OONI

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Open Observatory of Network Interference (OONI)
OONI-HorizontalColor.svg
Formation2012; 9 years ago (2012)
TypeNon-governmental organization
Websiteooni.org

The Open Observatory of Network Interference (OONI) is a project that monitors internet censorship globally.[1] It relies on volunteers to run software that detects blocking and reports the findings to the organization.[2] As of October 2019, OONI has analyzed 292 million network connections in 233 countries.[3]

Development[edit]

OONI was officially launched in 2012 as a free software project under The Tor Project, aiming to study and showcase global internet censorship. In 2017, OONI launched OONI Probe,[4] a mobile app that runs a series of network measurements. These measurements detects blocked websites, apps, and other tools in addition to the presence of middleboxes.[5][6] Results of these tests can be utilized through the OONI Explorer and API. [7]

Tests[edit]

Screenshot of OONI probe app stating a website might have been blocked by means of TCP/IP based blocking.

The current tests deployed by OONI are as follows:


Notable cases[edit]

OONI has confirmed data analyzing the 2019 Internet blackout in Iran.[9] On 24 February 2019, Cuban independent news outlet Tremenda Nota confirmed the blocking of its website a few hours before a referendum in Cuba. A new Constitution was voted in the country for the first time in decades. OONI network measurement data confirmed the blocking of the site along with several other independent media websites during the referendum.[10] The network had previously confirmed 41 websites blocked in the country in 2017.[11][12] Cases of internet censorship and network disruptions during elections have also been detected in Benin,[13] Zambia,[14] and Togo.[15] In May 2019, OONI reported that the Chinese Government blocked all language editions of Wikipedia.[16][17]

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Open Observatory of Network Interference". ooni.org. Retrieved 2 June 2019. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. ^ Giles, Martin. "Online censorship in Saudi Arabia soared after Jamal Khashoggi's murder". technologyreview.com. Retrieved 12 June 2019. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  3. ^ "OONI Explorer". explorer.ooni.org. Retrieved 18 October 2019. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  4. ^ "OONI Probe install page". ooni.org. Retrieved 17 October 2019. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  5. ^ Larson, Selena. "New app helps people track internet censorship". money.cnn.com. Retrieved 12 June 2019. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  6. ^ "About". ooni.org. Retrieved 2 June 2019. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  7. ^ "OONI Data".
  8. ^ "OONI Test".
  9. ^ "Iran's nation-wide Internet blackout: Measurement data and technical observations".
  10. ^ "Cuba blocks independent media amid 2019 constitutional referendum". ooni.org. Retrieved 12 June 2019. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  11. ^ Matsakis, Louise. "Here Are the 41 Websites You Can't Access in Cuba". vice.com. Retrieved 12 June 2019. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  12. ^ "Measuring Internet Censorship in Cuba's ParkNets". ooni.org. Retrieved 12 June 2019. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  13. ^ "Benin: Social media blocking and Internet blackout amid 2019 elections". ooni.org. Retrieved 12 June 2019. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  14. ^ "Zambia: Internet censorship during the 2016 general elections?". ooni.org. Retrieved 12 June 2019. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  15. ^ "Togo: Instant messaging apps blocked amid 2020 presidential election".
  16. ^ LEUNG, HILLARY. "Wikipedia Is Now Banned in China in All Languages". Retrieved 11 June 2019. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  17. ^ "China is now blocking all language editions of Wikipedia". ooni.org. Retrieved 11 June 2019. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)