Pac-12 Conference Baseball Coach of the Year

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Pac-12 Conference Baseball Coach of the Year
Awarded forthe most outstanding baseball coach in the Pac-12 Conference
CountryUnited States
First awarded1978
Currently held byBill Kinneberg, Utah

The Pac-12 Conference Coach of the Year is a baseball award given to the Pac-12 Conference's most outstanding coach. From 1978-1998, an award was given to the most outstanding Coach in both the North and South divisions. After the 1999 season, the divisions were eliminated.

Key[edit]

Co-Coaches of the Year
Awarded one of the following National Coach of the Year awards that year:

Collegiate Baseball Coach of the Year (CB)
Baseball America Coach of the Year (BA)

Coach (X) Denotes the number of times the coach had been awarded the Coach of the Year award at that point
*
Elected to the National College Baseball Hall of Fame as a coach but is no longer active
*^
Active coach who has been elected to the National College Baseball Hall of Fame (as a coach)
Conf. W–L Conference win–loss record for that season
Conf./Div. St.T Conference/Division standing at year's end (Tdenotes a tie)
Overall W–L Overall win–loss record for that season
Season Team won the College World Series

Winners[edit]

1999-Present[edit]

Season Coach School National Coach of
the Year Awards
Conf.
W–L
Conf.
St.
Overall
W–L
Reference
1999 Mark Marquess (8) Stanford 19–5 1 50–15 [1]
2000 Pat Murphy Arizona State 17–7 1T 44–15 [1]
2001 David Esquer California 18–6 1 45–19 [1]
2002 Mike Gillespie (4) Southern California 37–24 1 46–14 [1]
2003 Mark Marquess (9) Stanford 18–6 1 51–18 [1]
2004 Gary Adams UCLA 35–29 3 46–14 [1]
2005 Pat Casey (2) Oregon State 19–5 1 46–12 [1]
2006 Pat Casey (3) Oregon State BA, CB 16–7 1 50–16 [1]
2007 Pat Murphy (2) Arizona State 19–5 1 49–15 [1]
2008 Pat Murphy (3) Arizona State 16–8 1 49–13 [1]
2009 Pat Murphy (4) Arizona State 21–6 1 51–14 [1]
2010 Tim Esmay Arizona State 20–7 1 52–10 [1]
2011 Pat Casey (4) Oregon State 17–10 3 41–19 [1]
2012 Andy Lopez Arizona 20–10 1T 48–17 [2]
2013 Pat Casey (5) Oregon State 24–6 1 52–13 [3]
2014 Lindsay Meggs (1) Washington 21–9 2 41–17 [4]
2015 John Savage UCLA 22–8 1 45–16 [5]
2016 Bill Kinneberg Utah 19–11 1 26–29 [6]

North Division (1978-1998)[edit]

Season Coach School National Coach of
the Year Awards
Conf.
W–L
Div.
St.
Overall
W–L
Reference
1978 Chuck Brayton* Washington State 15–3 1 41–17 [1]
1979 Bob MacDonald Washington 11–5 2 37–13 [1]
1980 Chuck Brayton* (2) Washington State 11–3 1 36–10 [1]
1981 Bob MacDonald (2) Washington 12–6 1 34–18 [1]
1982 Jack Riley Oregon State 16–8 1 29–15 [1]
1983 Jack Riley (2) Oregon State 17–7 1 27–15 [1]
1984 Jack Dunn Portland State 15–6 1T 39–17 [1]
1985 Bob MacDonald (3) Washington 15–9 2 36–12 [1]
1986 Jack Riley (3) Oregon State 18–5 1 39–15 [1]
1987 Chuck Brayton* (3) Washington State 18–6 1 44–19 [1]
1988 Chuck Brayton* (4) Washington State 18–4 1 52–14 [1]
1989 Chuck Brayton* (5) Washington State 16–8 1 37–20 [1]
1990 Bob MacDonald (4) Washington 19–05 3 47–19 [1]
1991 Chuck Brayton* (6) Washington State 14–6 1 37–25 [1]
1992 Bob MacDonald (5) Washington 20–10 3 39–21 [1]
1993 Jack Riley (4) Oregon State 20–10 2 32–18 [1]
1994 Steve Hertz Gonzaga 13–17 4 29–23 [1]
1994 Jack Riley (5) Oregon State 22–5 1 35–16 [1]
1995 Steve Farrington Washington State 18–12 1 28–30 [1]
1996 Ken Knutson Washington 16–8 1 30–28 [1]
1997 Pat Casey Oregon State 18–6 2 38–12-1 [1]
1997 Ken Knutson (2) Washington 20–4 1 46–20 [1]
1998 Ken Knutson (3) Washington 17–7 1 41–17 [1]

South Division (1978-1998)[edit]

Season Coach School National Coach of
the Year Awards
Conf.
W–L
Div.
St.
Overall
W–L
Reference
1978 Rod Dedeaux* Southern California 15–3 1 56–10 [1]
1979 Gary Adams UCLA 21–9 1 43–18 [1]
1980 Jerry Kindall* Arizona 17–13 1T 45–21-1 [1]
1980 Bob Milano California 17–13 1T 44–23 [1]
1981 Jim Brock Arizona State 26–4 1 55–13 [1]
1982 Jim Brock (2) Arizona State 23–5 1 58–15 [1]
1983 Mark Marquess Stanford 20–10 1 41–17-1 [1]
1984 Jim Brock (3) Arizona State 23–7 1 55–20 [1]
1985 Mark Marquess (2) Stanford 23–7 1 47–15 [1]
1986 Gary Adams UCLA 18–6 1 44–19 [1]
1987 Mark Marquess (3) Stanford BA 21–9 1 53–17 [1]
1988 Jim Brock (3) Arizona State BA 21–9 1 60–13 [1]
1989 Jerry Kindall (2) Arizona 23–7 1 45–18-1 [1]
1990 Mark Marquess (4) Stanford 24–6 1 59–12 [1]
1991 Mike Gillespie Southern California 23–7 1 46–17-1 [1]
1992 Jerry Kindall* Arizona 18–12 1 34–23-1 [1]
1992 Bob Milano California 14–16 5 35–28 [1]
1993 Jim Brock (4) Arizona State 19–11 1 46–20 [1]
1994 Mark Marquess (5) Stanford 21–9 1 36–24 [1]
1995 Mike Gillespie (2) Southern California 21–9 1 49–21 [1]
1996 Mike Gillespie (3) Southern California 24-6 1 44–16-1 [1]
1997 Mark Marquess (6) Stanford 21–0 1 45–20 [1]
1998 Mark Marquess (7) Stanford 22–8 1 42–14-1 [1]

Winners by school[edit]

School (year joined)a Winners Years
Arizona State (1978) 10 1981, 1982, 1984, 1988, 1993, 2000, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010
Oregon State (1964) 10 1982, 1983, 1986, 1993, 1994, 1997, 2005, 2006, 2011, 2013
Stanford (1959) 9 1983, 1985, 1987, 1990, 1994, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2003
Washington (1959) 9 1979, 1981, 1985, 1990, 1992, 1996, 1997, 1998, 2013
Washington State (1962) 7 1978, 1980, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1991, 1995
Southern California (1959) 5 1978, 1991, 1995, 1996, 2002
Arizona (1978) 4 1980, 1989, 1992, 2012
UCLA (1959) 4 1979, 1986, 2004, 2015
California (1959) 3 1980, 1992, 2001
Utah (1963) 1 2016
Portland Stateb (1982) 1 1984
Gonzagac (1982) 1 1994

Footnotes[edit]

  • a For purposes of this table, the "year joined" reflects the year that each team joined the conference now known as the Pac-12 as currently chartered. Although the Pac-12 claims the Pacific Coast Conference (PCC), founded in 1915, as part of its own history, that conference disbanded in 1959 due to infighting and scandal. That same year, five PCC members established the Athletic Association of Western Universities (AAWU) under a new charter that functions to this day. The Coach of the Year Award was not established until 1978, by which time all of the final members of the PCC except for Idaho were reunited in what was then the Pac-8.
  • b Portland State was an affiliate member of the Pac-10 from 1982-1998.
  • c Gonzaga was an affiliate member of the Pac-10 from 1982-1995.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg "Pac-12 Conference Baseball Record Book". Pac-12.com. Retrieved 1 February 2013.
  2. ^ "2012 Baseball All-Conference Team". Pac-12.com. Retrieved 2 February 2013.
  3. ^ Horowitz, Gary (29 May 2013). "Oregon State dominates all-Pac-12 baseball honors". Salem Statesman Journal. Retrieved 2 June 2013.
  4. ^ "UW's Meggs, Forgione Lead Huskies on Pac-12 Baseball Team". SeattleTimes.com. May 28, 2014. Archived from the original on June 28, 2014. Retrieved June 28, 2014.
  5. ^ "2015 All-Conference Baseball Team named". Pac-12 Conference. 27 May 2015.
  6. ^ "Pac-12 Announces Baseball All-Conference Honors". Pac-12 Conference. 2 June 2016.