Oscar Drouin

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Oscar Drouin
Oscar Drouin.png
Member of the Legislative Assembly of Quebec for Québec-Est
In office
1928–1944
Preceded by Louis-Alfred Létourneau
Succeeded by Henri-Paul Drouin
Personal details
Born (1890-09-29)September 29, 1890
Quebec City, Quebec
Died July 16, 1953(1953-07-16) (aged 62)
Quebec City, Quebec
Nationality French Canadian
Political party Liberal
Action libérale nationale
Union Nationale

Oscar Drouin (September 29, 1890 – July 16, 1953) was a politician in Quebec, Canada.[1]

Background[edit]

He was born on September 29, 1890 in Quebec City.

Member of the legislature[edit]

Drouin won a by-election in 1928 and became the Liberal Member of the Legislative Assembly of Quebec for the district of Québec-Est. He was re-elected in the 1931 general election.

He joined the newly formed Action libérale nationale (ALN) in 1934 and was re-elected as a candidate of that party in the 1935 election.

After the ALN merged with the Conservative Party to form the Union Nationale, Drouin became Maurice Duplessis's campaign manager. He won re-election in the 1936 election and Duplessis became Premier.

Mayoral candidate[edit]

Drouin was a mayoral candidate in Quebec City in 1934. He was defeated by Joseph-Ernest Grégoire.

Member of the Cabinet[edit]

Drouin was appointed to the Cabinet. He became the Minister of Lands and Forests, but resigned in 1937. He and colleagues René Chaloult, Joseph-Ernest Grégoire, Philippe Hamel and Adolphe Marcoux left the Union Nationale.[2] Drouin eventually switched Liberal and was re-elected in the 1939 election. He served as Minister of Municipal Affairs in Premier Adélard Godbout's Cabinet.

Federal politics[edit]

Droin did not run for re-election in the 1944 election. He was succeeded by his brother Henri-Paul. He ran as an Independent candidate in the federal district of Matapédia—Matane in the 1945 federal election, but lost.

Death[edit]

Drouin died on July 16, 1953.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Biography". Dictionnaire des parlementaires du Québec de 1792 à nos jours (in French). National Assembly of Quebec. 
  2. ^ Chronologie parlementaire depuis 1791 (1937-1939)