Orville Caldwell

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Orville Caldwell
Sackcloth and Scarlet 1925 Lobby Card.jpg
Lobby card for Sackcloth and Scarlet (1925)
Born
Orville Robert Caldwell

(1896-02-08)February 8, 1896
Oakland, California, U.S.
DiedSeptember 24, 1967(1967-09-24) (aged 71)
NationalityAmerican
OccupationActor, politician
Years active1923–1938, 1942-1951
Spouse(s)Audrey Anderson (m. 1917-1967)

Orville Caldwell (1896-1967) was an American politician and actor on the stage and screen. He appeared in 21 films between 1923 and 1938, but was inactive for 7 years starting in 1928 during the transition from silent film to sound film.[1] He is best known for his role as Tony in The Patsy (1928) costarring with Marion Davies.[2]

Following his departure from film, Caldwell transitioned to politics, serving as the first Deputy Mayor of Los Angeles from 1942 to 1951.[3]

Filmography[edit]

Silent films[edit]

Year Title Role
1923 The Lonely Road Warren Wade
1923 The Scarlet Lily Lawson Dean
1923 The French Doll Wellington Wick
1923 The Six-Fifty Dan Taylor
1924 Daughters of the Night Billy Roberts
1925 Sackcloth and Scarlet Stephen Edwards
1926 The Wives of the Prophet Howard Brice
1926 Flame of the Argentine Dan Prescott
1927 Judgement of the Hills Brant Dennison
1927 The Harvester David Langston
1928 The Little Yellow House Rob Hollis
1928 The Patsy Tony Anderson

Sound films[edit]

Year Title Role Notes
1935 His Family Tree Julius - Mayor's Henchman
1935 Three Kids and a Queen Detective uncredited
1937 She's No Lady Inspector uncredited
1937 Big City Comet Cab Driver uncredited
1937 The Last Gangster Guard uncredited
1937 Mannequin Stage Manager uncredited
1938 Boys Town Warden uncredited
1938 Just Around the Corner Henshaw Assistant uncredited
1938 The Last Warning Inspector Wilson

Political career[edit]

Caldwell served as Deputy Mayor of Los Angeles from 1942 to 1951.

In response to an influx of migration of African Americans to Los Angeles during the Second World War, Caldwell proposed a ban on African American immigration into California.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Orville Caldwell". IMDB. Retrieved 2016-01-07.
  2. ^ "Orville Caldwell". Obscure Hollywood. Retrieved 2016-01-07.
  3. ^ "City of Los Angeles Elected Officials". Retrieved 2016-01-07.
  4. ^ Josh Sides (12 June 2006). L.A. City Limits: African American Los Angeles from the Great Depression to the Present. University of California Press. pp. 52–. ISBN 978-0-520-24830-4.