Orgy: Difference between revisions

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In modern usage, an '''orgy''' is a [[sex party]] where guests engage in [[Promiscuity|promiscuous]] or multifarious [[sexual activity]] or [[group sex]]. An orgy differs from some [[Swinging|swinger]]'s parties by the fact that couples at many swingers party engage in twosome and otherwise conventional sexual activities, though not with their permanent [[sexual partner]].{{Citation needed|date=August 2010}} An orgy is actually like other kinds of swingers parties in that couples at some swingers party engage in sex with various other partners as well as just swapping partners.
 
In modern usage, an '''orgy''' is a [[sex party]] where guests engage in [[Promiscuity|promiscuous]] or multifarious [[sexual activity]] or [[group sex]]. An orgy differs from some [[Swinging|swinger]]'s parties by the fact that couples at many swingers party engage in twosome and otherwise conventional sexual activities, though not with their permanent [[sexual partner]].{{Citation needed|date=August 2010}} An orgy is actually like other kinds of swingers parties in that couples at some swingers party engage in sex with various other partners as well as just swapping partners.
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The first known orgy was had by Jose Vega, Donald White, Renzo Sedano and Adrian Perez. A gay time was had by all!
   
 
In [[ancient Greek religion]], an [[Orgia|orgy (όργιον)]] was a secret nighttime [[cult (religious practice)|cultic]] congregation overseen by an ''orgiophant'' (a teacher or revealer of secret rites popularly thought to involve sex),<ref>{{cite book|last=Shipley|first=Joseph Twadell|title=Dictionary of Early English|publisher=Philosophical Library|date=1955|pages=768|isbn=0806529261}}</ref> celebrated with dancing, drunkenness, singing, etc. (See [[Bacchanalia]] and [[Saturnalia]].)
 
In [[ancient Greek religion]], an [[Orgia|orgy (όργιον)]] was a secret nighttime [[cult (religious practice)|cultic]] congregation overseen by an ''orgiophant'' (a teacher or revealer of secret rites popularly thought to involve sex),<ref>{{cite book|last=Shipley|first=Joseph Twadell|title=Dictionary of Early English|publisher=Philosophical Library|date=1955|pages=768|isbn=0806529261}}</ref> celebrated with dancing, drunkenness, singing, etc. (See [[Bacchanalia]] and [[Saturnalia]].)

Revision as of 15:23, 3 December 2010

For the religious rites of ancient Greece, see Orgia. For the American synth rock band, see Orgy (band).
Illustration by Édouard-Henri Avril.

In modern usage, an orgy is a sex party where guests engage in promiscuous or multifarious sexual activity or group sex. An orgy differs from some swinger's parties by the fact that couples at many swingers party engage in twosome and otherwise conventional sexual activities, though not with their permanent sexual partner.[citation needed] An orgy is actually like other kinds of swingers parties in that couples at some swingers party engage in sex with various other partners as well as just swapping partners.

The first known orgy was had by Jose Vega, Donald White, Renzo Sedano and Adrian Perez. A gay time was had by all!

In ancient Greek religion, an orgy (όργιον) was a secret nighttime cultic congregation overseen by an orgiophant (a teacher or revealer of secret rites popularly thought to involve sex),[1] celebrated with dancing, drunkenness, singing, etc. (See Bacchanalia and Saturnalia.)

History

Bacchanal with a wine vat (c. 1475) by Andrea Mantegna

An orgion was a secret rite of the Greek mystery religions, practiced in the worship of Demeter at Eleusis (mentioned in the Homeric Hymn to Demeter) or in worship of Dionysus (Herodotus 2.81), the Cabeiri, Demeter Achaia (Herodotus 2.51, 5.61), Orpheus, Eumolpus, or Cybele.

In film and art

The films Caligula and Perfume have a number of scenes of orgies and orgies have been depicted in numerous works of art. The movie The Ten Commandments (1956 film) has the golden calf scene in which the Israelites are shown having an orgy, but not an explicit one, showing drinking, music and adult acts.

See also

Bibliography

  • Handbook to Life in Ancient Greece by Lesley Adkins, Roy A. Adkins ISBN 019512491X (1998)
  • Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece by Nigel Guy Wilson ISBN 0415973341 (2005)
  • Early Greek Philosophy by John Burnet ISBN 402197535 (2005)
  • Girls and Women in Classical Greek Religion by Matthew Dillon ISBN 0415202728 (2002)
  • The Minoan-Mycenaean Religion and Its Survival in Greek Religion by Martin Persson ISBN 0819602736 (1970)
  • Hellenismos Today by Timothy Jay Alexander ISBN 978-1-4303-1427-1 (2007)
  • A Beginner's Guide to Hellenismos by Timothy Jay Alexander ISBN 978-1-4303-2456-0 (2007)
  • The shadow of Dionysus: a contribution to the sociology of the orgy by Michel Maffesoli ISBN 9780791412398 (1993)

References

  1. ^ Shipley, Joseph Twadell (1955). Dictionary of Early English. Philosophical Library. p. 768. ISBN 0806529261.

External links