PEN/ESPN Award for Literary Sports Writing

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The PEN/ESPN Award for Literary Sports Writing is awarded by the PEN American Center to honor "a nonfiction book about sports."[1] The award was established in 2010 and is awarded to a title that is "biographical, investigative, historical, or analytical" in nature.[1][2][3] Judges have included Robert Lipsyte, Tim O'Brien, and Susan Orlean.

Presented in conjunction is the PEN/ESPN Lifetime Achievement Award for Literary Sports Writing. This award is given to an American or U.S. based writer to honor "their body of work and long-term contributions to the field of literary sports writing."[1][4] The award was established in 2011 and includes an honorarium of US$5,000.[5] Candidates are nominated by PEN Members.

The award is one of many PEN awards sponsored by International PEN affiliates in over 145 PEN centers around the world. The PEN American Center awards have been characterized as being among the "major" American literary prizes.[6]

Award winners[edit]

2010
  • Lifetime Achievement Award: no award
  • Literary Sports Writing: Marshall Jon Fisher, A Terrible Splendor
2011
2012
  • Lifetime Achievement Award: Dan Jenkins[10]
  • Literary Sports Writing: Dan Barry, Bottom of the 33rd: Hope, Redemption, and Baseball’s Longest Game
2013 [11]
2014[13]
2015[16][17]
  • Lifetime Achievement Award: Bob Ryan
  • Literary Sports Writing: John Branch, Boy on Ice: The Life and Death of Derek Boogaard

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c PEN American Center Literary Awards
  2. ^ "PEN and ESPN Partner on Sports Writing Award". Publishers Weekly. May 12, 2010. Retrieved August 11, 2012. 
  3. ^ "ESPN And PEN Team Up For Sports Writing Award". Huffington Post. May 11, 2010. Retrieved August 11, 2012. 
  4. ^ "PEN/ESPN Lifetime Achievement Award for Literary Sports Writing Announced". Independent Publisher. Retrieved August 11, 2012. 
  5. ^ Dave Bogart (2011). Library and Book Trade Almanac. Information Today. p. 628. 
  6. ^ Alfred Bendixen (2005). "Literary Prizes and Awards". The Continuum Encyclopedia of American Literature. Continuum International Publishing Group. p. 689. 
  7. ^ "Jacket Copy: PEN American Center's 2011 award winners". LA Times. August 11, 2011. Retrieved August 11, 2012. 
  8. ^ Stacey Mickelbart (August 11, 2011). "The 2011 PEN Honorees in The New Yorker". The New Yorker. Retrieved August 11, 2012. 
  9. ^ Gabe Habash (August 12, 2011). "2011 PEN Literary Awards Winners". Publishers Weekly. Retrieved August 11, 2012. 
  10. ^ "2012 PEN/ESPN Lifetime Achievement Award for Literary Sports Writing". pen.org. Retrieved August 1, 2014. 
  11. ^ Carolyn Kellogg (August 14, 2013). "Jacket Copy: PEN announces winners of its 2013 awards". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved August 14, 2013. 
  12. ^ "2013 PEN/ESPN Lifetime Achievement Award for Literary Sports Writing". pen.org. Retrieved August 1, 2014. 
  13. ^ Ron Charles (July 30, 2014). "Winners of the 2014 PEN Literary Awards". Washington Post. Retrieved August 1, 2014. 
  14. ^ "2014 PEN/ESPN Lifetime Achievement Award for Literary Sports Writing". pen.org. Retrieved August 1, 2014. 
  15. ^ "2014 PEN/ESPN Award for Literary Sports Writing". pen.org. Retrieved August 1, 2014. 
  16. ^ Carolyn Kellogg (May 13, 2015). "PEN announces award-winners and shortlists". LA Times. Retrieved May 14, 2015. 
  17. ^ "2015 PEN Literary Award Winners". pen.org. Retrieved May 14, 2015. 

External links[edit]