Osip Dymov (writer)

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Osip Dymov was the pseudonym for Yosif (Osip) Isidorovich Perelman (1878–1959), a Russian writer.[1] His brother was popular-science writer Yakov Perelman.[2]

Dymov was born in Białystok, then in the Russian Empire.[3] His father came from Germany, and died when Yosif was quite young. Yosif attended a Russian gymnasium, and went on to study at the Imperial Forestry Institute in St. Petersburg,[3] graduating in 1902.

At the age of 16 he began to publish humorous stories in Russian satiric journals.[3] At that time he took the pen name 'Osip Dymov', from the character in Anton Chekhov's short story "The Grasshopper" (1892),[4] and continued to write under that name throughout his career.[1]

He emigrated to the United States in 1913,[3] at the invitation of Yiddish actor and theatre director Boris Thomashefsky,[2] and subsequently became known for his contributions to Yiddish theatre.[1] Among his most popular plays are Yoshke Musikant (Yoshke the musician; 1914) and Bronx Express (1919).[2] The latter play had its premiere in 1919 in a Yiddish translation, at the Jewish Art theatre of Jacob Ben-Ami; it was later translated into English and performed at the Astor Theatre on Broadway, in 1922,[5] to mixed reviews.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Sandrow, Nahma (1976). Vagabond Stars: A World History of Yiddish Theater. New York: Limelight Editions. p. 193.
  2. ^ a b c Schedrin, Vassili (1 March 2011). "Dymov, Osip". YIVO Encyclopedia of Jews in Eastern Europe. Retrieved 2017-04-28.
  3. ^ a b c d "Ossip Dymov." Encyclopaedia Judaica. 2nd ed. Detroit: Macmillan Reference USA, 2007. Retrieved via Biography in Context database, 2017-04-25.
  4. ^ Stalter-Pace, S. (2013). Underground Movements: Modern Culture on the New York City Subway. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press. ISBN 9781625340559. p. 116-117.
  5. ^ The Bronx Express at the Internet Broadway Database. Retrieved 2017-04-01.
  6. ^ Stalter-Pace (2013), p. 112.

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