Over Worton

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Over Worton
OverWorton HTrinity SE.jpg
Holy Trinity parish church
Over Worton is located in Oxfordshire
Over Worton
Over Worton
Over Worton shown within Oxfordshire
OS grid reference SP4329
Civil parish
  • Worton
District
Shire county
Region
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town Chipping Norton
Postcode district OX7
Dialling code 01608
Police Thames Valley
Fire Oxfordshire
Ambulance South Central
EU Parliament South East England
UK Parliament
List of places
UK
England
Oxfordshire
51°57′32″N 1°22′34″W / 51.959°N 1.376°W / 51.959; -1.376Coordinates: 51°57′32″N 1°22′34″W / 51.959°N 1.376°W / 51.959; -1.376

Over Worton is a hamlet in Oxfordshire, about 7 miles (11 km) south of Banbury and 7 12 miles (12 km) east of Chipping Norton. Over Worton was a separate civil parish until 1932, when it was merged with Nether Worton to form the current civil parish of Worton.[1]

Archaeology[edit]

Just north of Holy Trinity parish churchyard is an Anglo-Saxon hlaew (barrow), about 59 feet (18 m) in diameter and 6 feet 7 inches (2 m) high.[2] It is a Scheduled Ancient Monument.[3]

Worton has the remains of a medieval village cross. In the 20th century it was restored as the parish war memorial.[4]

Manor[edit]

The Domesday Book records that until 1066 one Leofgeat held the manor of Ortune, probably at what is now Nether Worton. After the Norman Conquest of England an estate of three hides and half a yardland at Worton passed to William the Conqueror's half-brother Odo of Bayeux.[5] By 1086 there were 15 households consisting of 10 smallholders and five villagers.[6]

Parish church[edit]

The chancel of Holy Trinity parish church. The east wall is filled by an arcade of seven stepped lancets, the middle three of which have windows.

Over Worton has had a parish church since at least the 13th century. The earliest known record of it is from 1254.[1] It had a Norman font, which is now in St John's church, Hempton.[7]

In the 1820s Over Worton's curate was the evangelical priest Walter Mayers, who in the 1800s had taught classics at Great Ealing School in what was then Middlesex. His pupils had included John Henry Newman, who then went up to Oxford University. In 1824 Newman was ordained as a Church of England deacon at Christ Church Cathedral, Oxford. It was at Over Worton in 1824 that Newman preached his first sermon, and thereafter served on several occasions.[1]

In the 1840s the curate was William Wilson, an evangelical whose family had owned the manor of Over Worton since 1799. In the 1840s Wilson had the medieval church demolished and the present Church of England parish church of the Holy Trinity built in its place.[1] It is a Gothic revival building, designed by the architect JM Derick and completed in 1844.[8] The north tower was added in 1849 and has two bells.[1]

In the churchyard east of the chancel is a pair of stone medieval coffin lids[9] that may be a remnant from the previous church. Other remnants are a memorial tablet and effigy inside the present church. The tablet is in memory of the lawyer Edmund Meese, who died in 1617. The effigy is of a late 16th- or early 17th-century lawyer, and may also represent Edmund Meese.[1]

Until 2015 Holy Trinity was part of a single benefice with St James' church, Nether Worton.[10] In March 2015 Nether Worton and Over Worton parishes became part of the Benefice of Westcote Barton with Steeple Barton, Duns Tew and Sandford St. Martin and Over with Nether Worton,[11] also called the Dorn and Ridge Benefice.[12]

References[edit]

Over Worton cross. The base is medieval; the shaft and top are 20th-century.
  1. ^ a b c d e f Crossley 1983, pp. 293–300.
  2. ^ Historic England. "Anglo-Saxon burial mound immediately north of Over Worton church graveyard (1009414)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 8 November 2015.
  3. ^ Harden 1954, p. 143.
  4. ^ Historic England. "Village cross  (Grade II) (1194242)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 8 November 2015.
  5. ^ Crossley 1983, pp. 285–293.
  6. ^ Palmer, JJN. "Place: [Nether and Over] Worton". Open Domesday. Retrieved 8 November 2015.
  7. ^ Historic England. "Chapel of Ease of St John the Evangelist  (Grade II) (1046341)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 8 November 2015.
  8. ^ Historic England. "Church of the Holy Trinity  (Grade II) (1368238)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 8 November 2015.
  9. ^ Historic England. "Pair of coffin covers approximately 5 metres south east of chancel of Church of the Holy Trinity  (Grade II) (1194250)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 8 November 2015.
  10. ^ Archbishops' Council. "Nether Worton: St James, Nether Worton". A Church Near You. Church of England. Retrieved 8 November 2014.
  11. ^ Archbishops' Council. "Benefice of Westcote Barton with Steeple Barton, Duns Tew and Sandford Saint Martin and Over with Nether Worton". A Church Near You. Church of England. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 8 November 2015.
  12. ^ The Dorn & Ridge Benefice ~ Oxfordshire, UK

Sources[edit]

External links[edit]