Oxacillin

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Oxacillin
Oxacillin skeletal.svg
Clinical data
Trade names Bactocill
AHFS/Drugs.com Monograph
MedlinePlus a685020
ATC code
Identifiers
CAS Number
PubChem CID
DrugBank
ChemSpider
UNII
KEGG
ChEBI
ChEMBL
ECHA InfoCard 100.000.577
Chemical and physical data
Formula C19H19N3O5S
Molar mass 401.436 g/mol
3D model (Jmol)
Density 1.49 g/cm3
Boiling point 686.8 °C (1,268.2 °F)
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Oxacillin sodium (trade name Bactocill) is a narrow-spectrum beta-lactam antibiotic of the penicillin class developed by Beecham.[1]

Uses[edit]

Oxacillin is a penicillinase-resistant β-lactam. It is similar to methicillin, and has replaced methicillin in clinical use. Other related compounds are nafcillin, cloxacillin, dicloxacillin, and flucloxacillin. Since it is resistant to penicillinase enzymes, such as that produced by Staphylococcus aureus, it is widely used clinically in the US to treat penicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. However, with the introduction and widespread use of both oxacillin and methicillin, antibiotic-resistant strains called methicillin-resistant and oxacillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA/ORSA) have become increasingly prevalent worldwide. MRSA/ORSA is treated using vancomycin.

Adverse effects[edit]

Further information: Penicillin drug reaction

Side effects include hypersensitivity and local reactions. In high doses, renal, hepatic, or nervous system effects can occur.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ David Greenwood (2008). Antimicrobial drugs: chronicle of a twentieth century medical triumph. Oxford University Press US. pp. 124–. ISBN 978-0-19-953484-5. Retrieved 18 November 2010. 
  2. ^ Drugs.com: Bactocill