World Grand Prix (darts)

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World Grand Prix
Tournament information
Venue Citywest Hotel
Location Dublin
Country Republic of Ireland
Established 1998
Organisation(s) PDC
Format Sets
"double in, double out"
Prize fund £400,000 (2014)
Month(s) Played October
Current champion(s)
Netherlands Michael van Gerwen

The World Grand Prix is a PDC darts tournament held in Dublin each October. Its original venue was the Casino Rooms in Rochester, Kent in 1998 and 1999, and then for one year only in 2000 at the Crosbie Cedars Hotel in Rosslare, County Wexford. In 2001, the tournament moved further north to the Citywest Hotel in Dublin. In 2009, the tournament moved from the hall at the main Citywest Hotel to the newly completed bigger venue on site, the Citywest Hotel Convention Centre. When the World Grand Prix was founded in 1998, it replaced the earlier World Pairs tournament which ran from 1995 to 1997.

The World Grand Prix was sponsored by bookmakers Paddy Power from 2001 to 2003, before Sky Bet took over in 2004. The subsidiary Sky Poker was the tournament's sponsor in 2008. In 2010, online gambling company Bodog became the event's title sponsor, while PartyPoker.com took over as sponsor in 2011. In 2016, Unibet took over as sponsor.

Although he has dominated the event with eleven title wins, Phil Taylor has been knocked out of the World Grand Prix five times in the first round. In 2001, he lost 2–1 to qualifier Kevin Painter, in 2004 by 2 sets to 0 to Andy Callaby, in 2007 by 2–0 in sets to Adrian Gray, in 2015 by 2–0 in sets to Vincent van der Voort and in 2016 by 2–1 to Steve West.

The current champion is Michael van Gerwen of the Netherlands, who defeated Gary Anderson of Scotland 5–2 in the final on 8 October 2016.

Tournament format[edit]

The tournament is unusual in that it is the only televised event in which players must commence and finish each leg on a double including the bullseye.

There have been several different formats for the tournament. The first event in 1998 event was a straight knock-out tournament played in a setplay format with each set being contested over the best of three legs. The following year this changed to the best of five legs per set. Furthermore, a group stage was introduced in 1999, with there only being four seeded players for the event, all of whom reached the semi-finals. In 2000, the tournament reverted to being a straight knock-out and has remained so ever since.

The double-start format also makes landing a perfect nine-dart finish even more difficult, as it limits the number of combinations and guarantees that a player must either start or finish on the bullseye. The first nine-darter in Grand Prix history was completed by Brendan Dolan in the 2011 semi-final. In 2014, James Wade and Robert Thornton both hit perfect legs in the same match, the first time this happened in any televised event. On all three occasions, the leg started with a score of 160 (starting on double 20), followed by 180, followed by finishing 161 with treble 20, treble 17, and bullseye.

World Grand Prix Finals[edit]

The list of finals:[1]

Year Champion (average in final) Score Runner-Up (average in final) Prize Money Sponsor Venue
Total Champion Runner-Up
1998 England Phil Taylor 13–8 England Rod Harrington £38,000 £9,000 £5,000 PDC Casino Rooms, Rochester, Kent
1999 England Phil Taylor (92.59) 6–1 England Shayne Burgess (81.26)
2000 England Phil Taylor (91.32) 6–1 England Shayne Burgess (81.48) £70,000 £15,000 £7,500 Crosbie Cedars Hotel, Rosslare
2001 England Alan Warriner (83.52) 8–2 Netherlands Roland Scholten (81.84) £78,000 £15,000 £7,500 Paddy Power Citywest Hotel, Dublin
(The Hall in the Main Hotel)
2002 England Phil Taylor (100.17) 7–3 Canada John Part (88.62) £70,000 £14,000 £7,000
2003 England Phil Taylor (94.80) 7–2 Canada John Part (83.25) £76,000 £15,000 £7,500
2004 England Colin Lloyd (85.29) 7–3 England Alan Warriner (77.91) £100,000 £20,000 £10,000 Sky Bet
2005 England Phil Taylor (90.74) 7–1 England Colin Lloyd (82.05) £100,000 £20,000 £10,000
2006 England Phil Taylor (88.24) 7–4 England Terry Jenkins (82.51) £130,000 £25,000 £12,500
2007 England James Wade (86.03) 6–3 England Terry Jenkins (84.58) £200,000 £50,000 £20,000
2008 England Phil Taylor (97.81) 6–2 Netherlands Raymond van Barneveld (90.42) £250,000 £50,000 £25,000 Sky Poker
2009 England Phil Taylor (97.07) 6–3 Netherlands Raymond van Barneveld (86.62) £350,000 £100,000 £40,000 Sky Bet Citywest Hotel, Dublin
(The Convention Centre)
2010 England James Wade (88.92) 6–3 England Adrian Lewis (89.33) Bodog
2011 England Phil Taylor (90.29) 6–3 Northern Ireland Brendan Dolan (84.68) PartyPoker.com
2012 Netherlands Michael van Gerwen (87.53) 6–4 England Mervyn King (81.96)
2013 England Phil Taylor (97.67) 6–0 England Dave Chisnall (81.29)
2014 Netherlands Michael van Gerwen (90.81) 5–3 England James Wade (89.26) £400,000 £100,000 £45,000
2015 Scotland Robert Thornton (90.79) 5–4 Netherlands Michael van Gerwen (96.79)
2016 Netherlands Michael van Gerwen (100.29) 5–2 Scotland Gary Anderson (92.73) Unibet

Finalists[edit]

Player Won Runner-up Finals
England Phil Taylor 11 0 11
Netherlands Michael van Gerwen 3 1 4
England James Wade 2 1 3
England Colin Lloyd 1 1 2
England Alan Warriner 1 1 2
Scotland Robert Thornton 1 0 1
Netherlands Raymond van Barneveld 0 2 2
England Shayne Burgess 0 2 2
England Terry Jenkins 0 2 2
Canada John Part 0 2 2
England Dave Chisnall 0 1 1
Northern Ireland Brendan Dolan 0 1 1
England Rod Harrington 0 1 1
England Mervyn King 0 1 1
England Adrian Lewis 0 1 1
Netherlands Roland Scholten 0 1 1
Scotland Gary Anderson 0 1 1

World Pairs winners[edit]

The World Pairs event which preceded the introduction of this event was held between 1995 and 1997.[2]

Year Winners Score Runners Up Venue
1995 England Eric Bristow
England Dennis Priestley
14–9 (legs) England Keith Deller
Scotland Jamie Harvey
Butlin's Wonder West World, Ayr
1996 England Bob Anderson
England Phil Taylor
18–15 (legs) England Chris Mason
England Steve Raw
Willows Variety Centre, Salford
1997 Netherlands Raymond van Barneveld
Netherlands Roland Scholten
18–15 (legs) Wales Richie Burnett
England Rod Harrington
Butlin's South Coast World, Bognor Regis

Media coverage[edit]

The World Grand Prix has been broadcast in the UK by Sky Sports since the first tournament.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "World Grand Prix". dartsdatabase.co.uk. Retrieved 9 October 2011. 
  2. ^ "PDC World Pairs Winners". dartsdatabase.co.uk. Retrieved 9 October 2011. 

External links[edit]