Jasmin Singer

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Jasmin Singer signing books in 2016

Jasmin Singer (born October 30, 1979) is an American animal rights activist, writer, speaker and actress. She is the co-founder of the non-profit organization Our Hen House and has been the senior editor of VegNews since 2016. She also supports LGBTQ+ and overlapping social justice issues.[1][2]

Singer has appeared on The Dr. Oz Show,[3] Vegucated, The Ghosts in Our Machine,[4] HuffPost Live, and Unchained with Jane Velez-Mitchell.[5] On May 20, 2017, she gave the TED talk "Compassion Unlocks Identity" in Asbury Park, New Jersey.[6][7] In 2014, Singer was named one of the "40 People Under 40 to Teach Us About Each Other" by the magazine The Advocate.[8]

Biography[edit]

Jasmin Singer was born on October 30, 1979.[9] She grew up in Edison, New Jersey.[10] From childhood to adulthood, Singer struggled with weight problems.[11] She studied at Pace University in New York, where she earned an acting degree.[12] At age nineteen, she became vegetarian.[6] After graduating, Singer toured with the AIDS-awareness theater company NItestar as an educator.[13][12] Later, she obtained a master's degree in experiential health and healing from The Graduate Institute and a holistic health certification from the Institute for Integrative Nutrition.[14]

At twenty-four years old, Singer turned to veganism after watching a film about factory farming.[11] Learning about dairy and egg production led her to incorporate animal rights into her LGBTQ+ and feminist activism.[15][13] Immediately after going vegan, Singer volunteered at PETA's headquarters in Norfolk, Virginia for a week, and began steering her career toward animal rights activism.[16][17] Shortly afterward, she started writing articles on the subject and became the campaign manager for Farm Sanctuary.[13] Singer was a freelance writer for VegNews magazine for ten years and since 2016, she has been its senior editor.[18]

Writing[edit]

Singer has written for VegNews, Huffington Post and mindbodygreen.[2][3] She has proposed the use of personal narrative to affect social change, believing that the "animal rights movement has barely even begun to scratch that surface", unlike other social justice movements.[2][19] Her articles on VegNews have focused on "fierce women".[2]

Always Too Much and Never Enough[edit]

On February 2, 2016, Jasmin Singer released her memoir Always Too Much and Never Enough through Penguin Random House.[20] It tells her struggles with disordered eating, society's mistreatment of overweight people and how she lost almost 100 pounds after starting to look after herself. It also touches on her experiences of having a difficult childhood, being bullied while growing up, animal rights and her sexuality.[1][21] The book was conceived after she was approached by publishers following an article she wrote for MindBodyGreen which reached over 100,000 shares in a day.[22][20]

Amy Wilson, reviewing for Everyday eBook, described Always Too Much and Never Enough as a "finely constructed book" and a "fresh and breezy take on memoir", which "manages the delicate feat of sharing her personal journey with an activist's verve that never tips over into the preachy."[23] Merryn Johns at Curve called it "an honest, beautifully written account of her journey".[22] Nathan Runkle opined that "Her witty, yet deeply insightful and educated commentary is not only refreshing, but also provocative."[24] In May 2019, Always Too Much and Never Enough was included among "The 7 Most Inspiring Books About Weight Loss" by Everyday Health.[21]

Our Hen House[edit]

In January 2010, Singer and Mariann Sullivan, an animal law professor at Columbia Law School, co-founded the non-profit organization Our Hen House, which produces multimedia content aimed at helping people to create change for animals.[25][26][27] The Our Hen House website includes interviews, podcasts, reviews, food advice and networking tips, which are divided into categories such as law, academia and arts.[13] Its best known medium is the Our Hen House podcast, co-hosted by Singer and Sullivan, with prominent guests such as Ethan Brown, Carol J. Adams and Damien Mander.[28][29] The organization relies on grants, donations and consultant fees from clients, including the Mayor's Alliance for New York City's Animals and the Eastern Shore Sanctuary in Vermont.[13]

Our Hen House also provides the Animal Law podcast, hosted by Mariann Sullivan.[28][30]

The Our Hen House podcast has been recognized as a Webby Awards' official honoree in 2013,[31] 2015[32] and 2017.[citation needed] In 2015, GO magazine chose Our Hen House as one of the most important ecopreneurships of the year.[33]

In July 2017, the cosmetics company Lush granted $16,000 to the organization for its work against animal cruelty.[28]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Cooper, Mariah (February 4, 2016). "Activist/author here for book signing". Washington Blade. Archived from the original on April 15, 2016. Retrieved November 1, 2019.
  2. ^ a b c d Nemiroff, Brianne (May 3, 2018). "Interview with Jasmin Singer: Vegan Activist, Author, and Badass Woman". Viva Glam Magazine. pp. 1–2. Retrieved November 2, 2019.
  3. ^ a b Hemmelgarn, Seth (February 4, 2016). "Through Always Too Much, lesbian author hopes to help others". Bay Area Reporter. Vol. 46 no. 5 (published February 9, 2016). Archived from the original on February 10, 2016. Retrieved November 1, 2019.
  4. ^ Dent, Ellen (January 8, 2019). "VoiceAmerica with Vegan Powerhouse Jasmin Singer". Jane Unchained (video). Retrieved November 1, 2019.
  5. ^ "It All Started With Juice: My Journey to Health and Peace". Reboot with Joe. Archived from the original on February 29, 2016. Retrieved November 1, 2019.
  6. ^ a b Lai, Jane (May 11, 2017). "Jasmin Singer: Compassion Unlocks Identity". Asbury Park, New Jersey: TED. Archived from the original on June 5, 2017. Retrieved November 1, 2019.
  7. ^ Biese, Alex (May 15, 2017). "Jim McGreevey to give TEDxAsburyPark talk on identity". Asbury Park Press. Archived from the original on November 2, 2019. Retrieved November 1, 2019.
  8. ^ "40 People Under 40 to Teach Us About Each Other". The Advocate. p. 14. Archived from the original on October 27, 2018. Retrieved November 1, 2019.
  9. ^ Singer, Jasmin (October 30, 2019). "Happy 40th Birthday…To Me!". Ourhenhouse.org. Retrieved November 19, 2019.
  10. ^ Rowe, Amy (March 4, 2016). "'Always Too Much and Never Enough': How a New Yorker found her authentic self through veganism and juicing". New York Daily News. Archived from the original on March 6, 2016. Retrieved September 16, 2019.
  11. ^ a b Laurence, Emily (February 3, 2016). "How a junk food vegan fought food addiction and won". Metro New York. Archived from the original on February 3, 2016. Retrieved November 1, 2019.
  12. ^ a b "THE COMPANY". Luigijannuzzi.com. Archived from the original on February 27, 2019. Retrieved November 4, 2019.
  13. ^ a b c d e Greenfield, Beth (September 27, 2010). "Lesbian vegans, but no clich". Time Out. Retrieved September 16, 2019.
  14. ^ Hartglass, Caryn (January 31, 2016). "Jasmin Singer, Always Too Much and Never Enough". Responsible Eating and Living. Archived from the original on February 22, 2016. Retrieved November 19, 2019.
  15. ^ Wehrle, Renee (April 14, 2018). "Always Too Much and Never Enough: An Interview with Activist Jasmin Singer". Global Voices. International House of Chicago. Retrieved November 3, 2019.
  16. ^ Lynch & Hill 2018, 52:05-52:30.
  17. ^ Williams 2016, 32:50-32:58.
  18. ^ Alfano, Elysabeth (August 22, 2018). "Author and Senior Editor of Veg News, Jasmin Singer on Happiness and Compassion. Are they attainable?". WGN (audio and video). 1:17. Retrieved November 19, 2019.
  19. ^ Lynch & Hill 2018, 35:41.
  20. ^ a b Wallis, Louise. "Interview with Jasmin Singer: on life writing and authenticity". Louisewallis.net. Archived from the original on March 18, 2016. Retrieved November 1, 2019.
  21. ^ a b Lawler, Moira (May 21, 2019). "The 7 Most Inspiring Books About Weight Loss". Everyday Health. Retrieved November 2, 2019.
  22. ^ a b Johns, Merryn (March 15, 2016). "Weighty Issues: Always Too Much and Never Enough". Curve. Archived from the original on March 18, 2016. Retrieved November 1, 2019.
  23. ^ Wilson, Amy (March 11, 2016). "Just Enough in Always Too Much and Never Enough by Jasmin Singer". Everyday eBook. Random House. Archived from the original on March 31, 2016. Retrieved November 1, 2019.
  24. ^ "JASMIN SINGER: ALWAYS TOO MUCH AND NEVER ENOUGH" (PDF). FILM GUIDE. The Loft Cinema. March 2016. p. 13. Retrieved November 1, 2019.
  25. ^ Parker, Scott (June 17, 2016). "The Bozeman Reader: Coming perpetually of age". Bozeman Daily Chronicle. Archived from the original on June 26, 2016. Retrieved November 1, 2019.
  26. ^ Burch, Cathalena E. (February 10, 2016). "Restaurant news". Arizona Daily Star. Archived from the original on February 15, 2016. Retrieved November 1, 2019.
  27. ^ "Spotlight: Our Hen House". VeganConsultant.com. March 9, 2011. Retrieved November 18, 2019.
  28. ^ a b c Starostinetskaya, Anna (July 9, 2017). "LUSH Cosmetics Awards $16k to Vegan Podcast". VegNews. Retrieved November 2, 2019.
  29. ^ "Burger King to offer vegan Impossible Whopper — but how healthy is it?". Yahoo Sports. Retrieved September 30, 2019.
  30. ^ Linch & Hill 2018, 01:00:21-01:00:40.
  31. ^ Nguyen, Melissa (April 14, 2013). "Our Hen House Podcast Recognized by Webby Awards". VegNews. Retrieved November 2, 2019.
  32. ^ "Our Hen House". Webby Award. Archived from the original on October 9, 2015. Retrieved November 2, 2019.
  33. ^ Hymowech, Gena (September 23, 2015). "Eco-preneurs 2015". GO. p. 3. Archived from the original on October 3, 2015. Retrieved November 1, 2019.

Works cited[edit]

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