Ostrogski coat of arms

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Baklay
Baklay Coat of Arms
Battle cry: -
Details
Alternative names Ostrogski I Książe, Ostrogski II, Baklay
Earliest mention unknown
Towns none
Families Ostrogski, Szpil, Szpilewski, Szpilowski, Zasławski

Ostrogski (Latin: Baca - Perl, Latin: Laius - white (without chatoyancy) is a Polish coat of arms of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth. A variant of the Leliwa and Ogończyk coat of arms.[1]

History and Description[edit]

Traditional Ostrogski coat of arms was described in his work Kasper Niesiecki, while its iconographic representation is seen on the Ostroh Bible. According to Niesiecki the first (oldest) Ostrogski coat of arms was Pogon Ruska coat of arms where the Saint George pierces a dragon (see Saint George and the Dragon). During the Battle of Vedrosha on July 14, 1500 the Grand Hetman of Lithuania Konstanty Ostrogski was taken a prisoner by the Muscovite forces and later sent to Vologda. Nikolay Karamzin sites that on October 18, 1506 Ostrogski pledged his allegiance to the Grand Prince of Moscow Vasili III as a boyar, confirmed by the Metropolitan of Moscow Simon.[2] Ostrogski was sent then to the Sloboda Ukraine to fight Tatars, but managed to escape and returned to Lithuania in 1507.

After Konstanty Ostrogski returned from the Muscovite captivity he adopted a new coat of arms (his former coat of arms was to similar to that of the Grand Duchy of Moscow). The new coat of arms was created as a mix of Leliwa and Ogończyk coat of arms, in remembrance of his two sons Eliasz (whose wife Beata Kościelecka was of Ogończyk Coat of Arms) and Konstanty (whose wife Zofia Tarnowska was of Leliwa Coat of Arms).[3]

According to the Libro del Conoscimiento (Book of the Knowledge) the coat of arms for country of Roxia (Ruthenia) was described as a green field with an octagonal star, while its banner consists of two golden half-moons at a silver field pointing with their horns at each other. To the similarity of the description points Roman Klymkevych[4][5]

Notable bearers[edit]

Notable bearers of this coat of arms include:

Gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jan Nepomucen Bobrowicz: Kasper Niesiecki: Herbarz polski Kaspra Niesieckiego S.J.. T. 7. Lipsk: Nakładem i drukiem Breitkopfa i Haertela, 1841, s. 175,176.
  2. ^ Karamzin, N. "History of the Russian State". Vol.7.Ch.1.
  3. ^ Jan Nepomucen Bobrowicz: Kasper Niesiecki: Herbarz polski Kaspra Niesieckiego S.J.. T. 7. Lipsk: Nakładem i drukiem Breitkopfa i Haertela, 1841, s. 175,176.
  4. ^ Biography of Klymkevych at the Institute of History of Ukraine of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine
  5. ^ Klymkevych R. "Львів і Україна в найдавнішому геральдичному творі" (Lviv and Ukraine in the most ancient heraldic work). "Khronika-2000". Kyiv, 2000.

External links[edit]