Oscar Casares

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Oscar Casares
Born (1964-05-07) May 7, 1964 (age 53)
Brownsville, Texas
Occupation Author, Professor of Creative Writing
Language English
Nationality American

Oscar Casares (born May 7, 1964) is an American writer and an associate professor of creative writing.[1] He is the author of Brownsville: Stories and Amigoland. Casares teaches at the University of Texas at Austin where he is director of the Creative Writing Program.[2]

Honors[edit]

  • National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship (2006)
  • James A. Michener Award, Copernicus Society of America, Iowa Writers' Workshop (2002)[3]
  • Dobie Paisano Fellowship, Texas Institute of Letters, University of Texas (2002)[4]

Bibliography[edit]

Books[edit]

Selected Essays[edit]

  • "Imaginary Friends," Texas Monthly, December 2010[5]
  • "The Departed," Texas Monthly, April 2010[6]
  • "You Must Read This: The Burning Plain," National Public Radio, October 2009[7]
  • "Grass Roots," Texas Monthly, December 2008[8]
  • "Ready for Some Futbol?", Texas Monthly, November 2006[9]
  • "In the Year 1974", Texas Monthly, March 2005 [10]
  • "Crossing the Border Without Losing Your Past," New York Times, September 2003[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Smith, Evan (December 23, 2004). "Novelist Oscar Casares". Texas Monthly. 
  2. ^ "Distinguished alumni announced". The Brownsville Herald. August 11, 2011. 
  3. ^ Wizda Vane, Sharyn (March 2, 2003). "The stories of his life". Austin American-Statesman. 
  4. ^ Badgley, Shawn (June 14, 2002). "The 2002-03 Dobie Paisano Fellows". Austin Chronicle. 
  5. ^ Casares, Oscar (December 2010). "Imaginary Friends". Texas Monthly. 
  6. ^ Casares, Oscar (April 2010). "The Departed". Texas Monthly. 
  7. ^ Casares, Oscar (October 15, 2009). "A Wild, 'Burning' Journey Back To Old Mexico". NPR. Retrieved 3 October 2011. 
  8. ^ Casares, Oscar (December 2008). "Grass Roots". Texas Monthly. 
  9. ^ Oscar, Casares (November 2006). "Ready for some futbol?". Texas Monthly (November 2006): 130–142. Retrieved 22 September 2011. 
  10. ^ Casares, Oscar. "In the year 1974". Texas Monthly. Retrieved 22 September 2011. 
  11. ^ Casares, Oscar (September 16, 2003). "Crossing the Border Without Losing the Past". New York Times. Retrieved 3 October 2011.