Irreligious (album)

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Irreligious
MoonspellIrreligiousFrontS.jpg
Studio album by Moonspell
Released July 29, 1996
Genre Gothic metal, doom metal
Length 42:35
Label Century Media
Producer Waldemar Sorychta
Moonspell chronology
Wolfheart
(1995)Wolfheart1995
Irreligious
(1996)
Sin/Pecado
(1998)Sin/Pecado1998
Singles from Irreligious
  1. "Opium"
    Released: October 1, 1996
Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic 2.5/5 stars[1]

Irreligious is the second studio album by Portuguese gothic metal band, Moonspell, released 1996. It features some of the best-known songs of the band, such as "Opium", "Ruin & Misery", "Awake!" and "Full Moon Madness". The latter is usually the closing song during almost every Moonspell concert, which over time has become a characteristic of their concerts. Before the song begins, Fernando Ribeiro often makes the sign of the circle (symbolizing Moon) over the crowd. The 3rd track "Awake!" features a recording of Aleister Crowley reading his poem 'The Poet'.

Track listing[edit]

No. Title Length
1. "Perverse... Almost Religious" 01:07
2. "Opium" 02:48
3. "Awake!" 03:04
4. "For a Taste of Eternity" 03:53
5. "Ruin & Misery" 03:49
6. "A Poisoned Gift" 05:35
7. "Subversion" 02:44
8. "Raven Claws" 03:16
9. "Mephisto" 04:58
10. "Herr Spiegelmann" 04:35
11. "Full Moon Madness" 06:46
12. "Opium" (Radio Edit) (digipack release bonus track) 02:48
Total length: 45:23

Personnel[edit]

  • Fernando Ribeiro - vocals
  • Mike - drums
  • Pedro Paixão - keyboards, samples
  • Ares - bass
  • Ricardo Amorim - guitars

Guest musicians[edit]

  • Markus Freiwald - percussion on "For a Taste of Eternity"
  • Birgit Zacher - vocals on "Raven Claws"

Production[edit]

  • Rolf Brenner - photography
  • Siggi Bemm - engineering
  • Waldemar Sorychta - producer, mixing

Opium video[edit]

The album was promoted by the first Moonspell music video "Opium", which contained imagery of 19th century-looking opium den.

References[edit]