Orienteering World Cup

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Orienteering World Cup
Statusactive
Genresports event
Date(s)January–October
Frequencyannual
Location(s)various
Inaugurated1983 (1983)
AreaEurope
Organised byIOF
Websiteranking.orienteering.org
2019 Orienteering World Cup

The Orienteering World Cup is a series of orienteering competitions organized annually by the International Orienteering Federation. Two unofficial cups were organized in 1983 and 1984. The first official World Cup was held in 1986, and then every second year up to 2004. From 2004 the World Cup has been held annually.

Hosting nations[edit]

Year Hosting nations Notes
1986 Norway, Canada, USA, France, Sweden, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Switzerland 8 events
1988 Hong Kong, Australia, Great Britain, Finland, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Sweden 8 events
1990 Poland, Denmark, Norway, Canada, USA, Switzerland, France, Germany 8 events
1992 Sweden, Finland, Russia, Hungary, Austria, Italy, Canada, USA 8 events
1994 New Zealand, Australia, Norway, Denmark, Germany, Czech Republic 9 events (6 individual, 3 relays)
1996 Lithuania, Latvia, Sweden, Norway, Switzerland, France 10 events (7 individual, 3 relays)
1998 Ireland, Great Britain, Sweden, Poland, Slovakia, Estonia, Finland 13 events (10 individual, 3 relays).
2000 Japan, Australia, Ukraine, Finland, Portugal 12 events (9 individual, 3 relays)
2002 Belgium, Switzerland, Norway, Sweden, Hungary, Czech Republic 17 events (13 individual, 4 relays).
2004 Denmark, Sweden, Germany 12 events (9 individual, 3 relays)
2005 Great Britain, Japan, Italy 12 events (9 individual, 3 relays)
2006 Estonia, Denmark, France 12 events (9 individual, 3 relays)
2007 Finland, Norway, Sweden, Ukraine, Switzerland 10 events (all individual)
2008 Latvia, Norway, Czech Republic, Sweden, Switzerland 13 events (all individual)
2009 Finland, Norway, Hungary, Switzerland 9 events (all individual)
2010 Bulgaria, Finland, Sweden, Norway, France, Switzerland 12 events (all individual)
2011 Czech Republic, Finland, France, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland 10 events (all individual)
2012 Sweden, Switzerland, Norway, Finland 13 events (all individual)
2013 New Zealand, Norway, Sweden, Finland, Switzerland 13 events (all individual)
2014 Turkey, Spain, Portugal, Norway, Finland, Italy, Switzerland 14 events (all individual)
2015 Australia, Norway, Sweden, Scotland, Switzerland 14 events (11 individual, 3 sprint relays)
2016 Czech Republic, Poland, Sweden, Switzerland 14 events (10 individual, 4 sprint relays)
2017 Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Switzerland 15 events (10 individual, 5 relays)
2018 Switzerland, Latvia, Norway, Czech Republic 20 events (11 individual, 9 relays)
2019 Finland, Norway, Switzerland, China 13 events (9 individual, 4 relays)
2020 Switzerland, Estonia, Italy 9 events (7 individual, 2 relays)

Points distribution[edit]

The object of the World Cup is to collect points during the season. The 40 best runners in each event are awarded points, where the winner is awarded 100 points.[1] The current points distribution are as follows:

Rank 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40
Points 100 80 60 50 45 40 37 35 33 31 30 29 28 27 26 25 24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

World Cup overall results[edit]

Simone Niggli-Luder, nine-time winner
Tove Alexandersson won five consequite titles in 2014–2018 seasons
Hanne Staff won twice in 1998 and 2000

Women[edit]

Year 1st 2nd 3rd Notes
1986 Norway Ellen Sofie Olsvik Norway Jorunn Teigen Sweden Karin Rabe [2]
1988 Norway Ragnhild Bratberg Norway Brit Volden Czech Republic Jana Galikova [3]
1990 Norway Ragnhild Bente Andersen Norway Ragnhild Bratberg Sweden Katarina Borg [4]
1992 Sweden Marita Skogum Czech Republic Jana Cieslarova United Kingdom Yvette Hague [5]
1994 Sweden Marlena Jansson United Kingdom Yvette Hague Norway Hanne Staff [6]
1996 Sweden Gunilla Svärd Sweden Marlena Jansson Norway Hanne Staff [7]
1998 Norway Hanne Staff Finland Johanna Asklöf Sweden Katarina Borg [8]
2000 Norway Hanne Staff (2) Switzerland Simone Luder United Kingdom Heather Monro [9]
2002 Switzerland Simone Luder Switzerland Vroni König-Salmi Norway Hanne Staff [10]
2004 Switzerland Simone Niggli-Luder (2) Russia Tatiana Ryabkina Sweden Karolina Arewång-Höjsgaard [11]
2005 Switzerland Simone Niggli-Luder (3) Switzerland Vroni König-Salmi Norway Anne Margrethe Hausken [12]
2006 Switzerland Simone Niggli-Luder (4) Norway Marianne Andersen Finland Minna Kauppi [13]
2007 Switzerland Simone Niggli-Luder (5) Finland Heli Jukkola Finland Minna Kauppi
2008 Norway Anne Margrethe Hausken Finland Minna Kauppi Sweden Helena Jansson
2009 Switzerland Simone Niggli-Luder (6) Norway Marianne Andersen Sweden Helena Jansson
2010 Switzerland Simone Niggli-Luder (7) Sweden Helena Jansson Denmark Maja Alm
2011 Sweden Helena Jansson Finland Minna Kauppi Sweden Lena Eliasson
2012 Switzerland Simone Niggli-Luder (8) Finland Minna Kauppi Russia Tatiana Ryabkina
2013 Switzerland Simone Niggli-Luder (9) Sweden Tove Alexandersson Sweden Annika Billstam
2014 Sweden Tove Alexandersson Switzerland Judith Wyder Denmark Maja Alm
2015 Sweden Tove Alexandersson (2) Switzerland Sara Lüscher Ukraine Nadiya Volynska
2016 Sweden Tove Alexandersson (3) Switzerland Judith Wyder Denmark Maja Alm
2017 Sweden Tove Alexandersson (4) Russia Natalia Gemperle Switzerland Sabine Hauswirth
2018 Sweden Tove Alexandersson (5) Sweden Karolin Ohlsson Russia Natalia Gemperle
2019 Sweden Tove Alexandersson (6) Switzerland Simona Aebersold Russia Natalia Gemperle
Daniel Hubmann, a six-time winner
Matthias Kyburz won the title five times
Thierry Gueorgiou, winner twice in 2006 and 2007

Men[edit]

Year 1st 2nd 3rd Notes
1986 Sweden Kent Olsson Norway Øyvin Thon Sweden Michael Wehlin [2]
1988 Norway Øyvin Thon Sweden Jörgen Mårtensson Norway Håvard Tveite [3]
1990 Norway Håvard Tveite Sweden Niklas Löwegren Sweden Jörgen Mårtensson [4]
1992 Sweden Joakim Ingelsson Sweden Martin Johansson Norway Petter Thoresen [5]
1994 Norway Petter Thoresen Finland Janne Salmi Finland Mika Kuisma [6]
1996 Sweden Johan Ivarsson Sweden Jörgen Mårtensson Finland Timo Karppinen [7]
1998 Denmark Chris Terkelsen Sweden Johan Ivarsson Norway Bjørnar Valstad [8]
2000 Finland Jani Lakanen Norway Tore Sandvik Denmark Allan Mogensen [9]
2002 Norway Bjørnar Valstad Russia Michael Mamleev Finland Mats Haldin [10]
2004 Norway Holger Hott Johansen Russia Andrey Khramov Norway Øystein Kvaal Østerbø [11]
2005 Russia Andrey Khramov France Thierry Gueorgiou Switzerland Daniel Hubmann [12]
2006 France Thierry Gueorgiou Switzerland Daniel Hubmann Russia Valentin Novikov [13]
2007 France Thierry Gueorgiou (2) Norway Anders Nordberg Switzerland Daniel Hubmann
2008 Switzerland Daniel Hubmann France Thierry Gueorgiou Switzerland Matthias Merz
2009 Switzerland Daniel Hubmann (2) France Thierry Gueorgiou Sweden Peter Öberg
2010 Switzerland Daniel Hubmann (3) Switzerland Matthias Müller France Thierry Gueorgiou
2011 Switzerland Daniel Hubmann (4) France Thierry Gueorgiou Switzerland Matthias Merz
2012 Switzerland Matthias Kyburz Norway Olav Lundanes Switzerland Matthias Merz
2013 Switzerland Matthias Kyburz (2) Switzerland Daniel Hubmann Switzerland Fabian Hertner
2014 Switzerland Daniel Hubmann (5) Switzerland Fabian Hertner Switzerland Matthias Kyburz
2015 Switzerland Daniel Hubmann (6) Switzerland Matthias Kyburz Norway Olav Lundanes
2016 Switzerland Matthias Kyburz (3) Switzerland Daniel Hubmann Norway Olav Lundanes
2017 Switzerland Matthias Kyburz (4) Norway Olav Lundanes Switzerland Daniel Hubmann
2018 Switzerland Matthias Kyburz (5) Switzerland Daniel Hubmann Norway Olav Lundanes
2019 Sweden Gustav Bergman Switzerland Joey Hadorn Switzerland Daniel Hubmann

Records[edit]

Most overall wins[edit]

The table shows all winners of the overall World Cup who achieved minimum two top 3 finishes.

  • Active athletes are bolded.

Most race victories[edit]

This is a list of the orienteers who have won two or more World Cup races.

  • Results from the World Cup's inception in 1986 until the 1996 are incomplete.
  • Active athletes are bolded.
As of 29 October 2019

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Special Rules for the 2019 World Cup in Orienteering" (PDF). International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 21 March 2019.
  2. ^ a b "World Cup 1986 Overall". old.orienteering.org. International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 4 June 2019.
  3. ^ a b "World Cup 1988 Overall". old.orienteering.org. International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 4 June 2019.
  4. ^ a b "World Cup 1990 Overall". old.orienteering.org. International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 4 June 2019.
  5. ^ a b "World Cup 1992 Overall". old.orienteering.org. International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 4 June 2019.
  6. ^ a b "World Cup 1994 Overall". old.orienteering.org. International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 4 June 2019.
  7. ^ a b "World Cup 1996 Overall". old.orienteering.org. International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 4 June 2019.
  8. ^ a b "World Cup 1998 Overall". old.orienteering.org. International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 4 June 2019.
  9. ^ a b "World Cup 2000 Overall". old.orienteering.org. International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 4 June 2019.
  10. ^ a b "World Cup 2002 Overall". old.orienteering.org. International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 4 June 2019.
  11. ^ a b "World Cup 2004 Overall". old.orienteering.org. International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 4 June 2019.
  12. ^ a b "World Cup 2005 Overall". old.orienteering.org. International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 4 June 2019.
  13. ^ a b "World Cup 2006 Overall". old.orienteering.org. International Orienteering Federation. Retrieved 4 June 2019.