Portal:Comics

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from P:COMICS)
Jump to: navigation, search
Comics portal logo.svg

Introduction

Shortcuts:

Comics denotes a hybrid medium having verbal side of its vocabulary tightly tied to its visual side in order to convey narrative or information only, the latter in case of non-fiction comics, seeking synergy by using both visual (non-verbal) and verbal side in interaction. Although some comics are picture-only, pantomime strips, such as The Little King, the verbal side usually expand upon the pictures, but sometimes act in counterpoint.

The term derives from the mostly humorous early work in the medium, and came to apply to that form of the medium including those far from comic. The sequential nature of the pictures, and the predominance of pictures over words, distinguishes comics from picture books, although some in comics studies disagree and claim that in fact what differentiates comics from other forms on the continuum from word-only narratives, on one hand, to picture-only narratives, on the other, is social context.

Comics as a real mass medium started to emerge in the United States in the early 20th century with the newspaper comic strip, where its form began to be standardized (image-driven, speech balloons, etc.), first in Sunday strips and later in daily strips. The combination of words and pictures proved popular and quickly spread throughout the world.

More about comics...

Selected article

Lance Henriksen reprised his role as Bishop from the films 'Aliens' and 'Alien 3'

Alien vs. Predator is a science fiction film released in 2004 by 20th Century Fox. It is an adaptation of a crossover franchise between the titular extraterrestrials from the Alien and Predator series, a concept which originated in a 1989 comic book. Set in 2004, Alien vs. Predator follows a group of paleontologists, archaeologists, and others assembled by billionaire Charles Bishop Weyland (Lance Henriksen) for an expedition near the Antarctic after discovering a mysterious heat signal. Hoping to claim the find for himself, Weyland and the group discover a pyramid below the surface of a whaling station. Hieroglyphics and sculptures reveal that the pyramid is a hunting ground for Predators who kill Aliens as a rite of passage. The humans are caught in the middle of a battle between the two species and attempt to prevent the Aliens from reaching the surface. Released in North America on August 13, 2004, Alien vs. Predator received mostly negative reviews from film critics. Some praised the special effects and set designs, while others dismissed the film for its "wooden dialogue" and "cardboard characters". Nevertheless, Alien vs. Predator became the most commercially successful film in the franchises, grossing a total of $172 million. The film's success led to a sequel in 2007 titled Aliens vs. Predator: Requiem.

Selected picture

A play with panels in Winsor McCay's Little Sammy Sneeze strip.
Credit: Winsor McCay

A panel is an individual frame, or single drawing, in the multiple-panel sequence of a comic strip or comic book. A panel consists of a single drawing depicting a frozen moment. Newspaper daily strips typically consist of either four panels (Doonesbury, For Better or For Worse) or three panels (Garfield, Dilbert), all of the same size. The horizontal newspaper strip can also employ only a single panel, as sometimes seen in Wiley Miller's Non Sequitur.

Projects

Parent projects
ArtsEntertainmentVisual arts
Main project
Comics
WikiProjects
Sub-projects
BatmanComic stripsG.I. JoeSupermanDC ComicsTransformersWebcomics
Related Projects
AnimationAnime and mangaBiographyFilmFictional charactersMedia franchisesMusicTelevisionVideo games

What are WikiProjects?

Selected biography

Eric Millikin

Eric Millikin, also known as Eric Monster Millikin, is an award-winning American artist and former human anatomy lab embalmer and dissectionist. He is known for his pioneering work in Internet art and webcomics, and for his controversial semi-autobiographical artwork with political, romantic and horror themes. Millikin began posting comics and art on the internet using CompuServe in the 1980s, and began publishing on the World Wide Web as early as the fall of 1995. His artwork has also been published in books, serialized in newspapers, and displayed in art museums. The themes of Millikin's art often involve the occult, romantic relationships, and self-portraits as well as portraits of celebrities and political figures. The artwork is mixed media, often combining expressionist paintings and optical illusions with found objects. Millikin's works often have political themes, and the text is sometimes written in free verse or ambigrams. Millikin is one of the few, and first, webcomic creators successful enough to make a living as an artist. He often collaborates with artist Casey Sorrow.

Did you know...

Did you know?

In the news

Anniversaries for May 27

Categories

Selected quote

[t]he standards of comics include inventiveness, originality, and consistency. The best comics really are great artworks — great by the intrinsic standards of that art form.

Featured content

Featured article star.png

Featured articles

Featured lists

Featured topics


Topics

Comics
Comics topics

Formats: Comic book (minicomic)  · Comic strip (Comic strip formats, Daily strip, Sunday comics, Sunday strip, Topper· Digital comics · Graphic novel · Mobile comic · Motion comics · Trade paperback  · Webcomic (Hypercomics · Infinite canvas · Sprite comic)

Creators: Category:Comics artists · Category:Comics writers · Female comics creators (list)

Studies: History in the U.S.: Golden Age, Silver Age, Bronze Age, Modern Age (Events)  · History in Japan  · Women in comics · LGBT themes in comics

Genres: Adult comics · Alternative comics · Autobiographical comics · Bad girl art · Crime comics · Fantasy comics · Funny animal · Good girl art · Horror comics · Romance comics · Science fiction comics · Superhero comics · Teen humor comics · Underground comix · War comics · Western comics

Tropes: Superhero · Supervillain

By country: Argentina · Australia · Belgium · Brazil · Canada (Quebec· China (Hong Kong)  · Czech Republic · France · Germany · Hungary · India · Italy · Japan · Korea · Mexico · The Netherlands · Philippines · Poland · Spain · Serbia · Thailand · United Kingdom (Wales)  · United States

Things you can do

Things you can do

Subportals

Related portals

Associated Wikimedia