Otto Schulz

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Otto Schulz
Otto Schulz (1911–1942).jpg
Otto Schulz
Nickname(s) Eins-Zwei-Drei Schulz
Born (1911-02-11)11 February 1911
Treptow an der Rega (Now in Poland)
Died 17 June 1942(1942-06-17) (aged 31)
Sidi Rezegh
Allegiance  Nazi Germany
Service/branch Balkenkreuz (Iron Cross) Luftwaffe
Years of service 1934–1942
Rank Oberleutnant
Unit Jagdgeschwader 27
Battles/wars

World War II

Awards Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross

Otto Schulz (born 11 February 1911 in Treptow an der Rega – died 17 June 1942 in Sidi Rezegh) was a Oberleutnant and Luftwaffe fighter ace in World War II. He scored 48 of his victories against the Western Allies and three victories over the Eastern Front in over 450 combat missions whilst flying the Messerschmitt Bf 109. [Also, as distinct from Otto Schultz, another German fighter ace in World War II who flew with JG 51 over the Eastern Front]

Luftwaffe service[edit]

Otto Schulz joined the Luftwaffe in 1934 and served as an instructor until January 1940, when he was posted to the newly formed 4./Jagdgeschwader 27 (JG 27—27th Fighter Wing). He participated in the French Campaign and the Battle of Britain, scoring his first victory on 31 August 1940. By the end of 1940, he had four victories to his credit. Schulz also participated in the brief Balkan Campaign in April 1941, scoring two victories, flying out of airbases in Bulgaria then Greece.[1] His unit, as with most of the Luftwaffe, was then withdrawn for the imminent invasion of Russia. Despite II./JG 27's very brief 9-day participation in Operation Barbarossa,[2] he scored three victories. Two of these were some of the 25 bombers shot down over Vilnius by II./JG 27 on 25 June,[2] however most of that short time the Gruppe was tasked with fighter-bomber missions.

The Gruppe was then withdrawn back to Germany to re-equip on the new Messerschmitt Bf 109F fighter, before being sent to join I./JG 27 already based in North Africa late in September.[2] Once there, Otto became far more successful. On 6 October 1941, 20 October and 28 November, he recorded three victories on each day. Otto's score-sheet is slightly unusual in that many of his victories can be positively identified with specific Allied pilots: On 30 November, his 23rd and 24th victims were aces Sergeant Alan Cameron (6.5 victories) and Pilot Officer Neville Duke (27th v.). He claimed another 'ace' on 15 December (30th v.), when he shot down and killed Pilot Officer Geoffrey Ranger (5 victories) of No. 250 Squadron RAF.

On 25 January 1942, in claiming two P-40 fighters for his 34th and 35th victories, he overtook his Staffelkapitän (squadron leader) Gustav Rödel as the top scorer in II./JG 27. On 15 February 1942, he took off on his own and chased after 20 aircraft of Nos 94 and 112 Sqns that had just strafed his airfield at Martuba.[3] He shot down five more P-40 Kittyhawks in ten minutes, including the top 17-victory Royal Air Force (RAF) ace Ernest "Imshi" Mason.[4][5] This put him on 44 victories, just behind the 48 of the then top-scorer in the Desert, Hans-Joachim Marseille. In recognition of this success, they were both awarded the Knight's Cross on the same day - 22 February - the first such awards for JG 27 since arriving in North Africa.

After this his scoring slowed down to only three victories in March. Sent to officer-training school,[5] he was promoted to Leutnant in April. At the end of May, now an Oberleutnant and assigned to the Stab (HQ) flight of II./JG 27 as Technical Officer,[3] he had another quick flurry of four victories including his 50th on 31 May: a P-40 flown by South African ace Major Andrew Duncan (5.5 victories) of No. 5 Squadron SAAF, who was killed.

On 17 June 1942, after claiming his 51st and last victory (Canadian ace Flight Lieutenant Walter "Wally" Conrad (6.5 victories) of No. 274 Squadron who was wounded), Schulz himself was shot down and killed in his Bf 109 F-4trop (Werknummer 10 271—factory number) by RAF Kittyhawks near Sidi Rezegh.[3][4] Research suggests the victory should be credited to Canadian ace James "Stocky" Edwards of No. 260 Squadron RAF.

Summary of career[edit]

Aerial victory claims[edit]

Schulz is credited with 51 victories from about 400 combat missions, and included only 3 victories on the Eastern Front.

  This and the ♠ (Ace of spades) indicates those aerial victories which made Schulz an "ace-in-a-day", a term which designates a fighter pilot who has shot down five or more airplanes in a single day.

Chronicle of aerial victories
Victory Date Time Type Location Unit Victory Date Time Type Location Unit
– Claims with II. Gruppe of Jagdgeschwader 27 –[6]
On the Channel Front — August – November 1940
1 31 August 1940 13:40 Spitfire Dover 4./JG 77 3 3 September 1940 11:35 Spitfire Thames Estuary 4./JG 77
2 1 September 1940 15:15 Spitfire Ashford 4./JG 77 4 28 October 1940 15:30 Spitfire Gravesend 4./JG 77
– Claims with II. Gruppe of Jagdgeschwader 27 –[6]
During the Balkan Campaign — April 1940
5 15 April 1941 06:55 PZL P.24 west Trikkala 4./JG 77 6 20 April 1941 17:10 Hurricane Megara 4./JG 77
– Claims with II. Gruppe of Jagdgeschwader 27 –[7]
On the Eastern Front — June 1941
7 22 June 1941 08:20 I-15 north Alytus 4./JG 77 9 26 June 1941 14:40 SB-3 east Paratjanowo 4./JG 77
8 26 June 1941 09:25 SB-3 north-northwest Vilnius 4./JG 77
– Claims with II. Gruppe of Jagdgeschwader 27 –[8]
In North Africa — April 1941 – June 1942
10 6 October 1941 09:10 P-40 southeast Sidi Omar 4./JG 77 31 20 December 1941 09:40 P-40 west Maraua 4./JG 77
11 6 October 1941 09:15 Hurricane southeast Sidi Omar 4./JG 77 32 20 December 1941 09:43 P-40 west Maraua 4./JG 77
12 6 October 1941 09:20 Hurricane southeast Sidi Omar 4./JG 77 33 11 January 1942 13:10 P-40 Antelat 4./JG 77
13 30 October 1941 09:30 Hurricane south Bardia 4./JG 77 34 25 January 1942 16:35 P-40 northeast Antelat 4./JG 77
14 30 October 1941 09:35 Hurricane west-southwest Bardia 4./JG 77 35 25 January 1942 16:40 P-40 northeast Antelat 4./JG 77
15 30 October 1941 09:43 Hurricane 25 km (16 mi) southwest Sollum 4./JG 77 36 8 February 1942 10:35 P-40 Ain el Gazala 4./JG 77
16 17 November 1941 07:10 Bombay northeast Ain el Gazala 4./JG 77 37 8 February 1942 10:40 P-40 east Ain el Gazala 4./JG 77
17 21 November 1941 09:55 Wellington southwest El Adem 4./JG 77 38 13 February 1942 10:22 P-40 northeast Tobruk 4./JG 77
18 22 November 1941 16:55 P-40 20 km (12 mi) southeast Bir Hacheim 4./JG 77 39 13 February 1942 10:30 P-40 Tobruk 4./JG 77
19 25 November 1941 16:00 P-40 north Tobruk 4./JG 77 40♠ 15 February 1942 17:45 P-40 southeast Martuba 4./JG 77
20 28 November 1941 16:00 P-40 north El Adem 4./JG 77 41♠ 15 February 1942 17:46 P-40 southeast Martuba 4./JG 77
21 28 November 1941 16:10 Hurricane southwest El Adem 4./JG 77 42♠ 15 February 1942 17:47 P-40 southeast Martuba 4./JG 77
22 28 November 1941 16:12 Hurricane El Adem 4./JG 77 43♠ 15 February 1942 17:50 P-40 west Ain el Gazala 4./JG 77
23 30 November 1941 09:10 P-40 northeast Bir el Gubi 4./JG 77 44♠ 15 February 1942 17:55 P-40 southeast Martuba 4./JG 77
24 30 November 1941 09:20 P-40 southwest El Adem 4./JG 77 45 13 March 1942 12:35 P-40 southwest Tobruk 4./JG 77
25 4 December 1941 10:16 P-40 Bir el Gubi 4./JG 77 46 15 March 1942 11:32 P-40 Kittyhawk 10 km (6.2 mi) south Fort Acroma 4./JG 77
26 6 December 1941 12:28 Blenheim southeast El Adem 4./JG 77 47 28 May 1942 12:20 P-40 Kittyhawk 15 km (9.3 mi) northwest El Adem 4./JG 77
27 6 December 1941 12:30 Blenheim southeast El Adem 4./JG 77 48 28 May 1942 16:12 P-40 Tomahawk 15 km (9.3 mi) east El Adem 4./JG 77
28 7 December 1941 09:50 Boston south Ain el Gazala 4./JG 77 49 31 May 1942 18:57 P-40 20 km (12 mi) southwest El Adem 4./JG 77
29 8 December 1941 13:10 Boston north Ridotto 4./JG 77 50 31 May 1942 19:00 P-40 15 km (9.3 mi) southwest El Adem 4./JG 77
30 15 December 1941 11:30 P-40 southwest Geziregh 4./JG 77 51 17 June 1942 10:20 Hurricane east Bu Amud 4./JG 77

Awards[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ According to Obermaier on 30 December 1941.[10]

References[edit]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ Weal 2003, p. 42.
  2. ^ a b c Weal 2003, p. 49.
  3. ^ a b c Weal 2003, p. 78.
  4. ^ a b Sundin & Bergström 1997, p. 34.
  5. ^ a b Scutts 1994, p. 20.
  6. ^ a b Prien, Rodeike & Stemmer 1997, p. 553.
  7. ^ Prien, Rodeike & Stemmer 1997, p. 554.
  8. ^ Prien, Rodeike & Stemmer 1997, pp. 554–557.
  9. ^ Patzwall 2008, p. 189.
  10. ^ Obermaier 1989, p. 202.
  11. ^ Patzwall & Scherzer 2001, p. 430.
  12. ^ Fellgiebel 2000, p. 393.
  13. ^ Scherzer 2007, p. 691.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Fellgiebel, Walther-Peer (2000) [1986]. Die Träger des Ritterkreuzes des Eisernen Kreuzes 1939–1945 — Die Inhaber der höchsten Auszeichnung des Zweiten Weltkrieges aller Wehrmachtteile [The Bearers of the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross 1939–1945 — The Owners of the Highest Award of the Second World War of all Wehrmacht Branches] (in German). Friedberg, Germany: Podzun-Pallas. ISBN 978-3-7909-0284-6. 
  • Obermaier, Ernst (1989). Die Ritterkreuzträger der Luftwaffe Jagdflieger 1939 – 1945 [The Knight's Cross Bearers of the Luftwaffe Fighter Force 1939 – 1945] (in German). Mainz, Germany: Verlag Dieter Hoffmann. ISBN 978-3-87341-065-7. 
  • Patzwall, Klaus D.; Scherzer, Veit (2001). Das Deutsche Kreuz 1941 – 1945 Geschichte und Inhaber Band II [The German Cross 1941 – 1945 History and Recipients Volume 2] (in German). Norderstedt, Germany: Verlag Klaus D. Patzwall. ISBN 978-3-931533-45-8. 
  • Patzwall, Klaus D. (2008). Der Ehrenpokal für besondere Leistung im Luftkrieg [The Honor Goblet for Outstanding Achievement in the Air War] (in German). Norderstedt, Germany: Verlag Klaus D. Patzwall. ISBN 978-3-931533-08-3. 
  • Prien, Jochen; Rodeike, Peter; Stemmer, Gerhard (1997). Messerschmidt Bf 109 im Einsatz bei II./Jagdgeschwader 27, 1940 – 1945 [Messerschmidt Bf 109 in Action with I./Jagdgeschwader 27, 1940 – 1945] (in German). Eutin, Germany: Struve-Druck. ISBN 978-3-923457-42-7. 
  • Scherzer, Veit (2007). Die Ritterkreuzträger 1939–1945 Die Inhaber des Ritterkreuzes des Eisernen Kreuzes 1939 von Heer, Luftwaffe, Kriegsmarine, Waffen-SS, Volkssturm sowie mit Deutschland verbündeter Streitkräfte nach den Unterlagen des Bundesarchives [The Knight's Cross Bearers 1939–1945 The Holders of the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross 1939 by Army, Air Force, Navy, Waffen-SS, Volkssturm and Allied Forces with Germany According to the Documents of the Federal Archives] (in German). Jena, Germany: Scherzers Militaer-Verlag. ISBN 978-3-938845-17-2. 
  • Scutts, Jerry (1994). Bf 109 Aces of North Africa and the Mediterranean. London, UK: Osprey Publishing. ISBN 978-1-85532-448-0. 
  • Sundin, Claes; Bergström, Christer (1997). Luftwaffe Fighter Aircraft in Profile. Altglen, PA: Schiffer Military History. ISBN 978-0-7643-0291-6. 
  • Weal, John (2003). Jagdgeschwader 27 'Afrika'. London, UK: Osprey Publishing. ISBN 978-1-84176-538-9. 

Further reading[edit]

  • Ring, Hans & Girbig, Werner. Die Dokumentation über den Einsatz and allen Fronten 1939-1945 Stuttgart: Motorbuch Verlag (1994). ISBN 3-87943-215-5 for extensive unit history & data
  • Shores, Christopher & Ring, Hans. Fighters over the Desert London: Neville Spearman (1969). ISBN 0-854350-60-8
  • Shores, Christopher & Massimello, Giovanni. A History of the Mediterranean Air War 1940-1945 Vol 1 London: Grub Street Publishing (2012). ISBN 978-1908117076 has day-by-day combat analysis
  • Shores, Christopher & Massimello, Giovanni. A History of the Mediterranean Air War 1940-1945 Vol 2 London: Grub Street Publishing (2014). ISBN 978-1909166127 has day-by-day combat analysis
  • Smith, J.Richard & Pegg, Martin. Jagdwaffe Vol 3, Sec3: War over the Desert June1940 - June1942 Hersham, Surrey: Ian Allan Publishing, 2003 ISBN 1-903223-22-9
  • Weal, John. Bf109D/E Aces 1939-41. Oxford: Osprey Publishing, 1996. ISBN 1-85532-487-3.