PKP class Pt47

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PKP Pt47
Pt 47-152 Chabówka (Nemo5576).jpg
Pt47 locomotive
Type and origin
Power type Steam
Builder Fablok (120) nos. 1–100, 161–180
Cegielski (60) nos. 101–160
Build date 1948–1951
Total produced 180
Specifications
Configuration:
 • Whyte 2-8-2
 • UIC 1′D1′ h2
Gauge 1,435 mm (4 ft 8 12 in) standard gauge
Leading dia. 1,000 mm (39.37 in)
Driver dia. 1,850 mm (72.83 in)
Trailing dia. 1,200 mm (47.24 in)
Length 23.835 m (78 ft 2 in)
Axle load 18.7 tonnes (18.4 long tons; 20.6 short tons)
Adhesive weight 83.2 tonnes (81.9 long tons; 91.7 short tons)
Loco weight 105.5 tonnes (103.8 long tons; 116.3 short tons)
Tender type 27D48
Tender cap. 10.0 tonnes (9.8 long tons; 11.0 short tons)
Firebox:
 • Firegrate area
4.49 m2 (48.3 sq ft)
Boiler pressure 15 kg/cm2 (1.47 MPa; 213 psi)
Heating surface 230.2 m2 (2,478 sq ft)
 • Firebox 19.8 m2 (213 sq ft)
Superheater:
 • Heating area 100.5 m2 (1,082 sq ft)
Cylinders Two, outside
Cylinder size 630 mm × 700 mm (24.80 in × 27.56 in)
Performance figures
Maximum speed 110 km/h (68 mph)
Tractive effort 200 kN (44,960 lbf)
Career
Operators PKP
Class Pt47
Numbers Pt47-1 to Pt47-180
Locale Poland

PKP Class Pt47 is a Polish steam locomotive. Related to the successful PKP class Pt31 class, the main difference is the addition of circular tubes in the fire chamber, thereby significantly increased boiler performance. This class also featured a superheater and many have mechanical stokers to feed coal into the firebox. 180 locomotives were built in total.[1]

Although heavy, the Pt47 is powerful and fast. Its main use was to carry heavy fast trains, especially on long distance routes, for example on the difficult route from Cracow to Krynica.

The Pt47 easily reached speeds of 100 km/h (62 mph), with a heavy train, although is not as refined as the PKP class Pm36 - especially on routes with a lower quality track. A maximum speed of 110 km/h (68 mph) could be achieved even with a train of 600 tonnes (590 long tons; 660 short tons). In the 1950s these machines were could travel 824 km (512 miles) per day.[citation needed]

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