Oreobates

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Oreobates
Oreobates quixensis (15411369720).jpg
Oreobates quixensis
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Amphibia
Order: Anura
Family: Craugastoridae
Subfamily: Holoadeninae
Genus: Oreobates
Jiménez de la Espada, 1872
Type species
Oreobates quixensis
Jiménez de la Espada, 1872
Diversity
23 species (see text)
Synonyms

Teletrema Miranda-Ribeiro, 1937

Oreobates is a frog genus of in the Craugastoridae family.[1] Most species were formerly in the genus Ischnocnema, but were moved to this revalidated genus following a 2006 revision.[2] Its sister taxon is Lynchius.[1]

These frogs are found in the lower slopes of the Andes into the upper Amazon Basin from Colombia south to northern Argentina and east into western Brazil.[1]

Description[edit]

Oreobates are small to medium-sized frogs with males measuring 20–44 mm (0.79–1.73 in) and females 25–63 mm (0.98–2.48 in) in snout–vent length. They are generally brownish in colour. Body is robust with a short snout. The toes lack discs and fingers have reduced or absent discs; there is no webbing.[3]

Oreobates lay terrestrial eggs that undergo direct development.[3]

Species[edit]

There are 23 Oreobates species:[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Frost, Darrel R. (2014). "Oreobates Jiménez de la Espada, 1872". Amphibian Species of the World: an Online Reference. Version 6.0. American Museum of Natural History. Retrieved 5 July 2014. 
  2. ^ Caramaschi, Ulisses; Canedo, Clarrisa (2006). "Reassessment of the taxonomic status of the genera Ischnocnema Reinhardt and Lütken, 1862 and Oreobates Jiménez-de-la-Espada, 1872, with notes on the synonymy of Leiuperus verrucosus Reinhardt and Lütken, 1862 (Anura: Leptodactylidae)" (PDF). Zootaxa. 1116: 43–54. 
  3. ^ a b Padial, José M.; Chaparro, Juan C.; De La Riva, Ignacio (2008). "Systematics of Oreobates and the Eleutherodactylus discoidalis species group (Amphibia, Anura), based on two mitochondrial DNA genes and external morphology". Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society. 152 (4): 737–773. doi:10.1111/j.1096-3642.2007.00372.x.