Outer Coastal Plain AVA

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Outer Coastal Plain AVA
Wine region
Type American Viticultural Area
Year established 2007[1]
Country United States
Part of New Jersey
Climate region Humid subtropical/continental
Total area 2,250,000 acres (911,000 ha)[2]
No. of wineries 28

The Outer Coastal Plain AVA is an American Viticultural Area located in southeastern New Jersey. The 2,250,000 acres (911,000 ha) wine appellation includes all of Cumberland, Cape May, Atlantic, and Ocean counties and portions of Salem, Gloucester, Camden, Burlington, and Monmouth counties. The region is characterized by well-drained sandy or sandy loam soils of low to moderate fertility, and a relatively long growing season. The climate is moderated by the influence of the Atlantic Ocean and Delaware Bay.[2] The region is in hardiness zones 6b, 7a, and 7b. Many wineries located in southern New Jersey within this AVA are members of the Outer Coastal Plain Vineyard Association.

Boundary[edit]

The Federal Register describes the Outer Coastal Plain AVA as being an area "roughly triangular in shape and comprises the most easterly and southerly portions of New Jersey, including most of the State's Atlantic coastline and the area known as the Pine Barrens.[3] It was drawn by the following boundaries:

The Outer Coastal Plain viticultural area includes all of Cumberland, Cape May, Atlantic, and Ocean Counties and portions of Salem, Gloucester, Camden, Burlington, and Monmouth Counties in the State of New Jersey. The boundary of the Outer Coastal Plain

viticultural area is as described below. (1) The beginning point is on the Wilmington map at the confluence of Alloway Creek with the Delaware River (within Mad Horse Creek State Wildlife Management Area) in Salem County; (2) From the beginning point, proceed northeasterly in a straight line to the village of Hagerville; then (3) Continue north on an unnamed road locally known as County Road (CR) 658 to its intersection with State Route (SR) 49; then (4) Proceed northwesterly on SR 49 to its intersection with SR 45 in the center of the town of Salem; then (5) Proceed northeasterly on SR 45 to its intersection with SR 540 at the village of Pointers; then (6) Proceed north on SR 540 into the village of Slapes Corner; then (7) In Slapes Corner, proceed northeasterly on an unnamed road locally known as CR 646 to its intersection with the New Jersey Turnpike near the village of Auburn; then (8) Proceed northeasterly on the New Jersey Turnpike for approximately 18 miles to its intersection with SR 47; then (9) Proceed south on SR 47 for approximately 0.5 mile to its intersection with SR 534 at the village of Gardenville Center; then (10) Proceed southeasterly through Gardenville Center on SR 534 to its intersection with SR 544; then (11) Proceed northeasterly on SR 544 to its intersection with SR 73 on the Hammonton map; then (12) Proceed north-northwesterly on SR 73 to its intersection with SR 70 in Cropwell; then (13) Proceed east on SR 70 to its intersection with U.S. 206 in Red Lion; then (14) Proceed north on U.S. 206, onto the Trenton map, to the village of Chambers Corner; then (15) Proceed northeasterly on an unnamed road locally known as CR 537, through the village of Jobstown; then (16) Continue northeasterly on CR 537, through the villages of Smithburg and Freehold, to its intersection with SR 18; then (17) Proceed easterly on SR 18 to its intersection with the Garden State Parkway; then (18) Proceed north on the Garden State Parkway and immediately exit onto SR 36 East and onto the Long Branch map; then (19) Using the Long Branch map, continue east on SR 36 to where it intersects with Joline Avenue; then (20) Proceed northeasterly on Joline Avenue to the Atlantic Ocean shoreline; then (21) Follow the Atlantic Ocean shoreline south, encompassing all coastal islands, onto the Trenton, Hammonton, Atlantic City, and Cape May maps, to the city of Cape May; then

(22) Proceed west, then north, along the eastern bank of the Delaware River, onto the Atlantic City, Dover, and Wilmington maps to the beginning point.[1]

Wineries[edit]

As of 2014, there are 28 wineries in the Outer Coastal Plain AVA.[4] Most of the wineries in this AVA are also members of the Outer Coastal Plain Vineyard Association, an industry trade organization "dedicated to the establishment and promotion of sustainable and economically viable viticulture in the Outer Coastal Plain AVA of New Jersey."[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b 27 CFR 9.207 Outer Coastal Plain.
  2. ^ a b Appellation America (2007). "Outer Coastal Plain (AVA): Appellation Description". Retrieved Feb. 5, 2008.
  3. ^ Federal Register Volume 71, Number 127 for Monday, July 3, 2006. (Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, 2006), page 37871.
  4. ^ Jackson, Bart. Garden State Wineries Guide. (South San Francisco, CA: Wine Appreciation Guild, 2011). ISBN 9781934259573.
  5. ^ Outer Coastal Plain Vineyard Association. OCPVA Mission Statement. Retrieved 5 April 2013.

External links[edit]