Ovomucoid

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Ovomucoid
1r0r.png
The third Kazal domain of the turkey ovomucoid protein (orange) bound to subtilisin Carlsberg, a serine protease.[1]
Identifiers
Organism Meleagris gallopavo
Symbol ?
UniProt P68390
Ovomucoid
Identifiers
Organism Gallus gallus
Symbol ?
UniProt P01005

Ovomucoid is a protein found in egg whites. It is a trypsin inhibitor with three protein domains of the Kazal domain family.[2][3] The homologs from chickens (Gallus gallus) and especially turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) are best characterized. It is not the same as ovomucin, another egg white protein. Chicken ovomucoid, also known as Gal d 1, is a known allergen. It is the protein most often causing egg allergy. At least four IgE epitopes have been identified.[4] Three other egg white proteins are also identified as allergenic: ovalbumin (Gal d 2), ovotransferrin (Gal d 3) and lysozyme (Gal d 4).[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Horn JR, Ramaswamy S, Murphy KP (August 2003). "Structure and energetics of protein-protein interactions: the role of conformational heterogeneity in OMTKY3 binding to serine proteases". Journal of Molecular Biology. 331 (2): 497–508. doi:10.1016/S0022-2836(03)00783-6. PMID 12888355.
  2. ^ Lineweaver H, Murray CW (December 1947). "Identification of the trypsin inhibitor of egg white with ovomucoid". The Journal of Biological Chemistry. 171 (2): 565–81. PMID 20272096.
  3. ^ Rimphanitchayakit V, Tassanakajon A (April 2010). "Structure and function of invertebrate Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors". Developmental and Comparative Immunology. 34 (4): 377–86. doi:10.1016/j.dci.2009.12.004. PMID 19995574.
  4. ^ Järvinen KM, Beyer K, Vila L, Bardina L, Mishoe M, Sampson HA (July 2007). "Specificity of IgE antibodies to sequential epitopes of hen's egg ovomucoid as a marker for persistence of egg allergy". Allergy. 62 (7): 758–65. doi:10.1111/j.1398-9995.2007.01332.x. PMID 17573723.
  5. ^ Caubet JC, Wang J (2011). "Current understanding of egg allergy". Pediatr. Clin. North Am. 58 (2): 427–43, xi. doi:10.1016/j.pcl.2011.02.014. PMC 3069662. PMID 21453811.