Oyashio-class submarine

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Japanese Submarine Oyashio SS590.JPEG
Oyashio at Pearl Harbor in 2006
Class overview
Name: Oyashio (おやしお, Oyashio Current)
Builders:
Operators:  Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force
Preceded by: Harushio class
Succeeded by: Sōryū class
Built: 1994–2008
In commission: 1998–
Planned: 11
Completed: 11
Active: 9 (2 converted to training ships)
General characteristics
Type: Attack submarine
Displacement:
Length: 81.7 m (268 ftin)
Beam: 8.9 m (29 ftin)
Draught: 7.4 m (24 ftin)
Propulsion:
  • Diesel-electric
  • 2 Kawasaki 12V25S diesel engines
  • 2 Kawasaki alternators
  • 2 Toshiba motors
  • 3,400 hp (2,500 kW) surfaced
  • 7,750 hp (5,780 kW) submerged
Speed:
  • 12 knots (22 km/h; 14 mph) (surfaced)
  • 20 knots (37 km/h; 23 mph) (submerged)
Complement: 70 (10 officers)
Sensors and
processing systems:
  • Sonar: Hughes/Oki ZQQ-6 hull-mounted sonar, flank arrays, 1 towed array
  • Radar: JRC ZPS 6 I-band search radar.
Armament:

The Oyashio class is a series of Japanese diesel-electric attack submarines operated by the JMSDF. The submarines entered service in the late 1990s. The submarines are larger than the earlier Harushio class, to provide space for a flank sonar array.

Boats[edit]

There are a total of 11 boats in the class - the last boat was commissioned in 2008. Oyashio, Michishio, and Kuroshio share their names with World War II destroyers Takashio shares a name with a third set of Yūgumo-class destroyers, of which none were built.

The first two boats, Oyashio and Michishio, have since been converted to training platforms.

On February 1, 2018, The Ministry of Defence’s Maritime Staff Office, revealed that seven of the service’s 82 m Oyashio-class submarines, which have a surface displacement of 2,800 tonnes – have already completed service-life extension work to date. The seven boats have received extensive refits during their second and third maintenance cycles, which have been planned to bring the vessels to “almost the same level of that of the latest model Sōryū-class submarine, while extending their service lives.[1]


Project no. Building no. Pennant no. Name Laid down Launched Commissioned Shipyard  Note
S130 8105 SS-590/
TSS-3608
Oyashio (おやしお) 26 January 1994 15 October 1996 16 March 1998 Kawasaki Shipbuilding Corporation, Kobe[2] Converted to training submarine (TSS-3608) on 6 March 2015
8106 SS-591 Michishio (みちしお) 16 February 1995 18 September 1997 10 March 1999 Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Kobe Converted to training submarine (TSS-3609) on 27 February 2017
8107 SS-592 Uzushio (うずしお) 6 March 1996 26 November 1998 9 March 2000 Kawasaki Shipbuilding Corporation, Kobe
8108 SS-593 Makishio (まきしお) 26 March 1997 22 September 1999 29 March 2001 Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Kobe
8109 SS-594 Isoshio (いそしお) 9 March 1998 27 November 2000 14 March 2002 Kawasaki Shipbuilding Corporation, Kobe
8110 SS-595 Narushio (なるしお) 2 April 1999 4 October 2001 3 March 2003 Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Kobe
8111 SS-596 Kuroshio (くろしお) 27 March 2000 23 October 2002 8 March 2004 Kawasaki Shipbuilding Corporation, Kobe
8112 SS-597 Takashio (たかしお) 30 January 2001 1 October 2003 9 March 2005 Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Kobe
8113 SS-598 Yaeshio (やえしお) 15 January 2002 4 November 2004 9 March 2006 Kawasaki Shipbuilding Corporation, Kobe
8114 SS-599 Setoshio (せとしお) 23 January 2003 5 October 2005 28 February 2007 Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Kobe
8115 SS-600 Mochishio (もちしお) 23 February 2004 6 November 2006 6 March 2008 Kawasaki Shipbuilding Corporation, Kobe

Pictures[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Japan outlines submarine modernisation efforts". February 1, 2018.
  2. ^ Saunders, Stephen (2004). Jane's Fighting Ships 2004-2005. Jane's Information Group. p. 384. ISBN 0-7106-2623-1.

External links[edit]