Optical chaos

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In the field of photonics, optical chaos is chaos generated by laser instabilities using different schemes in semiconductor and fiber lasers.[1] Optical chaos is observed in many non-linear optical systems. One of the most common examples is an optical ring resonators.[2]

Optical computing[edit]

Optical chaos was a field of research in the mid-1980s and was aimed at the production of all-optical devices including all-optical computers. Researchers realised later the inherent limitation of the optical systems due to the nonlocalised nature of photons compared to highly localised nature of electrons.

Communications[edit]

Research in optical chaos has seen a recent resurgence in the context of studying synchronization phenomena, and in developing techniques for secure optical communications.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Szlachetka, P.; Grygiel, K. (2001). "Chaos in Optical Systems". Advances in Chemical Physics. 119: 353–427. doi:10.1002/0471231487.ch4. ISBN 0471389315.
  2. ^ Ikeda, K.; Akimoto, O. (1 March 1982). "Instability Leading to Periodic and Chaotic Self-Pulsations in a Bistable Optical Cavity". Physical Review Letters. 48 (9): 617. Bibcode:1982PhRvL..48..617I. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.48.617. Retrieved 17 November 2015.
  3. ^ Argyris, Apostolos; Syvridis, Dimitris; Larger, Laurent; Annovazzi-Lodi, Valerio; Colet, Pere; Fischer, Ingo; García-Ojalvo, Jordi; Mirasso, Claudio R.; Pesquera, Luis; Shore, K. Alan (2005). "Chaos-based communications at high bit rates using commercial fibre-optic links". Nature. 438 (7066): 343–346. Bibcode:2005Natur.437..343A. doi:10.1038/nature04275. ISSN 0028-0836. PMID 16292256. S2CID 4412845.