Orbiter (ride)

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At night time, an Orbiter in full motion is a bewildering blur of lights.
In daylight, it is a little easier to see how the cars are arranged.

The Orbiter is a fairground ride invented by Richard Woolls in 1976.

History[edit]

Richard Wools invented the Orbiter in 1976, with showman Henry Frederick Smith investing in the blueprints and consequently being the first owner, taking delivery in 1976 of the OB-1, making its debut at Dreamland Amusement Park in Margate, Kent.[1] The Orbiter is made by Tivoli Manufacturing, a British company. In the U.S. their representative is Amtech.

Description[edit]

It has a number of articulated arms radiating from a central rotating vertical axis. Each arm supports a cluster of cars, which are lifted through 90° into the horizontal position once the ride is spinning. At the same time, each cluster of cars rotates around its arm's axis.

The Orbiter/Typhoon/Predator arms don't always tilt at the same height (90%). Some might tilt all the way while others don't tilt a lot. Most Orbiters consist of six arms, and have three cars for each arm with up to two people sitting in each car. There is a metal lap bar that comes down on the car for the restraint.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Orbiter". National Fairground and Circus Archive. Retrieved May 2, 2017. 

External links[edit]