This is a good article. Click here for more information.

Operation Zarb-e-Azb

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Operation Zarb-e-Azb
Part of the War in North-West Pakistan and
the Global War on Terrorism
Pakistan NWFP FATA NORTH WAZIRISTAN.svg
  •  North Waziristan
  •  FATA
  •  Khyber Pakhtunkhwa
Date 15 June 2014 – present
(1 year, 1 month, 2 weeks and 3 days)
Location Pakistan
Status

Ongoing

  • 90% of North Waziristan cleared (as of November 2014)[17]
Belligerents

Pakistan Islamic Republic of Pakistan

Supported by:
 United States of America

Insurgent groups

Formerly:

 Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant[14]

Formerly:

Commanders and leaders

Pakistan
Mamnoon Hussain
(President)
Nawaz Sharif
(Prime Minister)
Rashad Mahmood
(Chairman joint chiefs)
Raheel Sharif
(Chief of Army Staff)
Muhammad Zaka[18]
(Chief of Naval Staff)
Sohail Aman
(Chief of Air Staff)

Commander of Operation Zarb-e-Azb

Major-General Zafar Khan[19]

Insurgent groups Maulana Fazlullah
Sheikh Khalid Haqqani
Sheharyar Mehsud
Adnan Rashid
Usman Ghazi (Until 13 March 2015)[13][20]

Adnan el-Shukrijumah 

Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi (Leader of ISIL)
Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant Abu Alaa Afri 
(Deputy Leader of ISIL)[21][22]
Khorasan province logo.jpeg Hafiz Saeed Khan  [23] (ISIL Emir of Afghanistan and Pakistan)
Khorasan province logo.jpeg Abdul Rahim Muslim Dost (Top Wilayat Khorasan commander)[24][25]

Khorasan province logo.jpeg Usman Ghazi[13][26]
Strength

Pakistan

United States

Several thousand Several thousand
Casualties and losses

347 killed[29][30][31]

943 (injured + killed) including 38 limb loss, 42 vision lost [32]

In Pakistani offensive:
2,763 killed (as of 14 June 2015)[29][30]
1000+ arrested


In American drone strikes:
165+ killed (as of 2 June 2015)
4+ killed[23]
2 civilians killed, 1 injured[33][34]
140 civilians (mostly children) killed in TTP retaliation
929,859 IDPs registered (as of 14 July 2014)[35]

Operation Zarb-e-Azb (Urdu: آپریشن ضربِ عضبALA-LC: Āpres̱ẖan Ẓarb-i ʿAẓb pronounced [ɑːpreːʃən zərb-e əzb]) is a joint military offensive being conducted by the Pakistan Armed Forces against various militant groups, including the Tehrik-i-Taliban Pakistan (TTP), the Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan, the East Turkestan Islamic Movement, Lashkar-e-Jhangvi, al-Qaeda, Jundallah and the Haqqani network.[7] The operation was launched on 15 June 2014 in North Waziristan along the Pakistan-Afghanistan border as a renewed effort against militancy in the wake of the 8 June attack on Jinnah International Airport in Karachi, for which the TTP and the IMU claimed responsibility.[36][37] Part of the ongoing war in North-West Pakistan, up to 30,000 Pakistani soldiers are involved in Zarb-e-Azb, described as a "comprehensive operation" to flush out all foreign and local militants hiding in North Waziristan.[38] The operation has received widespread support from the Pakistani political, defence and civilian sectors. As a consequence, overall security situation improved and terrorist attacks in Pakistan dropped to a six year low since 2008.[39]

Etymologies[edit]

Zarb-e-Azb (Urdu: ضربِ عضبALA-LC: Ẓarb-i ʿAẓb pronounced [zərb-e əzb]) means "sharp and cutting strike".[40] Azb also refers to the sword owned by the Islamic prophet Muhammad, which he used in the battles of Badr and Uhud.[41]

Background[edit]

Peace negotiations[edit]

Peace negotiations with the Taliban were announced by Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif after his election,[42] although previous attempts to engage TTP in dialogue had failed. The first session of talks, between committees appointed by the Pakistani Government and the Taliban, was held on 26 March 2014 at Khyber Pakhtunkhwa House in Islamabad.[43] The Taliban did not name representatives from their ranks, instead nominating pro-Taliban religious figures to present their views.[42] The terrorists called for the implementation of Sharia in Pakistan; the Government of Pakistan demanded the cessation of hostilities, insisting that talks be held within the framework of the Pakistani constitution.[42] A month-long ceasefire was reached on 1 March 2014.[44]

Besides the meetings at Khyber Pakhtunkhwa House, negotiations also involved helicopter travel by government representatives to the areas under militant control near the Pakistan-Afghanistan border. The government had indicated that stronger military action would be implemented if the talks failed.[43]

Failure[edit]

Negotiations collapsed after the execution of 23 Pakistani Frontier Corps soldiers by the Taliban on 17 February 2014.[45][46] The soldiers had been held by the insurgents since 2010, and on 17 April 2014 the TTP formally ended the ceasefire.[47] Taliban infighting since March 2014 killed more than 90 militants. The strife, triggered by differences between the Mehsud group (led by Sheheryar Mehsud) and another TTP faction (led by Khan Said Sajna), impeded the negotiations.[48] The negotiations were irreversibly damaged by a terrorist attack on Karachi Airport for which the Taliban claimed responsibility and which killed 28 people (including security personnel).[49][50] A Pakistani military official was quoted to have said, "The army is ready for an operation. It now all depends on the government to make a decision."[51]

Jinnah Airport attack[edit]

The operation began one week after a terrorist attack on Pakistan's busiest airport. On 8 June 2014, 10 militants from the the Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan and TTP attacked Jinnah International Airport, Karachi, killing 28 people including security personnel and wounding at least 18.[49]

In retaliation, the Pakistani military launched a series of air-strikes targeting terrorist hideouts in the areas bordering Afghanistan. At least 25 militants were killed on 10 June. The figure also included foreign militants killed.[52] Two drone attacks on 12 June killed Uzbek, Afghan and local militants.[53][54] On 15 June the Pakistani military intensified air-strikes and bombed eight foreign militant hideouts, killing as many as 140 militants (most Uzbek, including persons linked to the airport attack and airport attack commander and mastermind Abu Abdur Rehman Almani) in North Waziristan.[55][56]

Preparations[edit]

The Pakistani military had prepared for the operation long before, and the government prepared for a three-front operation:[59] isolating targeted militant groups, obtaining support from the political parties and saving civilians from the backlash of the operation.[59]

Defence Minister Khawaja Asif said that the nation stood by its military: "The decision was taken after the strategy of dialogue failed. The operation will continue until it reaches its logical conclusion. Any group that challenges Pakistan's constitution, attacks civilians, soldiers, and government installations and uses Pakistani territory to plan terrorist attacks will be targeted". Asif added that internally displaced persons would be assisted by the federal and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa governments: "We will try to ensure that the displaced do not have to stay away from their homes for too long."[60]

The combat troops encircled militant bases in the towns of Mirali and Miranshah. Pakistani officials said that the Afghan's National Security Forces (ANSF) were requested to seal the border on their side so that militants do not escape.[61] The operation involved the Air Force, Navy artillery, tanks and ground troops. According to a military statement, "On the directions of the government, armed forces of Pakistan have launched a comprehensive operation against foreign and local terrorists who are hiding in sanctuaries in North Waziristan."[61] An official with the military said that between 14,000 and 20,000 soldiers were normally stationed in North Waziristan before the operation, and he expected the offensive to require no more than a total of 30,000 troops.[28]

Timeline[edit]

For complete timeline, see Timeline of Operation Zarb-e-Azb.

2015[edit]

January[edit]

7 January 2015
Twelve militants were killed as gunship helicopters targeted militant hideouts in Datta Khel. In the air-strikes, four militant hideouts and seven vehicles were also destroyed.[62]
16 January 2015
Director General Inter Services Public Relations (ISPR) Major General Asim Saleem Bajwa said security forces have killed 2,000 militants in North Waziristan so far. Bajwa added that 200 soldiers had been killed during the Operation Zarb-e-Azb and 800 others were injured.[63]
25 January 2015
35 militants, including foreigners, were killed in air strikes targeting militant hideouts in Datta Khel.[64]
27 January 2015
76 militants including foreigners were killed in the Pakistani air-strikes targeting militant hideouts in Datta Khel area of North Waziristan. 53 militants were killed in the first round and 23 militants were killed in the second round of the air-strikes. Six militant hideouts and an ammunition dump was destroyed.[65]

February[edit]

20 February 2015
A Pakistan Army Major Zahid Shaheed was killed in Datta Khel with a sniper rifle. In Pakistani retaliation, 5 terrorists were killed.[66]

April[edit]

22 April 2015
At least 35 militants were killed in aerial strikes in South Waziristan and Datta Khel area of North Waziristan, according to ISPR.[67]

May[edit]

22 May 2015
Four Pakistani soldiers were killed and two others were injured in Dattakhel area of North Waziristan Agency at night after their vehicle was targeted by an improvised explosive device. In Pakistani counter-retaliation, the military launched a search-operation killing seven militants in the pursuing fire-exchange.[68]

June[edit]

28 June 2015
23 militants were killed in the Pakistani military air-strikes in the North Waziristan and Khyber agencies. Foreign militants were also among those killed in strikes which also targeted ammunition dumps.[69]

July[edit]

5 July 2015
Seven Pakistani soldiers were killed in the Taliban attaks in North and South Waziristan. in Pir Ghr, Taliban attacked a Pakistani military convoy and killed two soldiers and wounded another three. Another two remote-controlled bomb attacks targeting military vehicles in North Waziristan and South Waziristan killed five soldiers and injured six. According to the Pakistani intelligence officials, the Pakistani military was facing fierce resistance in the final push towards Shawal valley.[70] In the pursuing fire-exchange and military's retaliation, 12 militants were killed in Datta Khel in the North Waziristan agency.[71][72]
7 July 2015
A Pakistani soldier was killed in Taliban attack on an army bunker in the South Waziristan agency.[73]

American drone strikes[edit]

Drone strikes, which were halted for six months at the request of the Pakistani government, resumed for the operation. The following drone strikes took place during the operation:[74]

In 2014[edit]

  • 11 June 2014 – Two strikes in Miramshah killed 16 suspected militants and injured several others. These were the first drone strikes of 2014; the previous strike occurred on 25 December 2013 in the Qutab Khel area of Miramshah, killing four suspected militants.[74]
  • 18 June 2014 – At least six militants were killed in Miramshah.[74]
  • 10 July 2014 – A strike in the Datta Khel area killed seven militants and injured three others.[74]
  • 16 July 2014 - Four missiles were fired in a strike in the tehsil of Datta Khel, two on a house and two on a vehicle, killing twenty militants and injuring five.[74]
  • 19 July 2014 - Eleven militants, including two commanders, were killed in the tehsil of Madakhel, Data Khel, North Waziristan. Most of the militants belonged to the Punjabi faction of the Taliban.[75]
  • 6 August 2014 - A strike in Datta Khel killed six militants and injured two others.[76]
  • 24 Sept 2014: At least 8 people including Uzbek Militants were reportedly killed in a US drone strike Dattakhel tehsil of North Waziristan.[77]
  • 5 October 2014: At least 5 suspected militants were killed in a US drone strike in Shawal area of South Waziristan tribal region.[78]
  • 6 October 2014: At least 8 suspected militant were killed and several other injured in a U.S drone strike in Shawal district of North Waziristan.[79]
  • 7 October 2014: At least 3 suspected militants were killed in a U.S drone strike in North Waziristan region.[80]
  • 30 October 2014: A US drone strike killed at least 4, injuring several others in Birmal Tehsil of South Waziristan.[81]
  • 11 November 2014: A US drone strike in Doa Toi area of Datakhel tehsil in North Waziristan Agency killed 4 suspected militants.[82]
  • 21 November 2014:Reportedly Five suspected militants including two commander of 'Qaedat al-Jihad in the sub-continent’, a newly established branch of Al Qaeda were killed in a US Drone strike in Datakhel region of North Waziristan Agency.[83]
  • 6 December 2014: A US drone strike killed a key Al Qaeda leader Umar Farooq along with four others in Datakhel region of North Waziristan Agency.[84]
  • 26 December 2014: Two separate US Drone strikes in the Kund and Mangroti area of Shawal in North Waziristan Agency killed at least 7 suspected militants.[85]

In 2015[edit]

  • 4 January 2015: A reportedly high value unidentified Uzbek commander of Taliban's Gul Bahadur group was killed along with 8 others by a US drone strike in Shawal area of North Waziristan Agency.[86]
  • 15 January 2015: A US drone strike reportedly killed 7 suspected militants in Wacha Dara area of Liddah Tehsil of South Waziristan Agency.[87]
  • 19 January 2015: A US drone strike killed 6 while injuring 4 others in the ShahiKhel area of North Waziristan's Shawwal tehsil.[88]
  • 28 January 2015: A US drone strike killed 7 while injuring another militant in the Shawal area of North Waziristan.[89]
  • 18 March 2015: A US drone strike killed a TTP commander Khawrey Mehsud along with 3 others in Shabak area of Kurram Agency.[90]
  • 12 April 2015: A U.S drone strike killed 4 suspected militants in North Waziristan.[91]
  • 16 May 2015: A drone strike Killed 7 to 13 militants in the Mana area of North Waziristan Agency.[92][93]
  • 18 May 2015: A U.S. drone strike killed 6 suspected militants in Zoye Narye Area of North Waziristan.[94]
  • 2 June 2015: Four suspected militants were killed in a drone strike targeting a vehicle in the Shawal area of North Waziristan.[95]
  • 6 June 2015: At least nine suspected militants were killed in a strike in Shawal’s Zoya Saidgai area, considered to be a hideout of the Afghan Taliban.[96][97]

Yearly Progress[edit]

External video
Zarb-i-Azb: In patriotic video, ISPR salutes soldiers as saviours
Farhan Saeed pays tribute to Pakistan Army in latest music video

On 13 June 2015, the Pakistani military reported progress in the operation in the course of a year. DG ISPR Asim Saleem Bajwa reported that 2,763 militants had been killed so far, including 218 terrorist commanders in 9,000 intelligence based operations (IBOs). "Some 837 hideouts of terrorists have been destroyed and 253 tonnes of explosives recovered so far during the operation", he said. The Army also recovered 18,087 weapons, including heavy machine guns, light machine guns, sniper rifles, rocket launchers and AK-47s . Bajwa said that thousands of terrorists were also arrested, their strongholds cleared and their communication infrastructure destroyed. "347 officers and soldiers of Pakistan Armed Forces have embraced martyrdom", he added.[98][99] The year 2015 was declared to be "a year of victory" and the operation itself a "manifestation of the resolve to root out terrorism in the country" by the Pakistani Defence Minister Khawaja Asif.[100]

Final phase[edit]

In June 2015, it was reported that the Pakistani military was making preliminary preparations for the final phase of the operation. "Preliminary preparations for the final push have started, which will begin next month," a military official told media. The final phase will be focused in the areas south of Dattakhel towards the Afghan border through the mountainous and forested Shawal Valley, where a large number of militants are believed to have taken refuge after fleeing the operation in other parts of North Waziristan. "Operation Zarb-e-Azab moves to last few pockets close to Pak-Afghan border," military spokesman DG ISPR Asim Bajwa said.[102][103] In July, the Pakistan Army Chief, General Raheel Sharif visited the military's forward-most positions near the Afghan border in North Waziristan[101] He was briefed about the progress and future plans about the Operation Zarb-e-Azb and also met the Pakistani troops stationed there. Sharif also visited South Waziristan and Wana agencies. It was reported that the Pakistani military had just completed the preliminary prepatrations for final phase. In the area around Shawal, peaks were cleared.[101]

Management of displaced civilians[edit]

As a result of the operation, 929,859 displaced civilians (from 80,302 families) were registered by Pakistani authorities as of 14 July.[35] Financial support, relief goods and food packages were being distributed[104][105] and 59 donation points were established across Pakistan by the army.[106]

On 10 July, the Foreign Office of Pakistan said that the rehabilitation of internally displaced persons was an internal matter and reiterated that Pakistan had not requested international assistance. "We have very clear instructions from the prime minister [to not seek external assistance], Pakistan has neither made nor intends to make a request for international assistance. It has been made very clear that all expenditure related to temporarily displaced Pakistanis will be met from our own resources", Pakistani Foreign Office spokesperson Tasnim Aslam said.[107] However, it was reported that the United States allocated $31 million for IDPs[104] and an additional $9.3 million for health, hygiene, water and sanitation for IDPs and livestock.[108] It was also reported that the United Arab Emirates government allocated $20.5 million in IDP humanitarian aid.[104] In February 2014, the Pakistani Finance Minister Ishaq Dar told a visiting US Senator Jack Reed that the cost of the operation so far had reached 40 billion (US$390 million) and could go as high as 130 billion (US$1.3 billion).[109]

Return of the IDPs[edit]

On 8 December 2014, the military approved the phased repatriation of the IDPs. The Pakistani army chief said the early return of the IDPs was his top priority. According to senior military officials, civilian authorities were directed to plan the return of the IDPs to their homes in areas which have been cleared of terrorists.[110] On 31 March 2015, the repatriation started. On the first day, 219 IDPs belonging to 62 families left Bannu for Spinwam and Shahmeri in North Waziristan. In the first phase till 24 April, about 1,200 families were to return to their homes in Sinwam, Shamiri, Mirali and Bubali areas of NWA. Each family was given 25000 (US$250) as cash assistance and 10000 (US$98) as transportation expenses at Mirzail. Food ration for six months and non-food items would also be given to each household. For effective disease control, children under five years of age were administered anti-polio vaccines and under 10 years of age were administered anti-measles vaccines.[111] As of 4 May 2015, only 230 displaced families had returned since the launch of the repatriation programme. "The civil administration can send entire displaced population back to their homes within a month if the area is de-notified as conflict zone," said an official dealing with IDPs repatriation. According to the official sources, the cut-off date for the return of IDPs was December 2016.[112]

Reaction[edit]

Domestic[edit]

Social media[edit]

The decision by the Pakistani military to launch a comprehensive operation was widely supported, with journalists, opinion-makers, politicians and other social-media users commending the operation.[113]

Pakistan Tehrik-e-Insaf[edit]

PTI chairman Imran Khan endorsed the military operation in North Waziristan as it became clear that the Taliban were not seriously negotiating.[114] A week before, reiterating his party's stance on peace talks with militants, Imran said that an offensive in North Waziristan would unite militant forces against the Pakistani state. "Conducting such a military operation when most of the groups in NWA want talks is suicidal," Imran said in a statement, adding that most groups in North Waziristan desired peace talks with the government.[115] The PTI position changed as it became clear that negotiations were fruitless.[115]

Jamat-e-Islami[edit]

Jamat-e-Islami (JI), one of Pakistan's leading religious parties, continued to oppose any operation in North Waziristan. JI leader Siraj-ul-Haq urged the government to keep the option of negotiations with the Taliban.[116] He warned that a military operation in North Waziristan would trigger a massive human tragedy, saying that it was the duty of Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif to consider the views of the nation and its leadership (inside and outside Parliament) before making a crucial decision affecting national security.[117]

Muttahida Qaumi Movement[edit]

According to Muttahida Qaumi Movement senator Babar Khan Ghauri, "This is a commendable decision by the government. We have been repeatedly telling the current government that instead of engaging the terrorists in dialogue, government should act against these elements. Karachi has a number of terrorists and it might suffer from a blow back; this should be tackled so Karachi does not have to suffer on account of this."[60] MQM head Altaf Hussain said, "I welcome this operation and I am glad that government is supporting the armed forces, those who have not backed the operation must realize that it is a matter of national security. I appeal to them to come on same page by setting aside their political compulsions." he said.[118][119]

Awami National Party[edit]

Awami National Party (ANP) member Zahid Khan said, "We also held a dialogue previously (during our government) but that did not produce effective results. We wanted peace and we were okay if that came through dialogue but unfortunately that could not happen. This time, knowing from our experience, we had cautioned the government that [the] dialogue approach would not work. Government should have taken the parliament into confidence before launching the operation but it didn't."[60]

Local tribesmen[edit]

North Waziristan tribal elders assured their support for Operation Zarb-e-Azb, according to a statement released by ISPR director-general Major General Asim Bajwa. "Many tribal elders from around Miranshah, Mir Ali, Datta Khel assure support to army operation," Bajwa tweeted. "The tribesmen have assured the army that they would not let the militant to return to the area."[120]

Sunni Ulema Board[edit]

On 22 June 2014, more than 100 Islamic scholars issued a joint fatwa in support of the operation, calling it a jihad: "Crushing of the attempts to disrupt peaceful atmosphere in a Muslim state is jihad".[121]

International[edit]

  •  Afghanistan – Afghan Ambassador to Pakistan Janan Mosazai stated that his government would provide "every possible assistance" to defeat the militants in the operation.[122]
  •  United Arab Emirates – Interior minister Saif bin Zayed Al Nahyan said that his government would co-operate with Pakistan in the war against the extremists.[123]
  •  United Nations – In a statement, the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) estimated that as of 23 June more than 450,000 people were internally displaced from the war-torn region.[124] Other UN agencies, such as the UNHCR, agreed to provide tents and other facilities to the camps.[125] The World Health Organization (WHO) provided medicines and vaccines to the IDPs to avert a polio outbreak.[126]
  •  United States – The US supported military operations against Taliban militants, a spokesman from the US Embassy in Pakistan said on 16 June, and the US supported every Pakistani step taken for the establishment of peace.[127] The United States had pressured Pakistan for a military operation in North Waziristan for years, and the US Congress linked military assistance to Pakistan for the next fiscal year with military operations in North Waziristan in June 2014.[128] Rear Adm. John Kirby, the Pentagon press secretary, said that the Pentagon was unaware of Pakistan's decision to launch a new offensive in North Waziristan: "The Pakistan military and the government understand the threat, and they continue to go after that threat."[28][129] On 5 November 2014, Lt. Gen. Joseph Anderson, a senior commander for US and Nato forces in Afghanistan, said in a Pentagon-hosted video briefing from Afghanistan that the Haqqani network is now "fractured" like the Taliban. "They are fractured. They are fractured like the Taliban is. That's based pretty much on the Pakistan's operations in North Waziristan this entire summer-fall," he said, acknowledging the effectiveness of Pakistan's military offensive. "That has very much disrupted their efforts in Afghanistan and has caused them to be less effective in terms of their ability to pull off an attack in Kabul," Anderson added.[130]
  •  China – Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi said that terrorism was a problem common to China and Pakistan, since militants were the enemy of both countries, adding that China fully supported the operation.[131]
  •  Russia – Chairman of the State Duma Sergey Naryshkin commended the operation, while the Pakistani Army Chief, General Raheel Sharif was on an official visit to Russia. "We will stand by Pakistan in its fight against terrorism and extremism for stability in the region. Our relations are independent, more consistent and will further grow," he added.[132][133][134][135]

TTP retaliation[edit]

Lahore[edit]

On 2 November 2014, a suicide bombing following the daily parade took place at Wagah border in Pakistan, more than 55 killed and over 200 injured.[136] The attack was claimed by militant groups jamaat-ul-Ahrar and jundallah,sub-groups of TTP.

Peshawar[edit]

On 16 December 2014, seven gunmen belonging to the Tehrik-i-Taliban Pakistan (TTP)[137] entered an Army Public School in Pakistani city of Peshawar and opened fire on school staff and children, killing 145 people.[137][138][139][140] The spokesperson of Tehrik-i-Taliban Pakistan, Mohammad Omar Khorasani, took the responsibility for the attack and said it was revenge for Operation Zarb-e-Azb.[141]

State's Counter-retaliation[edit]

Responding to TTP's retaliatory attacks, Pakistan has mounted deadliest counter-retaliation on TTP; first removing the moratorium on executions of terrorists by the Presidential Order, and secondly establishing military courts commissions (roughly based on Gitmo). Pakistani authorities have issued "hang till death" orders to jail superintendents at the nationwide prisons. In weeks, a number of high value detainees convicted on a terrorism charges were hanged.

Since December 2014, Pakistan's intelligence community, law enforcement agencies, antiterrorism forces, and inter-provincial police have been engaged in deadly police encounters in all over the country. News media have been televising the live actions on tracking down the militants and targeting the TTP operatives in series of police encounters. In the afternoon of 20 December, the KP Police and the special agents of the FIA raided a safe house in Shabqadar, a town located in 30 km (19 mi) north of Peshawar. In an exchange of fire at the safe house, the KPK police and the other law enforcement agencies gunned down the six TTP fighters, including their commander and two other high value targets who assisted in the attack.[142] At the night of 20 December, the team of Pakistan Rangers personnel raided a safe house in Manghopir area of Karachi and killed five members of the TTP in a deadly shoot out.[143]

On 22 December 2014, Karachi Police and the CID teams chased down and killed the TTP leader, Abid Muchar,[144] along with his three associates in a police encounter. The same night, another action in took place in Karachi when the CID teams, in a high-speed chase in Hawke's Bay Beach, chased and apprehended five members of al-Qaeda's South Asian chapter who are suspected of planning an attack on a naval dockyard in Karachi in September.

Acting on a MI information, the navy's SSGN teams were inserted in secret hideout in Khyber Agency and stalked the six terrorists led by Saddam Jan— the mastermind of the Army Public School attack— at the midnight of 26 December 2014.[145] In a late night operations, the SSGN combat teams reportedly hunted and killed Jan along with his six militants, while trying to seek sanctuary. An unnamed senior Pakistan government official confirmed the report.[145]

On 9 January 2015, the CID teams gunned down the four al-Qaeda operatives after another high speed chase took place in Qayyumabad in Karachi.[146] In another separate midnight action in Lahore, the teams of FIA's special agents, assisted by the Punjab Police, raided a house located in Burki Road.[147] Lasting almost two-hour gun battle, the FIA teams hunted and gunned down Roohullah (alias: Asadullah)—the mastermind of the Wagah border attack along with three of his associates. Since the attack, the FIA had been on a hunt for Roohullah and was finally killed in a police encounter in Lahore.[147]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ Saleem, Farukh (14 October 2014). "India disappointed by Zarb-e-Azb’s success". The News International, editorial. The News International. Retrieved 17 December 2014. 
  2. ^ "US drones strike in jihadist stronghold in North Waziristan". 
  3. ^ "Pakistan’s new security operation is a humanitarian disaster. The U.S. is partially to blame.". Slate Magazine. 
  4. ^ Khan, Tahir. "Anti-terrorism cooperation: Islamabad asks Kabul to extradite Fazlullah". The Express Tribune. Archived from the original on 30 June 2014. Retrieved 20 June 2014. 
  5. ^ "Securing the "Durand Line"". 
  6. ^ Zahir Shah Sherazi. "Cross-border militant attacks kill four soldiers in Bajaur". 
  7. ^ a b "US commander commends Zarb-e-Azb for disrupting Haqqani network's ability to target Afghanistan". The Express Tribune. 6 November 2014. Retrieved 6 November 2014. 
  8. ^ "Cross-border attack: 7 militants killed as Pak army check post targeted in Lower Dir". The Express Tribune. 30 July 2014. Retrieved 14 August 2014. 
  9. ^ "Volatile frontiers: Attack on border post repulsed". The Express Tribune. 17 September 2014. Archived from the original on 23 September 2014. Retrieved 2 November 2014. 
  10. ^ "Militants attack Pakistani post near Afghan border". Yahoo News. 16 September 2014. 
  11. ^ "Militants attack Pakistani post near Afghan border". Mail Online. 
  12. ^ "3 FC personnel, 11 militants killed in North Waziristan cross-border attack". 
  13. ^ a b c d "Uzbek militants in Afghanistan pledge allegiance to ISIS in beheading video". Retrieved 29 June 2015. 
  14. ^ a b c "ISIS Now Has Military Allies in 11 Countries – NYMag". Daily Intelligencer. Retrieved 25 November 2014. 
  15. ^ "Pakistan Taliban splinter group vows allegiance to Islamic State". Reuters. 18 November 2014. Retrieved 19 November 2014. 
  16. ^ "Pakistani splinter group rejoins Taliban amid fears of isolation". Reuters. 12 March 2015. Retrieved 13 March 2015. 
  17. ^ "Zarb-e-Azb: 90% area recovered, 1198 terrorists killed". 14 November 2014. Archived from the original on 15 November 2014. Retrieved 15 November 2014. 
  18. ^ Web desk (10 October 2014). "PM lauds armed forces for successfully undertaking operation Zarb-e-Azb". New televised at the Today TV's headline section by the news casters (AJJ TV (Today TV), 2014). AJJ TV (Today TV). Retrieved 10 January 2015. 
  19. ^ "90% NWA areas cleared of terrorists: Maj-Gen Zafar". Samaa TV. 15 November 2014. Retrieved 5 January 2015. 
  20. ^ "Who are the Uzbeks launching terror strikes in Pakistan". The News International. 15 June 2014. Archived from the original on 30 June 2014. Retrieved 19 June 2014. 
  21. ^ "Report: A former physics teacher is now leading ISIS — Business Insider". Business Insider. 23 April 2015. Retrieved 29 June 2015. 
  22. ^ "ISIS' Abu Alaa al-Afri killed alongside dozens of followers in air strike — Daily Mail Online". Mail Online. Retrieved 29 June 2015. 
  23. ^ a b "Militant commander Hafiz Saeed killed in Khyber blast". ARY NEWS. 17 April 2015. 
  24. ^ "Released Gitmo detainee joins ISISNov. 19, 2014 - 2:30 - Former Taliban commander named chief of ISIS in Khorasa". fox news. Retrieved 23 November 2014. 
  25. ^ "Local support for dreaded Islamic State growing in Pakistan: Report". timesofindia.indiatimes.com. Times of India. Retrieved 23 November 2014. 
  26. ^ "IMU announces death of emir, names new leader". The Long War Journal. 4 August 2014. 
  27. ^ Walsh, Declan (16 June 2014). "In Drive Against Militants, Pakistani Airstrikes Hit Strongholds". The New York Times. Archived from the original on 30 June 2014. Retrieved 17 June 2014. 
  28. ^ a b c Shah, Saeed (15 June 2014). "Pakistan Operation Targets Waziristan Militants". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved 16 June 2014. 
  29. ^ a b "Army Chief Raheel Sharif Vows to Hunt Down Every Terrorist". Pakistan Tribe. 24 December 2014. Retrieved 24 December 2014. 
  30. ^ a b Fatalities in Terrorist Violence in Pakistan 2003–2015. Satp.org (18 August 2013). Retrieved on 2013-08-22.
  31. ^ Syed, Baqir Sajjad (14 June 2015). "Conclusive phase of Zarb-i-Azb next month". Dawn. Retrieved 14 June 2015. 
  32. ^ Template:Waqat news
  33. ^ "Operation Zarb-e-Azb updates archive". ISPR. Retrieved 30 June 2014. 
  34. ^ Gul, Pazir (16 June 2014). "Seven killed in clash between militant groups". Dawn. Archived from the original on 30 June 2014. Retrieved 17 June 2014. 
  35. ^ a b "Air raids flatten 5 militant hideouts". The Express Tribune. 14 July 2014. Archived from the original on 14 July 2014. Retrieved 14 July 2014. 
  36. ^ Khan, Wajahat S (14 October 2014). "Zarb-e-Azb: Gear up for the ‘forever war’". A series of special reports on Operation Zarb-e-Azb by the newspaper’s National Security Editor. (News International, 2014 editorial). News International. Retrieved 10 January 2015. 
  37. ^ "Zarb-e-Azb operation: 120 suspected militants killed in N Waziristan". Dawn. 15 June 2014. Archived from the original on 13 July 2014. Retrieved 16 June 2014. 
  38. ^ "Pakistan Launches Offensive Against Militants Near Afghan Border". Huffington Post. Associated Press. 15 June 2014. Archived from the original on 30 June 2014. Retrieved 23 June 2014. 
  39. ^ "Militant attacks declined after Zarb-e-Azb operation: report". The Nation. 17 June 2015. Archived from the original on 17 June 2015. Retrieved 17 June 2015. 
  40. ^ Desk, Web (10 June 2014). "Operation Zarb-e-Azb updates". The Express Tribune. Archived from the original on 13 July 2014. Retrieved 15 June 2014. 
  41. ^ "Negotiations end, Pak Army formally launches operation Zarb-e-Azb against terrorists; Dunya News". Dunyanews.tv. Archived from the original on 30 June 2014. Retrieved 15 June 2014. 
  42. ^ a b c Shahzeb Jillani (6 February 2014). "Pakistan enters peace talks with Taliban". BBC. Archived from the original on 30 June 2014. Retrieved 15 June 2014. 
  43. ^ a b "First day of Pakistan Taliban peace talks concluded". BBC. 26 March 2014. Archived from the original on 30 June 2014. Retrieved 15 June 2014. 
  44. ^ "Pakistani Taliban announce month-long ceasefire – Pakistan". Dawn (Pakistan). Archived from the original on 30 June 2014. Retrieved 15 June 2014. 
  45. ^ Crilly, Rob (17 February 2014). "Peace talks collapse as Taliban execute 23 Pakistani soldiers". The Daily Telegraph. Archived from the original on 30 June 2014. Retrieved 15 June 2014. 
  46. ^ Golovnina, Maria (17 February 2014). "Peace talks between Pakistan and Taliban collapse after killings". Maria Golovnina and Amjad Ali. Reuters. Archived from the original on 30 June 2014. Retrieved 15 June 2014. 
  47. ^ "TTP ends ceasefire, says talks option open – Newspaper". Dawn (Pakistan). 17 April 2014. Archived from the original on 13 July 2014. Retrieved 15 June 2014. 
  48. ^ "Taliban infighting impedes Pakistan peace talks – Pakistan". Dawn (Pakistan). Archived from the original on 13 July 2014. Retrieved 15 June 2014. 
  49. ^ a b "Heavy fighting reported at Karachi airport". Al Jazeera. 8 June 2014. Archived from the original on 13 July 2014. Retrieved 8 June 2014. 
  50. ^ Jon Boone in Islamabad. "Pakistani Taliban claim Karachi attack and leave peace talks in crisis". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 13 July 2014. Retrieved 15 June 2014. 
  51. ^ Shah, Saeed (9 June 2014). "Pakistan Weighs Strike Against Taliban Over Airport Attack". The Wall Street Journal. (subscription required (help)). 
  52. ^ Desk, Web. "Aerial bombing in Tirah valley kills 25 militants". The Express Tribune. Archived from the original on 17 July 2014. Retrieved 17 June 2014. 
  53. ^ "Successive drone strikes leave at least 16 dead in N Waziristan – Pakistan". Dawn (Pakistan). Archived from the original on 17 July 2014. Retrieved 17 June 2014. 
  54. ^ "Drone targeted Haqqani network commander, Afghan Taliban: sources – Pakistan". Dawn (Pakistan). Archived from the original on 17 July 2014. Retrieved 17 June 2014. 
  55. ^ "Mostly Uzbeks killed in overnight N Waziristan bombing: army – Pakistan". Dawn (Pakistan). Archived from the original on 17 July 2014. Retrieved 15 June 2014. 
  56. ^ "Karachi airport attack mastermind killed in N Waziristan: Sources – Pakistan". Dawn (Pakistan). Archived from the original on 17 July 2014. Retrieved 15 June 2014. 
  57. ^ Press Releases of 15 June, ISPR, 15 June 2014, archived from the original on 20 June 2014, retrieved 20 June 2014 
  58. ^ Omer Farooq Khan. "Pak military launches onslaught against Taliban". The Times of India. Archived from the original on 17 July 2014. Retrieved 16 June 2014. 
  59. ^ a b آصف فاروقی بی بی سی اردو ڈاٹ کام، اسلام آباد (1 January 1970). "پاکستان – BBC Urdu – 'حکومت نے آپریشن کے لیے 3 محاذوں پر تیاری کی'". BBC. Archived from the original on 17 July 2014. Retrieved 16 June 2014. 
  60. ^ a b c "Supporters and critics weigh in on operation – Pakistan". Dawn (Pakistan). Archived from the original on 17 July 2014. Retrieved 15 June 2014. 
  61. ^ a b "Pakistan army launches 'major offensive' in North Waziristan". BBC. 15 June 2014. Archived from the original on 17 July 2014. Retrieved 16 June 2014. 
  62. ^ "Gunships foray militant hideouts in North Waziristan, kill 12 terrorists". The News Tribe. 7 January 2015. Archived from the original on 23 May 2015. Retrieved 23 May 2015. 
  63. ^ "2,000 militants killed in North Waziristan so far: DG ISPR". The Express Tribune. 16 January 2015. Archived from the original on 23 May 2015. Retrieved 23 May 2015. 
  64. ^ "Aerial strikes kill 35 terrorists in North Waziristan". SAMAA TV. 25 January 2015. Archived from the original on 23 May 2015. Retrieved 23 May 2015. 
  65. ^ "Foreigners among 76 suspected militants killed in fresh North Waziristan air strikes". The Express Tribune. 27 January 2015. Archived from the original on 24 May 2015. Retrieved 24 May 2015. 
  66. ^ "N Waziristan operation: Army officer, 5 militants slain". The Express Tribune. 21 February 2015. Archived from the original on 23 May 2015. Retrieved 23 May 2015. 
  67. ^ "35 militants killed in North and South Waziristan air strikes". The Express Tribune. 22 April 2015. Archived from the original on 23 May 2015. Retrieved 23 May 2015. 
  68. ^ "Four soldiers, 7 militants killed". Dawn News. 24 May 2015. Archived from the original on 24 May 2015. Retrieved 24 May 2015. 
  69. ^ "Pakistan military says 23 militants killed in air strikes". Zee News. 5 July 2015. Archived from the original on 5 July 2015. Retrieved 5 July 2015. 
  70. ^ "Seven Pakistani troops killed as army pushes to finish anti-Taliban offensive". Channel NewsAsia. 5 July 2015. Archived from the original on 5 July 2015. Retrieved 5 July 2015. 
  71. ^ "7 Pakistani Troops Killed in Bomb Attack, Firefight". VOA News. 5 July 2015. Archived from the original on 5 July 2015. Retrieved 5 July 2015. 
  72. ^ "12 terrorists killed by security forces in North Waziristan". The News Tribe. 5 July 2015. Archived from the original on 5 July 2015. Retrieved 5 July 2015. 
  73. ^ "Taliban kill Pakistani soldier in attack on army bunker". The Express Tribune. 7 July 2015. Archived from the original on 7 July 2015. Retrieved 7 July 2015. 
  74. ^ a b c d e "Drone strike in North Waziristan kills 20". The Express Tribune. 16 July 2014. Archived from the original on 17 July 2014. Retrieved 16 July 2014. 
  75. ^ "Unending campaign: Drone strike kills 11 suspected militants in North Waziristan". The Express Tribune. 19 July 2014. Archived from the original on 20 July 2014. Retrieved 20 July 2014. 
  76. ^ "Drone strike kills 6 in North Waziristan". The ExpressTribune. 6 August 2014. Retrieved 14 August 2014. 
  77. ^ "Drone strike in North Waziristan kills at least eight". Zahir Shah Sherazi. Dawn. 24 September 2014. Retrieved 24 September 2014. 
  78. ^ Zahir Shah Sherazi. "Drone strike kills five in South Waziristan". DAWN. Retrieved 7 October 2014. 
  79. ^ "Drone strike kills eight, wounds six in North Waziristan". Zahir Shah Sherazi. Dawn. 6 October 2014. Retrieved 7 October 2014. 
  80. ^ "Second drone attack of the day kills three suspected militants in NWA". Zahir Shah Sherazi. Dawn. 7 October 2014. Retrieved 7 October 2014. 
  81. ^ "Drone strike kills four suspected militants in North Waziristan". Zahir Shah Sherazi. Dawn. 30 October 2014. Retrieved 30 October 2014. 
  82. ^ "US drone strike kills four in North Waziristan". Zahir Shah Sherazi. DAWN. 11 November 2014. Retrieved 11 November 2014. 
  83. ^ "key-qaeda-commanders-sarbuland-retired-major-adil-reported-killed-in-drone-attack". Zahir Shah Sherazi. DAWN. 21 November 2014. Retrieved 21 November 2014. 
  84. ^ "Al-Qaeda commander 'killed' in Pakistan". Aljazeera. 7 December 2014. Retrieved 7 December 2014. 
  85. ^ "7-suspected-militants-including-3-foreigners-killed-in-north-waziristan-drone-strikes". Zahir Shah Sherazi. Dawn. 26 December 2014. Retrieved 26 December 2014. 
  86. ^ "Hafiz Gul Bahadur group targeted in N Waziristan drone strike". Zahir Shah Sherazi. Dawn. 3 January 2014. Retrieved 3 January 2015. 
  87. ^ "US drone strike kills seven in South Waziristan". Zahir Shah Shirazi. Dawn. 15 January 2015. Retrieved 16 January 2015. 
  88. ^ "US drone attack in North Waziristan kills six". Zahir Shah Shirazi. Dawn. 19 January 2015. Retrieved 19 January 2015. 
  89. ^ "US drone strike kills six in North Waziristan". Zahir Shah Shirazi. Dawn. 28 January 2015. Retrieved 28 January 2015. 
  90. ^ "Obama 2015 pakistan drone strikes". thebureauinvestigates.com. Retrieved 16 April 2015. 
  91. ^ "Drone strike in northwest Pakistan kills four suspected militants". Javed Hussain and Saud Mehsud. Reuters. 12 April 2015. Retrieved 16 April 2015. 
  92. ^ Press Release. "Pakistan Condemns US Drone Strike in North Waziristan". mofa.gov.pk. Ministry of Foreign Affairs Government of Pakistan. Retrieved 10 June 2015. 
  93. ^ Walker, Lauren. "Report: Drone Strikes Kill Dozens in Afghanistan, Pakistan and Yemen in May". newsweek.com. NEWSWEEK. Retrieved 10 June 2015. 
  94. ^ "US drone attack in NWA kills six". Dawn News. 17 May 2015. Retrieved 14 June 2015. 
  95. ^ "US drone strike kills four suspected militants in North Waziristan". The Express Tribune. 2 June 2015. Archived from the original on 14 June 2015. Retrieved 14 June 2015. 
  96. ^ "At least nine killed in NWA drone strike". Pakistan Today. 6 June 2015. Archived from the original on 14 June 2015. Retrieved 14 June 2015. 
  97. ^ "US kills Afghan Taliban fighters in drone strike in Pakistan". Long War Journal. 6 June 2015. Archived from the original on 14 June 2015. Retrieved 14 June 2015. 
  98. ^ "2,763 terrorists killed in Operation Zarb-e-Azb". The Express Tribune. 14 June 2015. Archived from the original on 14 June 2015. Retrieved 14 June 2015. 
  99. ^ "2,763 terrorists, 347 Pakistan army personnel killed in Zarb-e-Azb so far: ISPR". DND. 13 June 2015. Archived from the original on 14 June 2015. Retrieved 14 June 2015. 
  100. ^ "A hard-fought year". The Express Tribune. 16 June 2015. Archived from the original on 17 June 2015. Retrieved 17 June 2015. 
  101. ^ a b c "COAS visits forward most locations near Pak-Afghan border". The Nation. 3 July 2015. Archived from the original on 3 July 2015. Retrieved 3 July 2015. 
  102. ^ "Conclusive phase of Zarb-i-Azb next month". Dawn News. 14 June 2015. Archived from the original on 17 June 2015. Retrieved 17 June 2015. 
  103. ^ "Pak to launch 'final phase' of Operation Zarb-i-Azb next month". Business Standard. 14 June 2015. Retrieved 17 June 2015. 
  104. ^ a b c "US, UAE provide $51m for N Waziristan IDPs". The Express Tribune. 6 July 2014. Archived from the original on 7 July 2014. Retrieved 7 July 2014. 
  105. ^ "0.57m IDPs registered, Rs 329.5m distributed so far, Nawaz informed". Pakistan Tribune. 7 July 2014. Archived from the original on 7 July 2014. Retrieved 7 July 2014. 
  106. ^ "Press Releases of 19 July". ISPR. Archived from the original on 20 July 2014. Retrieved 20 July 2014. 
  107. ^ "PM has given clear instructions not to seek external assistance: FO". The Express Tribune. 10 July 2014. Archived from the original on 10 July 2014. Retrieved 10 July 2014. 
  108. ^ Haider, Mateen (22 Jul 2014). "Zarb-i-Azb: US announce $9.3 million more in IDPs aid". Dawn. Retrieved 22 Jul 2014. 
  109. ^ "Seeking assistance: Zarb-e-Azb to cost $1.3b, Dar tells US legislator". The Express Tribune. 19 February 2015. Archived from the original on 24 May 2015. Retrieved 24 May 2015. 
  110. ^ "Winding up the offensive: Army gives nod for return of IDPs to N Waziristan". The Express Tribune. 8 December 2014. Archived from the original on 23 May 2015. Retrieved 23 May 2015. 
  111. ^ "IDPs’ return to North Waziristan begins". Dawn News. 1 April 2015. Archived from the original on 23 May 2015. Retrieved 23 May 2015. 
  112. ^ "Return of North Waziristan IDPs continues at snail’s pace". Dawn News. 4 May 2015. Archived from the original on 23 May 2015. Retrieved 23 May 2015. 
  113. ^ "Operation 'Zarb-e-Azb' gets a 'thumbs up' on social media – Pakistan". Dawn (Pakistan). Archived from the original on 17 July 2014. Retrieved 15 June 2014. 
  114. ^ "Groundswell of support: PTI endorses operation to flush out Waziristan militants". The Express Tribune. 17 June 2014. Archived from the original on 8 July 2014. Retrieved 8 July 2014. 
  115. ^ a b "PTI endorses Zarb-e-Azb operation — Pakistan". Dawn (newspaper). 16 June 2014. Archived from the original on 8 July 2014. Retrieved 8 July 2014. 
  116. ^ "Siraj-ul-Haq urges govt to keep doors open for peace talks". Khyber News. Archived from the original on 17 July 2014. 
  117. ^ "Operation to cause colossal human tragedy, claims JI". The News. 17 June 2014. Archived from the original on 17 July 2014. 
  118. ^ "Better late than never!". Staff report. Pakistan Today. 16 June 2014. Archived from the original on 17 July 2014. Retrieved 18 June 2014. 
  119. ^ "Massive political support for military operation". Asim Yasin, The News. 16 June 2014. Archived from the original on 17 July 2014. Retrieved 18 June 2014. 
  120. ^ "Tribal elders of North Waziristan assure support to Zarb-e-Azb: ISPR". Pakistan Today. Archived from the original on 17 July 2014. Retrieved 21 June 2014. 
  121. ^ "Ulema declare operation Zarb-e-Azb as jihad". Pak Tribune. 23 June 2014. Archived from the original on 17 July 2014. Retrieved 23 June 2014. 
  122. ^ "Afghanistan assures Pakistan of full support in NWA operation". Daily Times Pakistan. 19 June 2014. Archived from the original on 17 July 2014. Retrieved 23 June 2014. 
  123. ^ "UAE Extends Support to Pakistan against Militants | News Pakistan". Newspakistan.pk. 27 February 2012. Archived from the original on 13 July 2014. Retrieved 26 June 2014. 
  124. ^ "Over 450,000 people displaced in northwestern Pakistan". Xinhua News Agency. 23 June 2014. Archived from the original on 24 June 2014. Retrieved 24 June 2014. 
  125. ^ APP. "UAE announces $2.5m for IDPs in N Waziristan – The Express Tribune". Tribune.com.pk. Archived from the original on 13 July 2014. Retrieved 26 June 2014. 
  126. ^ "Polio may spread in wake of North Waziristan operation: UN – Pakistan". Dawn. 24 June 2014. Archived from the original on 13 July 2014. Retrieved 26 June 2014. 
  127. ^ "US supports operation 'Zarb-e-Azb' against Taliban". The News International. 9 June 2014. Archived from the original on 13 July 2014. Retrieved 16 June 2014. 
  128. ^ "US pressure for operation in Waziristan mounts". The News International. Archived from the original on 13 July 2014. Retrieved 17 June 2014. 
  129. ^ "US not taken into confidence over North Waziristan operation". The News International. 9 June 2014. Archived from the original on 13 July 2014. Retrieved 16 June 2014. 
  130. ^ "Operation Zarb-i-Azb disrupted Haqqani network: US general". Dawn. 6 November 2014. Archived from the original on 7 November 2014. Retrieved 7 November 2014. 
  131. ^ "China supports military operation". Dawn (newspaper). 10 July 2014. Archived from the original on 10 July 2014. Retrieved 10 July 2014. 
  132. ^ "Chairman State Duma appreciates Pakistan's efforts for stability in region". Retrieved 19 June 2015. 
  133. ^ "Russia stands with Pakistan in fight against extremism, Army chief told". Retrieved 19 June 2015. 
  134. ^ "Deal with Russia for purchase of Mi-35 attack helicopters on the cards". Retrieved 19 June 2015. 
  135. ^ "Russia praises Operation Zarb-e-Azb". The News. 18 June 2015. Archived from the original on 18 June 2015. Retrieved 18 June 2015. 
  136. ^ "Suicide bombing? At least 55 killed, over 200 injured in Wagah border bomb blast". IndianExpress.com. 
  137. ^ a b "Peshawar school attack: Over 100 killed in Pakistani Taliban attack, hundreds of students hostage". DNA India. 16 December 2014. Retrieved 16 December 2014. 
  138. ^ "Peshawar school hostage crisis updates". The Express Tribune. 16 December 2014. Retrieved 16 December 2014. 
  139. ^ Kearney, Seamus (16 December 2014). "Children targeted in Pakistan’s deadliest militant attack in years; 132 students are killed". Euronews. Retrieved 16 December 2014. 
  140. ^ Popham, Peter (16 December 2014). "Peshawar school attack: 'I will never forget the black boots...It was like death approaching me'". The Independent. Retrieved 16 December 2014. 
  141. ^ "TTP militants storm Peshawar school; 131 killed, more than 100 injured". Pakistan Today. Retrieved 16 December 2014. 
  142. ^ "Six militants killed in Peshawar operation". Dunya News. 20 December 2014. Retrieved 20 December 2014. 
  143. ^ "Rangers kill three ‘terrorists’ in Karachi shootout". Retrieved 20 December 2014. 
  144. ^ "TTP commander Abid Muchar, three militants killed in Karachi". Express Tribunes. 22 December 2014. Retrieved 22 December 2014. 
  145. ^ a b Yusufzai, Ashfaq (26 December 2014). "Mastermind of Peshawar school attack killed". Telegraph, Pakistan Bureau, 2014. Telegraph, Pakistan Bureau. Retrieved 20 June 2015. Pakistan says it has killed the alleged mastermind of a school attack in Peshawar that claimed the lives of 132 children 
  146. ^ Samaa TV (9 January 2015). "Al-Qaeda Karachi chief among 4 militants killed". Samaa TV. Samaa TV. Retrieved 9 January 2015. 
  147. ^ a b Haider, Nadeem (10 January 2015). "Wagah blast 'mastermind', two others killed in Lahore". Dawn News, 9 January. Dawn News. Retrieved 10 January 2015.