [2] "Villanova" by John Hodgman was the first short story published by One Story.[3][4]

Contributors[edit]

The authors published in the magazine include the following:

Editors[edit]

Tinti received the PEN/Nora Magid Award for Magazine Editing in 2009.

Evolution[edit]

Originally, One Story intended to publish eighteen times a year though it occasionally fell short of that number. They began publishing twelve times a year in 2017 after publishing only eleven the year before.

Other Awards[edit]

Stories published in One Story have appeared in The Best American Short Stories and the O. Henry Prize anthology.

One Teen Story[edit]

In 2012, One Story launched a companion publication aimed at a teenaged audience.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Zachary Petit (May 12, 2010). "12 Literary Journals Your Future Agent is Reading". Writer's Digest. Retrieved December 4, 2015.
  2. ^ Smith, Dinitia. They offer up to $500 and 25 consumer copies of your story if your short story is accepted. They are continually searching for short stories that are strong enough to stand alone, and yet leave the reader satisfied. They receive over 100 entries a week. After submitting, it takes 8-12 weeks to be reviewed. "A Little Start-Up Entertains, One Story at a Time", The New York Times, March 23, 2004. Retrieved March 18, 2008.
  3. ^ ""Villanova or: How I Became a Former Professional Literary Agent" by John Hodgman". One Story. 1 April 2002. Retrieved 26 August 2015.
  4. ^ Travis Kurowski (1 May 2014). "Literary MagNet". Poets & Writers. Retrieved 26 August 2015.