Orwell Prize

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The Orwell Prize, based at University College London, is a British prize for political writing of outstanding quality. Three prizes are awarded each year: one for a book and one for journalism and one for 'Exposing Britain's Social Evils' (established 2015); between 2009 and 2012, a third prize was awarded for blogging. In each case, the winner is the short-listed entry which comes closest to George Orwell's own ambition to "make political writing into an art".[1]

In 2014, the Youth Orwell Prize was launched, targeted at school years 9 to 13 in order to "support and inspire a new generation of politically engaged young writers".[2] In 2015, The Orwell Prize for Exposing Britain's Social Evils, sponsored and supported by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, was launched.[3]

Bernard Crick founded the prize in 1993, using money from the royalties of the hardback edition of his biography of Orwell. Its sponsors are Orwell's adopted son Richard Blair, The Political Quarterly, and A. M. Heath & Company.[4] The Prize was formerly sponsored by the Media Standards Trust.[5] Crick remained Chair of the judges until 2006; since 2007, the media historian Professor Jean Seaton has been the Director of the prize.[6]

Winners and shortlists[edit]

Book category (1994 - )[edit]

Journalism category (1994 - )[edit]

Prize for Exposing Britain’s Social Evils (2015 - )[edit]

Blog category (2009-2012)[edit]

Special awards[edit]

In 2007, BBC's Newsnight programme was given a special award, the judges noting: "When we were discussing the many very fine pieces of journalism that were submitted Newsnight just spontaneously emerged in our deliberations as the most precious and authoritative home for proper reporting of important stories, beautifully and intelligently crafted by journalists of rare distinction." In 2008, Clive James was given a special award. In 2009, Tony Judt was given a lifetime achievement award. A posthumous award was made to Christopher Hitchens in 2012, his book Arguably having been longlisted that year.[229] In 2014, Jonathan Freedland was given a special award, after having been shortlisted for the Journalism Prize that year.

Controversy[edit]

In 2008 the winner in the Journalism category was Johann Hari. In July 2011 the Orwell Prize Council decided to revoke Hari's award and withdraw the prize. Public announcement was delayed as Hari was then under investigation by The Independent for professional misconduct.[230] In September 2011 Hari announced that he was returning his prize "as an act of contrition for the errors I made elsewhere, in my interviews", although he "stands by the articles that won the prize".[231] A few weeks later, the Council of the Orwell Prize confirmed that Hari had returned the plaque but not the £2000 prize money, and issued a statement that one of the articles submitted for the prize, "How multiculturalism is betraying women", published by the Independent in April 2007, "contained inaccuracies and conflated different parts of someone else's story (specifically, a report in Der Spiegel)".[232]

Hari did not initially return the prize money of £2000.[233] He later offered to repay the money, but Political Quarterly, responsible for paying the prize money in 2008, instead invited Hari to make a donation to English PEN, of which George Orwell was a member. Hari arranged with English PEN to make a donation equal to the value of the prize, to be paid in installments once Hari returned to work at The Independent.[234] However, Hari did not return to work at The Independent.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The award". The Orwell Prize. Retrieved 27 January 2013. 
  2. ^ "The Orwell Youth Prize". The Orwell Prize. Retrieved 2016-05-15. 
  3. ^ "The Orwell Prize for Exposing Britain's Social Evils". The Orwell Prize. Retrieved 2016-01-06. 
  4. ^ "The sponsors". The Orwell Prize. Retrieved 27 January 2013. 
  5. ^ "A brief history". The Orwell Prize. Retrieved 2016-01-06. 
  6. ^ "A Brief History". TheOrwellPrize.co.uk. 
  7. ^ "The Baltic Revolution: Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and the Path to Independence". The Orwell Prize. 1994-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-24. 
  8. ^ "In Search of a State: Catholics in Northern Ireland". The Orwell Prize. 1995-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-24. 
  9. ^ "Season of Blood: A Rwandan Journey". The Orwell Prize. 1996-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-24. 
  10. ^ "Mukiwa: A White Boy in Africa". The Orwell Prize. 1997-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-24. 
  11. ^ "Jennie Lee: A Life". The Orwell Prize. 1998-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-24. 
  12. ^ "Alexander Solzhenitsyn: A Century in His Life". The Orwell Prize. 1999-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-24. 
  13. ^ "The Case of Stephen Lawrence". The Orwell Prize. 2000-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-24. 
  14. ^ "Virtual War: Kosovo and Beyond". The Orwell Prize. 2001-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-24. 
  15. ^ "Anthony Blunt: His Lives". The Orwell Prize. 2002-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-24. 
  16. ^ "The Irish Story: Telling Tales and Making it Up in Ireland". The Orwell Prize. 2002-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  17. ^ "Hoo-Hahs and Passing Frenzies: Collected Journalism 1991-2001". The Orwell Prize. 2003-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-24. 
  18. ^ "Chance Witness: An Outsider's Life in Politics". The Orwell Prize. 2003-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  19. ^ "London Orbital: A Walk Around the M25". The Orwell Prize. 2003-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  20. ^ "Marianne in Chains: In Search of the German Occupation 1940-45". The Orwell Prize. 2003-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  21. ^ "Patriots: National Identity in Britain 1940-2000". The Orwell Prize. 2003-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  22. ^ "Stone Voices: The Search for Scotland". The Orwell Prize. 2003-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  23. ^ "The Breaking of Nations: Order and Chaos in the Twenty-First Century". The Orwell Prize. 2004-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-24. 
  24. ^ "Brick Lane". The Orwell Prize. 2004-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  25. ^ "Margaret Thatcher – Volume Two: The Iron Lady by John Campbell". The Orwell Prize. 2004-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  26. ^ "Rising '44: The Battle For Warsaw". The Orwell Prize. 2004-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  27. ^ "Supping with the Devils: Political Journalism from Thatcher to Blair". The Orwell Prize. 2004-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  28. ^ "The Likes of Us: A Biography of the White Working Class". The Orwell Prize. 2005-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-24. 
  29. ^ "Free World". The Orwell Prize. 2010-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  30. ^ "Just Law". The Orwell Prize. 2005-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  31. ^ "My Trade: A Short History of British Journalism". The Orwell Prize. 2005-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  32. ^ "Occidentalism: A Short History of Anti-Westernism". The Orwell Prize. 2005-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  33. ^ "Wartime: Britain 1939-1945". The Orwell Prize. 2005-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  34. ^ "Moses, Citizen and Me". The Orwell Prize. 2006-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-24. 
  35. ^ "BBC NEWS | Africa | Award for Sierra Leone war novel". news.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 2017-05-24. 
  36. ^ "Urban Grimshaw and The Shed Crew". The Orwell Prize. 2010-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  37. ^ "The Secret of Bryn Estyn: The Making of a Modern Witch Hunt". The Orwell Prize. 2010-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  38. ^ "I Didn't Do It For You: How the World Used and Abused a Small African Nation". The Orwell Prize. 2010-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  39. ^ "Frontline: The True Story of the British Mavericks Who Changed the Face of War Reporting". The Orwell Prize. 2010-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  40. ^ "Black Gold of the Sun: Searching for Home in England and Africa". The Orwell Prize. 2010-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  41. ^ "Having It So Good: Britain in the Fifties". The Orwell Prize. 2007-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-24. 
  42. ^ "Thatcher and Sons: A Revolution in Three Acts". The Orwell Prize. 2010-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  43. ^ "Occupational Hazards: My Time Governing in Iraq". The Orwell Prize. 2010-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  44. ^ "Lions, Donkeys And Dinosaurs: Waste and Blundering in the Military". The Orwell Prize. 2010-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  45. ^ "Bad Faith: A Forgotten History of Family and Fatherland". The Orwell Prize. 2010-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  46. ^ "Alexis de Tocqueville: Prophet of Democracy in the Age of Revolution". The Orwell Prize. 2010-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  47. ^ "Palestinian Walks: Notes on a Vanishing Landscape". The Orwell Prize. 2008-10-17. Retrieved 2017-05-24. 
  48. ^ "What's Left? How The Left Lost Its Way". The Orwell Prize. 2008-10-17. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  49. ^ "Wild: An Elemental Journey". The Orwell Prize. 2008-10-17. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  50. ^ "William Wilberforce: The Life of the Great Anti-Slave Trade Campaigner". The Orwell Prize. 2008-10-17. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  51. ^ "The Islamist: Why I Joined Radical Islam in Britain, What I Saw Inside and Why I Left". The Orwell Prize. 2008-10-17. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  52. ^ "Two Caravans". The Orwell Prize. 2008-10-17. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  53. ^ "Bad Men: Guantanamo Bay and the Secret Prisons". The Orwell Prize. 2008-10-17. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  54. ^ "Fishing in Utopia: Sweden & The Future That Disappeared". The Orwell Prize. 2009-10-16. Retrieved 2017-05-24. 
  55. ^ Flood, Alison (2009-04-22). "Guardian journalist wins Orwell book prize". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 2017-05-24. 
  56. ^ "Reappraisals: Reflections on the Forgotten Twentieth Century". The Orwell Prize. 2010-10-16. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  57. ^ "Stalin's Children: Three Generations of Love and War". The Orwell Prize. 2010-10-16. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  58. ^ "Chinese Whispers: The True Story Behind Britain's Hidden Army of Labour". The Orwell Prize. 2010-10-16. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  59. ^ "Descent into Chaos: Pakistan, Afghanistan and the threat to global security". The Orwell Prize. 2010-10-16. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  60. ^ "The White War: Life and Death on the Italian Front 1915-1919". The Orwell Prize. 2010-10-16. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  61. ^ "Keeper: A Book About Memory, Identity, Isolation, Wordsworth and Cake…". The Orwell Prize. 2010-10-14. Retrieved 2017-05-24. 
  62. ^ "Rebel Land: Among Turkey's Forgotten Peoples". The Orwell Prize. 2010-10-14. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  63. ^ "An Elegy for Easterly". The Orwell Prize. 2010-10-14. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  64. ^ "Freedom for Sale: How We Made Money and Lost Our Liberty". The Orwell Prize. 2010-10-14. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  65. ^ "From Fatwa to Jihad: The Rushdie Affair and Its Legacy". The Orwell Prize. 2010-10-14. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  66. ^ "It's Our Turn to Eat: The Story of a Kenyan Whistle Blower". The Orwell Prize. 2010-10-14. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  67. ^ "The Rule of Law". The Orwell Prize. 2011-03-29. Retrieved 2017-05-24. 
  68. ^ Flood, Alison (2011-05-17). "Orwell prize goes to Tom Bingham". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 2017-05-24. 
  69. ^ "Death to the Dictator!: Witnessing Iran's election and the Crippling of the Islamic Republic". The Orwell Prize. 2011-03-29. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  70. ^ "Hitch-22". The Orwell Prize. 2011-03-29. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  71. ^ "Let Our Fame Be Great: Journeys among the defiant people of the Caucasus". The Orwell Prize. 2011-03-29. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  72. ^ "Supermac: The Life of Harold Macmillan". The Orwell Prize. 2011-03-29. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  73. ^ "The Betrayal". The Orwell Prize. 2011-03-29. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  74. ^ "Dead Men Risen". The Orwell Prize. 2012-02-28. Retrieved 2017-05-24. 
  75. ^ "Afghan war book wins Orwell Prize for political writing". BBC News. 2012-05-23. Retrieved 2017-05-24. 
  76. ^ "DarkMarket: CyberThieves, CyberCops and You". The Orwell Prize. 2012-02-28. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  77. ^ "Hood Rat". The Orwell Prize. 2012-02-28. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  78. ^ "People Who Eat Darkness: The Fate of Lucie Blackman". The Orwell Prize. 2012-02-28. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  79. ^ "The Beautiful and the Damned: Life in the New India". The Orwell Prize. 2012-02-28. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  80. ^ "The Opium War". The Orwell Prize. 2012-02-28. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  81. ^ "A Very British Killing: The Death of Baha Mousa". The Orwell Prize. 2013-03-20. Retrieved 2017-05-24. 
  82. ^ Flood, Alison (2013-05-15). "Orwell prize goes to 'chilling' study of Baha Mousa's death". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 2017-05-24. 
  83. ^ "Burying the Typewriter". The Orwell Prize. 2013-03-20. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  84. ^ "From the Ruins of the Empire". The Orwell Prize. 2013-03-20. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  85. ^ "Injustice". The Orwell Prize. 2013-03-20. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  86. ^ "Leaving Alexandria". The Orwell Prize. 2013-03-20. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  87. ^ "Occupation Diaries". The Orwell Prize. 2013-03-20. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  88. ^ "On the Front Line: The Collected Journalism of Marie Colvin". The Orwell Prize. 2013-03-20. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  89. ^ Alison Flood (21 May 2014). "Alan Johnson wins Orwell political writing prize for memoir This Boy". The Guardian. Retrieved 22 May 2014. 
  90. ^ "This Boy". The Orwell Prize. 2014-05-20. Retrieved 2017-05-24. 
  91. ^ "Coolie Woman". The Orwell Prize. 2014-04-23. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  92. ^ "Margaret Thatcher: the Authorized Biography". The Orwell Prize. 2014-04-23. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  93. ^ "The British Dream". The Orwell Prize. 2014-04-23. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  94. ^ "The Tragedy of Liberation". The Orwell Prize. 2014-04-23. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  95. ^ "The World's Most Dangerous Place". The Orwell Prize. 2014-04-23. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  96. ^ "Private Island: Why Britain Now Belongs to Someone Else". The Orwell Prize. 2015-03-25. Retrieved 2017-05-24. 
  97. ^ Flood, Alison (2015-05-21). "James Meek wins Orwell prize for political writing". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 2017-05-24. 
  98. ^ "Capital". The Orwell Prize. 2015-03-25. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  99. ^ "Hack Attack". The Orwell Prize. 2015-03-25. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  100. ^ "In Plain Sight". The Orwell Prize. 2015-03-25. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  101. ^ "Modernity Britain". The Orwell Prize. 2015-03-25. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  102. ^ "The People's Republic of Amnesia". The Orwell Prize. 2015-03-25. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  103. ^ "The Invention of Russia". The Orwell Prize. 2016-03-07. Retrieved 2017-05-24. 
  104. ^ Flood, Alison (2016-05-26). "'Most Orwellian winner yet': The Invention of Russia takes Orwell prize". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 2017-05-24. 
  105. ^ "Circling the Square". The Orwell Prize. 2016-03-07. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  106. ^ "Other People's Money". The Orwell Prize. 2016-03-07. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  107. ^ "The New Threat from Islamic Militancy". The Orwell Prize. 2016-03-07. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  108. ^ "The Tears of the Rajas". The Orwell Prize. 2016-03-07. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  109. ^ "The Unravelling". The Orwell Prize. 2016-03-07. Retrieved 2017-05-25. 
  110. ^ "Citizen Clem: A Biography of Attlee". The Orwell Prize. 2017-05-15. Retrieved 2017-07-22. 
  111. ^ "The Seven". The Orwell Prize. 2017-05-15. Retrieved 2017-07-22. 
  112. ^ "All Out War". The Orwell Prize. 2017-05-15. Retrieved 2017-07-22. 
  113. ^ "Island Story". The Orwell Prize. 2017-05-15. Retrieved 2017-07-22. 
  114. ^ "And the Sun Shines Now". The Orwell Prize. 2017-05-15. Retrieved 2017-07-22. 
  115. ^ "Another Day in the Death of America". The Orwell Prize. 2017-05-15. Retrieved 2017-07-22. 
  116. ^ a b c d e "Fine shortlisted for Orwell Prize 2018 | Books+Publishing". Retrieved 2018-06-28. 
  117. ^ Flood, Alison (2018-06-25). "Orwell books prize goes to Poverty Safari by Scottish rapper Loki". the Guardian. Retrieved 2018-06-28. 
  118. ^ "Neal Ascherson". The Orwell Prize. 1994-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  119. ^ "Paul Foot and Tim Laxton". The Orwell Prize. 1995-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  120. ^ "Melanie Phillips". The Orwell Prize. 1996-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  121. ^ "Ian Bell". The Orwell Prize. 1997-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  122. ^ "Ian Bell: Scottish journalist whose nationalist writing won him the George Orwell Prize". The Independent. 2015-12-17. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  123. ^ "Polly Toynbee". The Orwell Prize. 1998-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  124. ^ "Another prestigious award for journalism". The Independent. 2000-04-14. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  125. ^ "David McKittrick". The Orwell Prize. 2000-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  126. ^ "David Aaronovitch". The Orwell Prize. 2001-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  127. ^ "Yasmin Alibhai-Brown". The Orwell Prize. 2002-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  128. ^ "'Independent' writers are honoured in George Orwell awards". The Independent. 2002-04-16. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  129. ^ "Brian Sewell". The Orwell Prize. 2003-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  130. ^ "Vanora Bennett". The Orwell Prize. 2004-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  131. ^ "Matthew Parris". The Orwell Prize. 2005-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  132. ^ "Timothy Garton Ash". The Orwell Prize. 2006-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  133. ^ Jones, Sam (2006-04-05). "Garton Ash wins Orwell prize". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  134. ^ "Steve Richards". The Orwell Prize. 2006-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  135. ^ "Oliver Burkeman". The Orwell Prize. 2006-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  136. ^ "Lesley Riddoch". The Orwell Prize. 2006-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  137. ^ "Jonathan Freedland". The Orwell Prize. 2006-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  138. ^ "Bronwen Maddox". The Orwell Prize. 2006-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  139. ^ "Peter Beaumont". The Orwell Prize. 2007-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  140. ^ Dowell, Ben (2007-04-25). "Beaumont wins Orwell prize". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  141. ^ "John Rentoul". The Orwell Prize. 2007-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  142. ^ "Martin Bright". The Orwell Prize. 2007-10-18. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  143. ^ Trilling, Daniel (20 May 2010). "Peter Hitchens wins the Orwell Prize". New Statesman. Retrieved 25 May 2010. 
  144. ^ "Patrick Cockburn". The Orwell Prize. 2009-10-16. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  145. ^ "Cockburn wins top journalism award". The Independent. 2009-04-24. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  146. ^ "Peter Oborne". The Orwell Prize. 2009-10-16. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  147. ^ "Peter Hitchens". The Orwell Prize. 2009-10-16. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  148. ^ "Henry Porter". The Orwell Prize. 2009-10-16. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  149. ^ "Donald Macintyre". The Orwell Prize. 2009-10-16. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  150. ^ "Catherine Bennett". The Orwell Prize. 2009-10-16. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  151. ^ "Peter Hitchens". The Orwell Prize. 2010-10-14. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  152. ^ "Peter Hitchens wins Orwell Prize". www.newstatesman.com. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  153. ^ "Paul Lewis". The Orwell Prize. 2010-10-14. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  154. ^ "John Arlidge". The Orwell Prize. 2010-10-14. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  155. ^ "Hamish McRae". The Orwell Prize. 2010-10-14. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  156. ^ "David Reynolds". The Orwell Prize. 2010-10-16. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  157. ^ "Anthony Loyd". The Orwell Prize. 2010-10-14. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  158. ^ "Amelia Gentleman". The Orwell Prize. 2010-10-14. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  159. ^ "Jenni Russell". The Orwell Prize. 2011-03-29. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  160. ^ Deans, Jason (2011-05-18). "Jenni Russell wins Orwell prize for political journalism". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  161. ^ "Rachel Shabi". The Orwell Prize. 2011-03-29. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  162. ^ "Philip Collins". The Orwell Prize. 2011-03-29. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  163. ^ "Gideon Rachman". The Orwell Prize. 2011-03-29. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  164. ^ "Declan Walsh". The Orwell Prize. 2011-03-29. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  165. ^ "Catherine Mayer". The Orwell Prize. 2011-03-29. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  166. ^ "Amelia Gentleman". The Orwell Prize. 2011-03-29. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  167. ^ "Amelia Gentleman". The Orwell Prize. 2012-02-28. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  168. ^ Jones, Sam (2012-05-24). "Guardian journalist Amelia Gentleman wins Orwell prize". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  169. ^ "Edward Docx". The Orwell Prize. 2012-02-28. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  170. ^ "Daniel Finkelstein". The Orwell Prize. 2012-02-28. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  171. ^ "David James Smith". The Orwell Prize. 2012-02-28. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  172. ^ "Simon Kuper". The Orwell Prize. 2012-02-28. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  173. ^ "Paul Lewis". The Orwell Prize. 2012-02-28. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  174. ^ "Andrew Norfolk". The Orwell Prize. 2013-03-20. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  175. ^ "Tom Bergin". The Orwell Prize. 2013-03-20. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  176. ^ Devlin, Mike. "Journalist Wins Orwell Prize for Investigative Journalism - Stephensons Solicitors LLP". Stephensons Solicitors LLP. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  177. ^ "Kim Sengupta". The Orwell Prize. 2013-03-20. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  178. ^ "Jamil Anderlini". The Orwell Prize. 2013-03-20. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  179. ^ "Ian Cobain". The Orwell Prize. 2013-03-20. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  180. ^ "Christina Patterson". The Orwell Prize. 2013-03-20. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  181. ^ "Ghaith Abdul-Ahad". The Orwell Prize. 2014-05-20. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  182. ^ Williams, Martin (2014-05-21). "Two Guardian journalists win Orwell prize for journalism". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  183. ^ "James Astill". The Orwell Prize. 2014-03-26. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  184. ^ "Jonathan Freedland". The Orwell Prize. 2014-03-26. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  185. ^ "Aditya Chakrabortty". The Orwell Prize. 2014-03-26. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  186. ^ "Mary Riddell". The Orwell Prize. 2014-03-26. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  187. ^ "AA Gill". The Orwell Prize. 2014-03-26. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  188. ^ "Gideon Rachman". The Orwell Prize. 2014-03-26. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  189. ^ "Martin Chulov". The Orwell Prize. 2015-03-25. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  190. ^ Ratcliffe, Rebecca (2015-05-21). "Guardian journalist Martin Chulov wins Orwell prize for Middle East coverage". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  191. ^ "Rosie Blau". The Orwell Prize. 2015-03-25. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  192. ^ "Rebecca Omonira-Oyekanmi". The Orwell Prize. 2015-03-25. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  193. ^ "Peter Ross". The Orwell Prize. 2015-03-25. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  194. ^ "Mary Riddell". The Orwell Prize. 2015-03-25. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  195. ^ "Kim Sengupta". The Orwell Prize. 2015-03-25. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  196. ^ "Iona Craig". The Orwell Prize. 2016-03-02. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  197. ^ "Gideon Rachman". The Orwell Prize. 2016-03-02. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  198. ^ "Gideon Rachman wins 2016 Orwell Prize for journalism". Financial Times. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  199. ^ "Alumna wins prestigious Orwell Prize for Journalism". City, University of London. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  200. ^ "Douglas Murray". The Orwell Prize. 2016-07-22. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  201. ^ "Oliver Bullough". The Orwell Prize. 2016-03-02. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  202. ^ "David Gardner". The Orwell Prize. 2016-03-02. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  203. ^ "Shiraz Maher". The Orwell Prize. 2016-03-02. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  204. ^ "Louise Tickle". The Orwell Prize. 2016-03-02. Retrieved 2017-05-26. 
  205. ^ "Fintan O'Toole". The Orwell Prize. 2017-05-15. Retrieved 2017-07-22. 
  206. ^ "Rosie Blau". The Orwell Prize. 2017-05-15. Retrieved 2017-07-22. 
  207. ^ "Carole Cadwalldar". The Orwell Prize. 2017-05-15. Retrieved 2017-07-22. 
  208. ^ "Aditya Chakrabortty". The Orwell Prize. 2017-05-15. Retrieved 2017-07-22. 
  209. ^ "Nick Cohen". The Orwell Prize. 2017-05-15. Retrieved 2017-07-22. 
  210. ^ "John Harris". The Orwell Prize. 2017-05-15. Retrieved 2017-07-22. 
  211. ^ "Paul Wood". The Orwell Prize. 2017-05-15. Retrieved 2017-07-22. 
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