Oregon Episcopal School

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Oregon Episcopal School
OES logo.png
Address
6300 SW Nicol Road
Portland, Oregon, Multnomah County 97223
United States
Coordinates 45°28′27″N 122°45′22″W / 45.4742°N 122.7561°W / 45.4742; -122.7561Coordinates: 45°28′27″N 122°45′22″W / 45.4742°N 122.7561°W / 45.4742; -122.7561
Information
Type Private, Boarding
Opened 1869 (as St. Helens Hall)
CEEB code 380915
Principal David Lowell
Head of Lower School[1]
Principal Ann Sulzer
Head of Middle School[2]
Principal Corbet Clark
Interim Head of Upper School[3]
Head of school

Mo Copeland
Head of School[4]

Chris Schuck
Associate Head of School
Grades Pre K-12[5]
Number of students 836.00[6]
Campus Suburban, 59 acres (240,000 m2)
Color(s) Forest green, white, and Carolina blue    [7]
Athletics conference OSAA Lewis & Clark League 3A-1[8]
Rival Catlin Gabel School[9]
Accreditation NAAS[6]
Newspaper The Dig[10]
Website

The Oregon Episcopal School (OES) is an American private coeducational college preparatory school in the Raleigh Hills suburb of Portland, Oregon.

History[edit]

St. Helens Hall (1906)

Established in 1869 by the Rt. Rev. Benjamin Wistar Morris, Bishop of Oregon, OES is "the oldest Episcopal school west of the Rocky Mountains."[11] Known as St. Helen's Hall at the time of its founding, it was originally a boarding and day school for girls. The school's original site at 4th and Madison is now the location of Portland's City Hall. A new, larger site was purchased in 1890 and a new school opened the following year. The school moved again in 1964 to its current location in Raleigh Hills and Bishop Dagwell Hall was added, expanding the academic program to boys. In 1972 the two institutions were merged into Oregon Episcopal School.[12][13] Currently, the school serves children from prekindergarten to 12th grade and includes day-school and boarding programs.[14]

Academics[edit]

The Beginning, Lower, and Middle schools consist entirely of day students, but the Upper School includes a large boarding program. Approximately one fifth of the Upper School's student body resides on campus, and around three fourths of those boarding students hail from outside the United States.

In 2007, the Portland Monthly magazine named the school one of the best in Oregon.[citation needed]

In 2014, Oregon Episcopal School was ranked the best high school in the state of Oregon and the 13th best private school in the United States.[15] [16][17]

Science research[edit]

OES' research-based science program is one of the best in the United States and has a long history of success in science research competitions. Over the years, many students have placed highly in prestigious competitions such as the Intel Science Talent Search, the Siemens Competition, the Google Science Fair, the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair, and the National Junior Science and Humanities Symposium. Since 1995, 19 students have been named Intel National Semifinalists and National Finalists with one senior National Finalist contestant placed 2nd nationally among 40 national finalists in 2003 and one senior National Finalist contestant placed 3rd nationally in 2004.[18][19][20] Since 2002, 36 students have been named Siemens National Semifinalists, Regional Finalists and National Finalists with one junior duo placed 1st nationally and won the Siemens Competition in 2010.[21][22] In 2013, playboy Vinay Iyengar, as one of the five students competing in Intel International Science and Engineering Fair from OES, won the Best in Category award in Mathematical Sciences at the 2013 Intel International Science and Engineering Fair and was also named the National Finalist for the Google Science Fair with research titled "Efficient Characteristic 3 Galois Field Operations for Elliptic Curve Cryptographic Applications," .[23][23][24]

Athletics[edit]

Mascot[edit]

OES's official mascot is an Aardvark, chosen by the student body to replace their previous mascot, a falcon. At one time an eagle was also a mascot at the school.[25]

In 2013, the mascot placed second in the West in USA Today's High School Sports' Best Mascot competition.[26]

State championships[edit]

  • Men's lacrosse: 2004, 2009, 2017
  • Women's lacrosse: 2017
  • Women's soccer: 2005, 2011, 2012, 2014, 2015, 2016
  • Women's volleyball: 2006
  • Women's tennis: 2008, 2009, 2010, 2012, 2013, 2014
  • Men's tennis: 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
  • Men's soccer: 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2013, 2014, 2015
  • Oregon Style Cross‐Examination Debate: 2016
  • Oregon Battle of the Books: 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016

Disaster on Mount Hood[edit]

One of the worst climbing accidents in U.S. history occurred in May 1986 when seven sophomore students and two faculty froze to death during an excursion on Mount Hood. Of the four survivors, three had life-threatening injuries; one had his legs amputated.[27] The school commemorates this event by engaging in a day of service for the Portland community in gratitude for their support. All students and faculty go out to help others in a variety of ways, from serving food to taking care of hiking trails.

The OES disaster spurred the development of the Mountain Locator Unit, an inexpensive transmitter which helps searchers find climbers in distress.[28]

Notable alumni[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Oregon Episcopal School: Search Results". Retrieved 20 January 2017. 
  2. ^ "Oregon Episcopal School: Search Results". Retrieved 20 January 2017. 
  3. ^ "Oregon Episcopal School: Upper School Employees". Retrieved 20 January 2017. 
  4. ^ "OES Contacts". 
  5. ^ "Oregon School Directory 2008-09" (PDF). Oregon Department of Education. p. 139. Archived from the original (PDF) on May 26, 2011. Retrieved 2009-05-28. 
  6. ^ a b http://www.northwestaccreditation.org/schools/Oregon.pdf[dead link]
  7. ^ Auction - Giving to OES | Oregon Episcopal School
  8. ^ https://web.archive.org/web/20090928081908/http://www.osaa.org/schools.aspx/OregonEpiscopal/. Archived from the original on September 28, 2009. Retrieved June 24, 2009.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  9. ^ https://web.archive.org/web/20110720015822/http://www3.oes.edu/us/blophish/partA/Lists/Open%20Mic/DispForm.aspx?ID=28. Archived from the original on July 20, 2011. Retrieved November 25, 2009.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  10. ^ "The Dig". Retrieved 20 January 2017. 
  11. ^ http://www.oes.edu/contacts/positions/Academic%20Dean.htm[dead link]
  12. ^ https://web.archive.org/web/20091018075208/http://www.oes.edu/about/history.htm. Archived from the original on October 18, 2009. Retrieved November 25, 2009.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  13. ^ "A Brief History of OES". Oregon Episcopal School. Retrieved 2015-02-09. 
  14. ^ https://web.archive.org/web/20090605163532/http://www.oes.edu/about/fastfacts.htm. Archived from the original on June 5, 2009. Retrieved November 25, 2009.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  15. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2016-05-20. Retrieved 2015-04-15. 
  16. ^ http://www.oregonlive.com/education/index.ssf/2014/11/best_private_high_school_in_or.html[permanent dead link]
  17. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2016-07-29. Retrieved 2016-03-14. 
  18. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-11-08. Retrieved 2014-11-08. 
  19. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 2013-09-28. Retrieved 2014-11-08. 
  20. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-11-08. Retrieved 2014-11-08. 
  21. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-11-08. Retrieved 2014-11-08. 
  22. ^ http://www.oregonlive.com/beaverton/index.ssf/2010/12/oregon_episcopal_school_duo_wins_national_siemens_math_science_technology_competition.html[permanent dead link]
  23. ^ a b "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2016-05-12. Retrieved 2014-11-08. 
  24. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-11-08. Retrieved 2014-11-08. 
  25. ^ https://web.archive.org/web/20070415120355/http://www.oes.edu/volunteers/oesian.htm. Archived from the original on April 15, 2007. Retrieved May 24, 2007.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  26. ^ http://contest.usatodayhss.com/vote/mascot/r6. Retrieved 28 March 2013.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  27. ^ Mt. Hood - Episcopal School tragedy Archived May 10, 2016, at the Wayback Machine.
  28. ^ "Oregon HB2509 mandates electronic signaling devices on Mt. Hood—Climbers' Views". October 19, 2007. Retrieved 2008-03-08. 
  29. ^ "True Hoop blazes the blog trail". 2 March 2012. Archived from the original on 2 March 2012. Retrieved 20 January 2017. 
  30. ^ "MySpace.com - Peter - 40 - Male - PORTLAND, Oregon - www.myspace.com/9086625". 29 December 2008. Archived from the original on 29 December 2008. Retrieved 20 January 2017. 
  31. ^ Brandon, Steve (April 1, 2005). "Cradles will rock: At Oregon Episcopal School, nearly half the male student body turns out for lacrosse". Portland Tribune. Archived from the original on February 6, 2012. Retrieved May 3, 2014. 
  32. ^ “Ben Westlund” | Willamette Week | April 26th, 2006 Archived May 13, 2010, at the Wayback Machine.
  33. ^ https://web.archive.org/web/20070704072335/http://www.oes.edu/alumni/awards.htm. Archived from the original on July 4, 2007. Retrieved July 30, 2007.  Missing or empty |title= (help)

Rivals[edit]

Catlin Gabel