Oscar Fernandez-Taranco

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Oscar Fernandez-Taranco(born in 1957) is the United Nations Assistant Secretary-General for Peacebuilding Support. [1] Prior to this appointment of 2 September 2014, he served as Assistant Secretary-General for Political Affairs in the UN Department of Political Affairs.[2]

A national of Argentina, Fernandez-Taranco has studied economics and urban-regional economic planning at Cornell University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Biographical Information[edit]

Fernandez-Taranco has over 25 years of experience with the United Nations and has served in a variety of functions in various locations.

Prior to his appointment as Assistant Secretary-General for Political Affairs, he was Resident Coordinator in the United Republic of Tanzania. Between 1998 and 2001, he served as Resident Representative, UN Resident Coordinator and Deputy Special Representative of the Secretary-General in Haiti.

From 1994 to 1998, he was Deputy Special Representative of the Administrator of the West Bank and Gaza Programme of Assistance to the Palestinian people. For five years, he also served as Deputy Assistant Administrator and Deputy Regional Director in the Regional Bureau of Arab States in the United Nations Development Programme.

He joined the UN as a volunteer in Benin. His effort to solve political crisis in Bangladesh is praiseworthy.

Fernandez-Taranco is a member of the Interpeace Governing Council.[3]

Oscar Fernandez Taranco is married to Aissata Traore, a French Malian Social Scientist and Realtor. They have two children.

References[edit]

  1. ^ [http:// www.un.org/News/Press/docs//2014/sga1501.doc.htm "Secretary-General Appoints Oscar Fernandez-Taranco of Argentina as Assistant Secretary-General for Peacebuilding Support"]. Press release. United Nations. 2 September 2014. 
  2. ^ SECRETARY-GENERAL APPOINTS OSCAR FERNANDEZ-TARANCO OF ARGENTINA AS ASSISTANT SECRETARY-GENERAL FOR POLITICAL AFFAIRS United Nations
  3. ^ Interpeace "Governing Council" Retrieved on 7 February 2012

See also[edit]