Operations Malheur I and Malheur II

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Operations Malheur I and Malheur II
Part of Vietnam War
DateMay 11 – August 2, 1967
LocationQuảng Ngãi Province
Result Allies claim victory
Belligerents
Flag of the United States.svg United States
Flag of South Vietnam.svg South Vietnam
Flag of Vietnam.svg North Vietnam
FNL Flag.svg Viet Cong
Casualties and losses
United States 81
Flag of South Vietnam.svg Unknown
869 killed (per US, see body count claims)

Operation Malheur I and Operation Malheur II were a series of search and destroy operations conducted by the 1st Brigade 101st Airborne Division operating as part of Task Force Oregon in Quảng Ngãi Province.[1]

Operation Malheur I began on 11 May 1967 and continued until 8 June 1967. The operation began with airmobile assaults aimed at the Viet Cong (VC) 2nd Regiment in Base Area 124 to the west of Đức Phổ District.[1]

Operation Malheur II began on 8 June and continued until 2 August 1967. The operation began with an air assault against Base Area 123 and on June 9 with an air assault against into the area west of the Song Ve valley.[1]

The operations mainly consisted of small-scale skirmishes and were successful in disrupting the VC/People's Army of Vietnam (PAVN), but failed to eradicate them. The VC/PAVN were moving freely in the area again by the end of the year. U.S. forces also distributed in excess of 23 million leaflets in the area.

When the operations closed, the 101st reported 869 VC and PAVN killed and 314 weapons captured, for the loss of 81 US killed.[1] The United States Agency for International Development reported 6,400 civilian casualties in the province for 1967 throughout the year, though obviously not all of these could be attributed to the Malheur operations or even to American military action.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Combat After Action – Operation Malheur, conducted by 1st Brigade, 101st Airborne Division" (PDF). Department of the Army, Office of the Adjutant General. 3 October 1967. Archived from the original (PDF) on 3 October 2012.