P. F. Volland Company

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P. F. Volland Company
StatusDefunct
Founded1908
FounderPaul Frederick Volland
SuccessorShaw Barton Company
Country of originUnited States
Headquarters locationChicago, Illinois
Publication typesbooks, greeting cards, music, calendars, games

P. F. Volland Company of Chicago, Illinois published poetry books, greeting cards,[1] music, children's books, calendars, cookbooks, and children's occupational games,[1] between 1908[2] and 1959. The press was noted for using new printing processes, including off-set printing techniques,[2] and color illustrations. The P. F. Volland Company is also known for the many significant artists and writers whose work it published.

Founder[edit]

The company was founded by Paul Frederick Volland.[3] He was shot and killed by Vera Trepagnier in a business dispute on May 5, 1919 in the Volland offices.[4][5][6]

Volland Ideal[edit]

The Volland Ideal was used to market P. F. Volland's lines of children's books. The Volland Ideal was "that books should make children happy and build character unconsciously and should contain nothing to cause fright, suggest fear, glorify mischief, excuse malice or condone cruelty."[7][8]

History[edit]

Christmas cards were added as a product line in 1909.[9]

After 1912, the firm had offices in the Monroe Building (across the street from the Art Institute), which were designed by the well-known architect Walter Burley Griffin.[10] Griffin also had offices in the Monroe Building[11] and his wife, architect Marion Mahony Griffin, provided illustrations for some of P. F. Volland's greeting cards.[12][13]

In 1916, the firm moved to a new space in the Garland Building, 58 East Washington Street, Chicago, Illinois.[14][15]

In 1917, the company was incorporated in Delaware.[16]

In 1919, the firm participated in the Victory Loan drive organized by the Liberty Loan Committee for the Publishing, Printing, Advertising, and Allied Interests.[17]

Frederick J. Clampitt, who had been a silent partner and an executive member of the firm since 1916, became president of P. F. Volland after Paul Volland’s death in 1919.[2][18] Other officers of the company in 1919 were W. R. Anderson, vice president; H. S. Adams, secretary; Edwin J. Clampitt, assistant treasurer; James R. Offield, member of board of directors; Maurice Berkson, member of board of directors. J. P. McEvoy headed up the editorial department.[18]

The New York representative of the firm was Francis H. Evans.[19] In 1929, the New York representative of the firm was Harry A. Moore.[20]

The P. F. Volland Company merged with the Gerlach Barlow Company in 1924[21] and moved some of its offices to the Gerlach Barlow Building in Joliet, Illinois.[3] The Volland brand name continued to be used for Volland products.[2] The Volland offices at 58 E. Washington in Chicago, Illinois were retained and sold both the Volland and Gerlach Barlow lines.[2]

After World War II, Volland produced greeting cards for the emerging African American market.[22]

By 1935, the book titles published by Volland were acquired by other publishers, including Wise Book Company and M.A. Donahue.[2][6]

The Shaw Barton Company, a competitor of the Gerlach Barlow Company, purchased the company in 1959[3] and closed down the Joliet operation.[21]

An example of framed poetry from the PF Volland Co., dated 1916.

Authors and illustrators of the P.F. Volland Co.[edit]

Volland hired many significant early 20th century artists and writers.[2] Many worked as freelancers.[23]

Book series published by P.F. Volland[edit]

  • Classics series
  • Friendship series
  • Golden Youth series
  • Good Cheer series
  • Happy Children series
  • Hug Me Toy Books
  • Jolly Jingle series
  • Jolly Kid series
  • Punky Dunk
  • Philadelphia Ledger Newspaper Books
  • Read Me A Story series
  • Sunny Book series
  • Volland "Fairy Children" series
  • Volland Inglenook series

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b The American Stationer and Office Outfitter, Volume 90, page 8.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g "P.F. Volland Company Records".
  3. ^ a b c Smith, Timothy J; Smith, Michelle Y (2009). Joliet's Gerlach Barklow Calendar Company. Charleston, SC: Arcadia Publishing. p. 61. ISBN 9780738577265.
  4. ^ Shank, Barry (2004). A Token of My Affection: Greeting Cards and American Business Culture. New York: Columbia University Press. pp. 145–146. ISBN 0231118783.
  5. ^ The American Stationer, Volume 84, May 10, 1919, p. 14.
  6. ^ a b Dzwonkoski, Peter (1986). American Literary Publishing Houses, 1900-1980: Trade and Paperback. Detroit, MI: Gale Research Company. p. 371. ISBN 0810317249.
  7. ^ Wynne, Annette. Treasure Things. New York: P.F. Volland Co, 1922, advertisement at rear of title. OCLC 18523682
  8. ^ Dzwonkoski, Peter (1986). American Literary Publishing Houses 1900-1980: Trade and Paperback. Detroit, MI: Gale Research Company. p. 370. ISBN 0810317249.
  9. ^ Shank, Barry (2004). A Token of My Affection: Greeting Cards and American Business Culture. New York: Columbia University Press. p. 134. ISBN 0231118783.
  10. ^ Cahan, Richard; Williams, Michael (2014). The Monroe Building: a Chicago Masterpiece Rediscovered. Chicago. p. 76. ISBN 0692258965.
  11. ^ Cahan, Richard; Williams, Michael (2014). The Monroe Building: a Chicago Masterpiece Rediscovered. Chicago. pp. 14, 66. ISBN 0692258965.
  12. ^ Griffin, Marion Mahony. Pedestal for Flower Basket, Plan of Basket. Eric Milton Nicholls Collection. 1912.OCLC 225001896
  13. ^ Griffin, Marion Mahony. Workman with Pottery. Eric Milton Nicholls Collection. 1912. OCLC 225001999
  14. ^ The American Stationer, Volume 79, June 10, 1916, p. 5-6.
  15. ^ Emporis GmbH. "Garland Building".
  16. ^ "P. F. Volland Art Publisher, Shot in Office". The American Stationer and Office Outfitter. 84: 14. Retrieved 13 February 2019.
  17. ^ Publishers' Weekly, May 3, 1919, p. 1219.
  18. ^ a b Publishers' Weekly, June 14, 1919, p. 1637.
  19. ^ The Bookseller, Newsdealer and Stationer, New York: Excelsior Pub. House, Volume 52, (June 1, 1920),p. 610.
  20. ^ "[Directory]". Publishers' Weekly. 115: 523. 1929. Retrieved 27 November 2018.
  21. ^ a b Smith, Timothy J; Smith, Michelle Y (2009). Joliet's Gerlach Barklow Calendar Company. Charleston, SC: Arcadia Publishing. p. 8. ISBN 9780738577265.
  22. ^ Shank, Barry (2004). A Token of My Affection: Greeting Cards and American Business Culture. New York: Columbia University Press. p. 196. ISBN 0231118783.
  23. ^ Shank, p.145.

Bibliography[edit]