P. Djèlí Clark

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P. Djèlí Clark
BornDexter Gabriel
1971 (age 50–51)
Queens, New York, U.S.
Pen namePhenderson Djèlí Clark
OccupationWriter, historian
NationalityAmerican
Period2011–present
GenreFantasy, science fiction
Notable worksRing Shout (2020)
Website
pdjeliclark.com

Dexter Gabriel (born 1971), also known as Phenderson Djèlí Clark or P. Djèlí Clark, is an American speculative fiction writer and historian. His historical fantasy Ring Shout won the British Fantasy, Locus and Nebula Awards in 2021. He publishes his fiction and academic work under separate names, with his African sobriquet "Djèlí" making reference to the griots, traditional Western African storytellers, historians and poets. He has also published under the name A. Phenderson Clark.

Life and career[edit]

Dexter Gabriel was born in New York City in 1971, but spent most of his early years living in his parents' original home of Trinidad and Tobago.[1][2] At age eight, he returned to the US and lived in Staten Island and Brooklyn before moving to Houston, Texas, when he was 12.[3][1] Gabriel went to college at Texas State University-San Marcos, earning a B.A. and then an M.A. in history. He then earned a doctorate in history from Stony Brook University. Gabriel is currently Assistant Professor in the Department of History at the University of Connecticut.[4]

In 2011, Gabriel began publishing short stories variously as P. Djèlí Clark, Djèlí A. Clark, Phenderson Djèlí Clark, and A. Phenderson Clark.[2] Phenderson was his grandfather's name, while Clark was his mother's maiden name; Djèlí refers to West African storytellers, known in French as griots.[1][5] He chose to use a nom de plume in order to separate his academic and literary work. In 2016, Clark sold his first major work, a short story titled "A Dead Djinn in Cairo," to Tor.com.[1] Since then, he has published novellas, short stories, and a novel.

Literary recognition[edit]

Novellas[edit]

Year[a] Work Award Result Ref.
2018 The Black God's Drums Hugo Award Nominated [6]
Locus Award Nominated [7]
Nebula Award Nominated [7]
World Fantasy Award Nominated [7]
2019 The Haunting of Tram Car 015 Hugo Award Nominated [8]
Locus Award Nominated [7]
Mythopoeic Fantasy Award Nominated [7]
Nebula Award Nominated [9]
2020 Ring Shout British Fantasy Award Won [7]
Hugo Award Nominated [10]
Locus Award Won [7]
Nebula Award Won [11]
Shirley Jackson Award Nominated [7]
World Fantasy Award Nominated [7]

Short stories[edit]

Year[a] Work Award Result Ref.
2018 "The Secret Lives of the Nine
Negro Teeth of George Washington
"
Hugo Award Nominated [12]
Locus Award Won [13]
Nebula Award Won [14]
Theodore Sturgeon Award Nominated [15]

Bibliography[edit]

Novels[edit]

  • A Master of Djinn. Tor, 2021.

Novellas[edit]

Shorter works[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Year of publication

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Phenderson Djèlí Clark: Wonderful Things to Behold". Locus Magazine. October 28, 2019. Retrieved November 2, 2019.
  2. ^ a b Clute, John; Langford, David; et al. (eds.). "Clark, Phenderson Djèlí". The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction (3rd ed.). Gollancz. Retrieved September 14, 2021.
  3. ^ Maxwell, Daryl (October 2, 2018). "Interview With an Author: P. Djèlí Clark". Los Angeles Public Library. Retrieved November 2, 2019.
  4. ^ "Dexter Gabriel | Department of History". University of Connecticut (in American English). August 15, 2016. Retrieved March 31, 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  5. ^ Fortier, Ron. "Griots: A Sword and Soul Anthology". New York Journal of Books. Retrieved September 14, 2021.
  6. ^ Morgan, Cheryl (April 2, 2019). "2019 Hugo Award & 1944 Retro Hugo Award Finalists". The Hugo Awards. World Science Fiction Society. Retrieved April 11, 2020.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i "P. Djèlí Clark Awards". Science Fiction Awards Database. Locus Science Fiction Foundation. Retrieved September 13, 2021.
  8. ^ "Announcing the 2020 Hugo Award Finalists". Tor.com. Macmillan. April 7, 2020. Retrieved April 11, 2020.
  9. ^ "2019 Nebula Awards". The Nebula Awards. Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. Retrieved April 11, 2020.
  10. ^ "2021 Hugo Awards". The Hugo Awards. World Science Fiction Society. Retrieved September 14, 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  11. ^ "SFWA Announces 56th Annual Nebula Award Winners". The Nebula Awards. Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. June 5, 2021. Retrieved June 6, 2021.
  12. ^ "2019 Hugo Award & 1944 Retro Hugo Award Finalists". The Hugo Awards. World Science Fiction Society. April 2, 2019. Retrieved November 2, 2019.
  13. ^ "2019 Locus Awards Winners". Locus Magazine (in American English). June 29, 2019. Retrieved November 2, 2019.
  14. ^ "2018 Nebula Awards". The Nebula Awards (in American English). Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. Retrieved November 2, 2019.
  15. ^ "Sturgeon Award Finalists Announced". Locus Magazine. March 5, 2019. Retrieved November 2, 2019.

External links[edit]