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Platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase 1b, regulatory subunit 1 (45kDa)
Protein PAFAH1B1 PDB 1uuj.png
PDB rendering based on 1uuj.
Available structures
PDB Ortholog search: PDBe, RCSB
External IDs OMIM601545 MGI109520 HomoloGene371 GeneCards: PAFAH1B1 Gene
EC number
RNA expression pattern
PBB GE PAFAH1B1 211547 s at tn.png
More reference expression data
Species Human Mouse
Entrez 5048 18472
Ensembl ENSG00000007168 ENSMUSG00000020745
UniProt P43034 P63005
RefSeq (mRNA) NM_000430 NM_013625
RefSeq (protein) NP_000421 NP_038653
Location (UCSC) Chr 17:
2.59 – 2.69 Mb
Chr 11:
74.67 – 74.72 Mb
PubMed search [1] [2]

Platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase IB subunit alpha is an enzyme that in humans is encoded by the PAFAH1B1 gene.[1][2][3] The protein is often referred to as Lis1 and plays an important role in regulating the motor protein Dynein.[4]


PAFAH1B1 was identified as encoding a gene that when mutated or lost caused the lissencephaly associated with Miller-Dieker syndrome. PAFAH1B1 encodes the non-catalytic alpha subunit of the intracellular Ib isoform of platelet-activating factor acteylhydrolase, a heterotrimeric enzyme that specifically catalyzes the removal of the acetyl group at the SN-2 position of platelet-activating factor (identified as 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glyceryl-3-phosphorylcholine). Two other isoforms of intracellular platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase exist: one composed of multiple subunits, the other, a single subunit. In addition, a single-subunit isoform of this enzyme is found in serum.[3]

According to one study, PAFAH1B1 interacts with VLDLR receptor activated by reelin.[5]


The gene is located at chromosome 17p13.3 on the Watson (plus) strand. The gene is 91,953 bases in length and encodes a protein of 410 amino acids (predicted molecular weight 46.638 kiloDaltons).


PAFAH1B1 has been shown to interact with DYNC1H1,[6] CLIP1,[7] NDEL1,[8][9] NDE1,[10] PAFAH1B3,[11] PAFAH1B2,[11] NUDC,[12] TUBA1A[13] and Doublecortin.[14]

See also[edit]


  1. ^ Reiner O, Carrozzo R, Shen Y, Wehnert M, Faustinella F, Dobyns WB, Caskey CT, Ledbetter DH (Aug 1993). "Isolation of a Miller-Dieker lissencephaly gene containing G protein beta-subunit-like repeats". Nature 364 (6439): 717–21. doi:10.1038/364717a0. PMID 8355785. 
  2. ^ Lo Nigro C, Chong CS, Smith AC, Dobyns WB, Carrozzo R, Ledbetter DH (Feb 1997). "Point mutations and an intragenic deletion in LIS1, the lissencephaly causative gene in isolated lissencephaly sequence and Miller-Dieker syndrome". Human Molecular Genetics 6 (2): 157–64. doi:10.1093/hmg/6.2.157. PMID 9063735. 
  3. ^ a b "Entrez Gene: PAFAH1B1 platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase, isoform Ib, alpha subunit 45kDa". 
  4. ^ Kardon JR, Vale RD (Dec 2009). "Regulators of the cytoplasmic dynein motor". Nature Reviews. Molecular Cell Biology 10 (12): 854–65. doi:10.1038/nrm2804. PMID 19935668. 
  5. ^ Zhang G, Assadi AH, McNeil RS, Beffert U, Wynshaw-Boris A, Herz J, Clark GD, D'Arcangelo G (2007). Mueller U, ed. "The Pafah1b complex interacts with the reelin receptor VLDLR". PloS One 2 (2): e252. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0000252. PMC 1800349. PMID 17330141. 
  6. ^ Tai CY, Dujardin DL, Faulkner NE, Vallee RB (Mar 2002). "Role of dynein, dynactin, and CLIP-170 interactions in LIS1 kinetochore function". The Journal of Cell Biology 156 (6): 959–68. doi:10.1083/jcb.200109046. PMC 2173479. PMID 11889140. 
  7. ^ Coquelle FM, Caspi M, Cordelières FP, Dompierre JP, Dujardin DL, Koifman C, Martin P, Hoogenraad CC, Akhmanova A, Galjart N, De Mey JR, Reiner O (May 2002). "LIS1, CLIP-170's key to the dynein/dynactin pathway". Molecular and Cellular Biology 22 (9): 3089–102. doi:10.1128/MCB.22.9.3089-3102.2002. PMC 133759. PMID 11940666. 
  8. ^ Toyo-oka K, Shionoya A, Gambello MJ, Cardoso C, Leventer R, Ward HL, Ayala R, Tsai LH, Dobyns W, Ledbetter D, Hirotsune S, Wynshaw-Boris A (Jul 2003). "14-3-3epsilon is important for neuronal migration by binding to NUDEL: a molecular explanation for Miller-Dieker syndrome". Nature Genetics 34 (3): 274–85. doi:10.1038/ng1169. PMID 12796778. 
  9. ^ Niethammer M, Smith DS, Ayala R, Peng J, Ko J, Lee MS, Morabito M, Tsai LH (Dec 2000). "NUDEL is a novel Cdk5 substrate that associates with LIS1 and cytoplasmic dynein". Neuron 28 (3): 697–711. doi:10.1016/S0896-6273(00)00147-1. PMID 11163260. 
  10. ^ Efimov VP, Morris NR (Aug 2000). "The LIS1-related NUDF protein of Aspergillus nidulans interacts with the coiled-coil domain of the NUDE/RO11 protein". The Journal of Cell Biology 150 (3): 681–8. doi:10.1083/jcb.150.3.681. PMC 2175200. PMID 10931877. 
  11. ^ a b Sweeney KJ, Clark GD, Prokscha A, Dobyns WB, Eichele G (Apr 2000). "Lissencephaly associated mutations suggest a requirement for the PAFAH1B heterotrimeric complex in brain development". Mechanisms of Development 92 (2): 263–71. doi:10.1016/S0925-4773(00)00242-2. PMID 10727864. 
  12. ^ Morris SM, Albrecht U, Reiner O, Eichele G, Yu-Lee LY (May 1998). "The lissencephaly gene product Lis1, a protein involved in neuronal migration, interacts with a nuclear movement protein, NudC". Current Biology 8 (10): 603–6. doi:10.1016/S0960-9822(98)70232-5. PMID 9601647. 
  13. ^ Sapir T, Elbaum M, Reiner O (Dec 1997). "Reduction of microtubule catastrophe events by LIS1, platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase subunit". The EMBO Journal 16 (23): 6977–84. doi:10.1093/emboj/16.23.6977. PMC 1170301. PMID 9384577. 
  14. ^ Caspi M, Atlas R, Kantor A, Sapir T, Reiner O (Sep 2000). "Interaction between LIS1 and doublecortin, two lissencephaly gene products". Human Molecular Genetics 9 (15): 2205–13. doi:10.1093/oxfordjournals.hmg.a018911. PMID 11001923. 

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