Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation

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Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation, Victory ships 1944
Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation's SS Davidson Victory on ways
Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation's USS Glynn (APA-239), Victory ship

Oregon Shipbuilding Corporation was a World War II emergency shipyard located in Portland, Oregon, United States, that built nearly 600 Liberty and Victory ships between 1941 and 1945 under the Emergency Shipbuilding program.[1] It was closed after the war ended.

The shipyard, one of three Kaiser Shipyards in the area, was in St. Johns. The second, also known as Swan Island Shipyard, which built over 150 T2 tankers, was located on Swan Island;[2] the third, which produced over 140 vessels, including naval landing ships as well as merchant ships, was across the Columbia River from Portland in Vancouver, Washington.[3][4][5]

Among the ships built by Oregon Shipbuilding was the Star of Oregon,[6] which was launched on Liberty Fleet Day, September 27, 1941.

The rapid expansion of Portland area shipyards during World War II and contraction afterward caused similar expansion and contraction of the population of Vanport City, Oregon, which was also built by Henry J. Kaiser to house the workers of the three area shipyards.[6]

The former site of Oregon Shipbuilding in St. Johns is now Schnitzer Steel Industries.[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Colton, Tim. "Oregon Shipbuilding, Portland OR". Shipbuilding History. Tim Colton. Retrieved 1 March 2018.
  2. ^ Colton, Tim. "Kaiser Swan Island, Portland OR". Shipbuilding History. Retrieved 1 March 2018.
  3. ^ "Kaiser & Oregon Shipyards". Oregon Historical Society. Archived from the original on October 29, 2005.
  4. ^ Abbot, Carl. "Vanport". The Oregon Encyclopedia.
  5. ^ Colton, Tim. "Kaiser Vancouver, Vancouver WA". Shipbuilding History. Retrieved 1 March 2018.
  6. ^ a b Record Breakers, story of Oregon Shipbuilding
  7. ^ "The Forgotten Ships" Archived June 7, 2011, at the Wayback Machine.