Orthodoxy by country

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Distribution of Orthodox Christianity in the world by country

There exist two distinct Christian communions known by the appellation "Orthodox," namely the Eastern Orthodox Church and Oriental Orthodoxy.

The various autocephalous and autonomous jurisdictions of the Eastern Orthodox Church are distinct in terms of administration and local culture, but are united in full communion with one another, hold the same beliefs, and also generally follow the same practices (the same rite). Some tensions exist in the philosophical differences between the New Calendarists and the Moderate Old Calendarists.

Oriental Orthodoxy also consists of several autocephalous and autonomous jurisdictions holding a single set of beliefs and united in full communion. However, they each have their own separate rites, and there are significant differences between their respective practices. Thus, there is more internal diversity of practice among the Oriental Orthodox than among the Eastern Orthodox.

Eastern Orthodoxy[edit]

Predominantly Eastern Orthodox Christian countries[edit]

The Eastern Orthodox Church is the largest single religious faith in:

Countries with a high percentage of Eastern Orthodox Christians include:

Eastern Orthodox churches (jurisdictions) in full communion[edit]

Eastern Orthodox primates[edit]

The following table includes the current primates (head bishops) of the autocephalous jurisdictions of the Eastern Orthodox Church, with their respective titles and episcopal sees. A primate may hold the title of Patriarch, Metropolitan, or Archbishop.

Title and episcopal see(s) Current primate In office since
Ecumenical Patriarch, Archbishop of Constantinople-New Rome and Primus inter pares Bartholomew I 1991
Pope and Patriarch of the Great City of Alexandria, Libya, Pentapolis, Ethiopia, all the land of Egypt, and all Africa Theodoros II 2004
Patriarch of Antioch and all the East John X (Yazigi) 2012
Patriarch of the Holy City of Jerusalem and all Palestine, and of Syria, Arabia, beyond the Jordan River, Cana of Galilee, and Sacred Zion Theophilus III 2005
Patriarch of Moscow and all Russia Kirill I 2009
Patriarch of All Georgia, Archbishop of Mtskheta-Tbilisi and Metropolitan bishop of Abkhazia and Pitsunda Ilia II 1977
Archbishop of Peć, Metropolitan of Belgrade and Karlovci, and Serbian Patriarch Irinej 2010
Patriarch of All Romania, Archbishop of Bucharest Daniel 2007
Metropolitan of Sofia and Patriarch of All Bulgaria Neofit 2013
Archbishop of New Justiniana and all Cyprus Chrysostomos II 2006
Archbishop of Athens and all Greece Ieronymos II 2008
Archbishop of Tirana and all Albania Anastasios 1992
Archbishop of Warsaw and Metropolitan of All Poland Sawa 1998
Archbishop of Prešov and Prague, Metropolitan of Czech lands and Slovakia Rastislav (cs) 2014
Archbishop of Washington, Metropolitan of All America and Canada Tikhon 2012

Oriental Orthodoxy[edit]

Distribution[edit]

Oriental Orthodoxy is the dominant religion in Armenia (94%), the ethnically Armenian Artsakh (95%), Ethiopia (61%, the total Christian population being 62%), and Eritrea (57%, the total Christian population being 64%).

Oriental Orthodoxy is especially the dominant religion in the two Ethiopian regions of Amhara (82%) and Tigray (96%), as well as the chartered city of Addis Ababa (82%). It is also important in Oromia Region (41%).

Oriental Orthodoxy is also one of two dominant religions in Eritrea (57%), especially in its highland regions Maekel Region (91%) and Debub Region (88%).

It is a significant minority religion in Egypt (15%), Sudan (5%, the total Christian population being 15%), Syria (3%, the total Christian population being 10%), Lebanon (2%, the total Christian population being 40%) and Kerala, India (1%, the total Christian population being 2.3%).[2]

Predominantly Oriental Orthodox Christian countries[edit]

Oriental Orthodoxy is the largest single religious faith in:

Countries with a high percentage of Oriental Orthodox Christians include:

Oriental Orthodox churches in full communion[edit]

Statistics[edit]

Country Christian Orthodox population[3][4] Orthodox percentage (%) of total population Orthodox percentage (%) of World Orthodox population
 Albania 240,000[5] 6.78 0.1
 Armenia 3,220,236 98.80 1.17
 Azerbaijan 260,000[5] 1.77 0.05
 Australia 567,680 2.43 0.26
 Belarus 4,800,000-5,900,000[5] 48.3-61.5[5] 2.3[5]
 Bosnia and Herzegovina 1,440,000[5] 31 0.49
 Brazil 130,000[5] 0.4 0.02
 Bulgaria 4,374,135-6,220,000[5] 59.4[6]-83.0[5] 2.4[5]
 Canada 581,553 1.70 0.21
 Croatia 194,134 4.40 0.07
 Cyprus 625,444 78 0.23
 Czech Republic 21,002 0.2 0.008
 Egypt 7,609,500 9 2.38
 Eritrea 3,030,000 57 1.2
 Estonia 250,000[5] 13.7 0.06
 Ethiopia 45,000,000 55 13.9[5]
 Finland 59,000 1.1 0.02
 Georgia 3,820,000[5] 87.8[5] 1.5[5]
 Germany 1,140,000[5] 1.5 0.6
 Greece 10,030,000[5] 88.3[5] 3.7[5]
 India 3,800,059 0.4 1.38
 Iran 250,000[7]-300,000[8] 0.1 0.03
 Iraq 629,340 2 0.23
 Israel To be determined over 1
 Jordan 310,656 4.8 0.11
 Kazakhstan 4,193,271 26.19 1.52
 Kyrgyzstan 540,000[5] 8.26 0.16
 Latvia 370,000[5] 15.70 0.13
 Lebanon 851,000 8 0.31
 Lithuania 141,821 4.05 0.05
 Macedonia, Republic of 1,330,000[5] 64.80 0.48
 Moldova 3,321,853 93.30 1.20
 Montenegro 446,858 72.07 0.16
 Norway 9,894 0.02 0.004
 Palestine 118,057 3 0.04
 Poland 763,347 2 0.28
 Romania 18,750,000[5] 87.3[5] 7.2[5]
 Russia 58,190,191-99,775,000[5] 41-77.0[9][10] 39.0[5]
 Serbia 6,630,000[5] 86.3[5] 3.2[5]
 Slovakia 50,363 0.9 0.02
 Sweden 103,027 1.1 0.04
 Syria 1,800,400 8 0.07
 Tajikistan 80,000[5] 1.18 0.03
 Turkey 180,000[11][5] 0.1 0.03
 Turkmenistan 270,000[5] 2 0.04
 Ukraine 27,802,000-34,850,000[5] 65.4[1]-76.7[5] 13.4[5]
 United States 5,269,864 1.7 1.91
 Uzbekistan 470,000[5] 1.79 0.18
World 260,000,000[5] 4[5] 100

See also[edit]

Other religions:

General:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b РЕЛІГІЯ, ЦЕРКВА, СУСПІЛЬСТВО І ДЕРЖАВА: ДВА РОКИ ПІСЛЯ МАЙДАНУ (Religion, Church, Society and State: Two Years after Maidan), 2016 report by Razumkov Center in collaboration with the All-Ukrainian Council of Churches. pp. 27-29. Archived.
  2. ^ [1]
  3. ^ [2]
  4. ^ Eastern Orthodox Church#Number of adherents
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am "Pewforum: Christianity (2010)" (PDF). Retrieved 2014-05-14. 
  6. ^ "Field Listing :: Religions". The World Factbook. CIA. Retrieved 26 January 2015. 
  7. ^ Price, Massoume (December 2002). "History of Christians and Christianity in Iran". Christianity in Iran. FarsiNet Inc. Retrieved 1 December 2009. 
  8. ^ U.S. State Department (2009-10-26). "Iran – International Religious Freedom Report 2009". The Office of Electronic Information, Bureau of Public Affairs. Retrieved 2009-12-01. 
  9. ^ http://wciom.ru/index.php?id=268&uid=13365 VTSIOM
  10. ^ http://www.pewforum.org/2011/12/19/global-christianity-exec/ Pew
  11. ^ "Religions". Central Intelligence Agency. Retrieved 9 February 2013.