Oxydoras niger

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Ripsaw catfish
DSCN6772 (6260750690).jpg
Oxydoras niger
Not evaluated (IUCN 3.1)
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii
Order: Siluriformes
Family: Doradidae
Genus: Oxydoras
Species: O. niger
Binomial name
Oxydoras niger
(Valenciennes, 1821)

The ripsaw catfish (Oxydoras niger) or cuiu cuiu is a species of thorny catfish native to the Amazon, Essequibo and São Francisco basins in Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Peru and Venezuela. This species grows to a length of 100 centimetres (39 in) SL and weights up to 13 kilograms (29 lb). This species is a minor component of local commercial fisheries.[1] Has lateral thorns that can damage a potential predator or handler. It feeds by shifting through sand and detecting eatable parts with the taste receptors in the roof and floor of its mouth.

Ecology[edit]

O. niger occurs over mud in streams and lakes. It is known from temperatures ranging from 24–29.8°C (75–85.6°F), pH range of 5–9, and an alkalinity range of 42–142. It is known to form schools. This species feeds on detritus, chironomid and ephemeropteran larvae, and crustaceans.[1]

In the aquarium[edit]

O. niger is a popular aquarium fish species. In the hobby, it goes by many names, including black talking catfish, razorback catfish, mother of snails catfish, ripsaw catfish, and black doradid.[2] This species grows to a large size and are often bought by unsuspecting aquarists when small. They will rapidly outgrow smaller tanks, so the aquarium should be as large as possible.[2][3] O. niger is especially light shy and should be provided with sheltered areas to hide.[3] Although these fish are peaceful, very small tankmates are still at risk of being eaten.[2] This species readily accepts prepared foods.[2] O. niger has not been bred under aquarium conditions.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Froese, Rainer and Pauly, Daniel, eds. (2011). "Oxydoras niger" in FishBase. December 2011 version.
  2. ^ a b c d e "PlanetCatfish::Catfish of the Month::February 2001". PlanetCatfish.com. 2006-04-12. Retrieved 2007-06-16. 
  3. ^ a b Axelrod, Herbert R.; Emmens, C.; Burgess, W.; Pronek, N. (1996). Exotic Tropical Fishes. T.F.H. Publications. ISBN 0-87666-543-1.