Outeniqua Transport Museum

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Coordinates: 33°57′48″S 22°28′28″E / 33.9632°S 22.4744°E / -33.9632; 22.4744

Entrance of the Outeniqua Transport Museum

The Outeniqua Transport Museum is a railway museum located in George, South Africa.[1]

Outeniqua Transport Museum[edit]

The museum holds 21 steam locomotives, amongst other vehicles. Its collection includes Paul Kruger's coach and private saloons and the coach that Princess Elizabeth slept in during King George VI and the Royal Family’s 1947 visit to South Africa.[1][2]

Inventory[edit]

Steam locomotives[edit]

Locomotives preserved at the museum are the following, as at 3 May 2017:

  • Dock Shunter 0-4-0ST Stormberg, built by Hudswell, Clarke and Company in 1903 for the Public Works Department of the Cape of Good Hope.[3]
  • 14 Tonner 0-4-0T no. 1, built by Maschinenfabrik Esslingen in 1889 for the Netherlands-South African Railway Company.[4]
  • Class A 4-8-2T no. 103, built by Dübs and Company in 1889 for the Natal Government Railways.[5]
  • Class B 0-6-4T no. 41, built as NZASM no. 197 Kracht by Maschinenfabrik Esslingen in 1897 for the Netherlands-South African Railway Company.[6] (Incorrectly named Roos and President Kruger)
  • Class G 4-8-2T no. 221, built by North British Locomotive Company in 1904 for the Natal Government Railways.[7]
  • Class H2 4-8-2T no. 330, built by Dübs and Company in 1903 for the Natal Government Railways.[5]
  • Class 6J 4-6-0 no. 645, built by Neilson, Reid and Company in 1902 for the Cape Government Railways.[5]
  • Class 7A 4-8-0 no. 1007, built by Neilson and Company in 1896 for the Cape Government Railways.[8]
  • Class 7A 4-8-0 no. 1009, built by Neilson and Company in 1896 for the Cape Government Railways.[8] (Plinthed outside)
  • Class 7BS 4-8-0 no. 1056, built by Neilson, Reid and Company in 1900 for the Imperial Military Railways.
  • Class 16B 4-6-2 no. 805, built by North British Locomotive Company in 1917 for the South African Railways.
  • Class 19C 4-8-2 no. 2439, built by North British Locomotive Company in 1935 for the South African Railways.
  • Class 24 2-8-4 no. 3668, built by North British Locomotive Company in 1949 for the South African Railways.
  • Class S2 0-8-0 no. 3706, built by Friedrich Krupp AG in 1952 for the South African Railways.
  • Class GB 2-6-2+2-6-2 no. 2166, built by Beyer, Peacock and Company in 1921 for the South African Railways.
  • Class GEA 4-8-2+2-8-4 no. 4023 Peacock, built by Beyer, Peacock and Company in 1945 for the South African Railways.
  • Class GF 4-6-2+2-6-4 no. 2401, built by Hanomag in 1927 for the South African Railways.
  • Class GL 4-8-2+2-8-4 no. 2351 Princess Alice, built by Beyer, Peacock and Company in 1930 for the South African Railways.
  • Class GMAM 4-8-2+2-8-4 no. 4070, built by Henschel and Son in 1953 for the South African Railways.
  • Class GO 4-8-2+2-8-4 no. 2575, built by Henschel and Son in 1953 for the South African Railways.
  • Class NG15 2-8-2 no. NG122, built by Société Franco-Belge in 1949 for the Otavi Mining and Railway Company.

Diesel-electric locomotives[edit]

  • Class 32-000 no. 32-029, built by General Electric in 1959 for the South African Railways.[9] (Not on display)
  • Class 32-000 no. 32-042, built by General Electric in 1959 for the South African Railways.[9] (Not on display)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "The Outeniqua Choo-tjoe". Onlinesources.co.za. Retrieved 2009-08-19. 
  2. ^ "Outeniqua Transport Museum". Fodors.com. 2014-11-14. Retrieved 2015-10-05. 
  3. ^ Holland, D. F. (1972). Steam Locomotives of the South African Railways. 2: 1910-1955 (1st ed.). Newton Abbott, Devon: David & Charles. pp. 130–131. ISBN 978-0-7153-5427-8. 
  4. ^ Espitalier, T.J.; Day, W.A.J. (1944). The Locomotive in South Africa - A Brief History of Railway Development. Chapter IV - The N.Z.A.S.M.. South African Railways and Harbours Magazine, October 1944. pp. 761-764.
  5. ^ a b c Holland, D.F. (1971). Steam Locomotives of the South African Railways. 1: 1859–1910 (1st ed.). Newton Abbott, Devon: David & Charles. pp. 49–50, 56, 90–95, 123–124. ISBN 978-0-7153-5382-0. 
  6. ^ Espitalier, T.J.; Day, W.A.J. (1944). The Locomotive in South Africa - A Brief History of Railway Development. Chapter IV - The N.Z.A.S.M. (Continued). South African Railways and Harbours Magazine, November 1944. pp. 844-845, 848.
  7. ^ Espitalier, T.J.; Day, W.A.J. (1944). The Locomotive in South Africa - A Brief History of Railway Development. Chapter III - Natal Government Railways (Continued). South African Railways and Harbours Magazine, July 1944. pp. 503-504.
  8. ^ a b Pattison, R.G. (1997). The Cape Seventh Class Locomotives (1st ed.). Kenilworth, Cape Town: The Railway History Group. pp. 7–10, 22–24, 38–39, 48–50. ISBN 0958400946. 
  9. ^ a b Paxton, Leith; Bourne, David (1985). Locomotives of the South African Railways (1st ed.). Cape Town: Struik. pp. 138–139. ISBN 0869772112.