Pacific Northwest University of Health Sciences

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Pacific Northwest University of Health Sciences
Pacific Northwest University of Health Sciences Logo.jpg
Type Private, non-profit
Established 2005
Budget $14.85 million[1]
President Keith Watson, DO
Dean Thomas A. Scandalis, DO
Academic staff
46[2]
Administrative staff
112[2]
495 (total)[3]
Location

Yakima, Washington,

USA
Coordinates: 46°36′20″N 120°27′23″W / 46.6055°N 120.4564°W / 46.6055; -120.4564
Campus Urban (mid-sized)[3] 64 acres[2]
Website pnwu.edu

Pacific Northwest University of Health Sciences (PNWU) is a private, non-profit medical school for osteopathic medicine located in Yakima, Washington, United States. Founded in 2005, the university's inaugural program was the first new medical school to open in the Pacific Northwest in sixty years. PNWU grants the Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (D.O.) degree, and graduated its first class of physicians in May 2012.

The Pacific Northwest University of Health Sciences College of Osteopathic Medicine is fully accredited by the American Osteopathic Association's Commission on Osteopathic College Accreditation.

History[edit]

The Pacific Northwest University of Health Sciences opened in 2005, after planning and fundraising to open a new osteopathic medical school in Washington State.[4] In 2007, PNWU received provisional accreditation. In 2008, the first courses began, and the university’s main building, Butler-Haney Hall, opened at a cost of $13 million.[5] In 2009, the university received a $400,000 federal grant to expand the College of Allied Health Sciences.[6]

In 2012, the inaugural class of 69 students graduated, earning the Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine degree.[7][8]

Mission[edit]

Pacific Northwest University of Health Sciences educates and trains health care professionals emphasizing service among rural and medically underserved communities throughout the Northwest.

Academics[edit]

The Pacific Northwest University of Health Sciences consists of a single college, the College of Osteopathic Medicine, which grants the Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (DO) degree. It is a four-year program. Years 1 and 2 of the DO program consist primarily of classroom-based learning, which focus on the basic sciences.

Years 3 and 4 of the DO program consist of clinical rotations in off-site communities.[9] The school currently has 18 sites for clinical rotations over the five-state region of Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington. Rather than all of the students receiving their clinical training in Yakima, students are required to go to many parts of the Northwestern United States to receive hands-on training. These sites include Fairbanks, Alaska; Blackfoot, Idaho; and Portland, Oregon among 15 others.

In 2015, PNWU was awarded a $1.75 million grant to develop an interprofessional education program from the Health Resources and Services Administration.[10]

A dual DO/MPH degree is offered in association with Nova Southeastern University College of Osteopathic Medicine.

Campus[edit]

The campus now consists of four buildings. Butler-Haney Hall is the center of the school where instruction and training occur, as well as housing the College of Osteopathic Medicine's Library. A new addition to Butler-Haney Hall was completed in 2013. Cadwell Center opened in January 2011, and provides additional rooms for study, classroom and research space.[11] A new University Conference Center is expected to be complete by the spring of 2015[12] and this building coupled with Iron Horse Lodge (Administration building) brings the total of four buildings to the growing PNWU campus. Starting in the fall of 2015 PNWU in conjunction with Washington State University will be opening a Pharmacy school which will be granting PharmD degrees.[13] A local business developer is in the finishing touches of completing a three story series of single,two and three bedroom apartments immediately to the south of campus.[14]

Students[edit]

PNWU Demographics[15]
Students
Asian 14%
Black/African American 0%
Hispanic 6%
Two or more 6%
White/Non-Hispanic 69%
Unknown 3%

A total of 430 students are in attendance at PNWU for the 2014–15 academic year. About 46 percent of PNWU students are female; 54 percent are male. About 69% are White/Non-Hispanic, 14% Asian/Pacific Islander, 6% Hispanic, 6% identify as two or more ethnicities, and the remaining students are of unknown ethnicity.[15]

Students at PNWU participate in a number of clubs on campus and an active student government association. Clubs on campus include: American College of Osteopathic Emergency Physicians (ACOEP), American College of Osteopathic Family Physicians (ACOFP), American Medical Student Association (AMSA). There is an active chapter of Sigma Sigma Phi, the osteopathic honors society.

Accreditation[edit]

The College of Osteopathic Medicine is accredited by the American Osteopathic Association's Commission on Osteopathic College Accreditation.[16]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Fiscal Year 2013 Revenues and Expenditures by Osteopathic Medical College" (PDF). AACOM. Retrieved 18 October 2015. 
  2. ^ a b c "Chief Advancement Officer: Overview" (PDF). Academic Search, Inc. Retrieved 6 July 2012. 
  3. ^ a b "Pacific Northwest University of Health Science, College of Osteopathic Medicine (PNWU-COM)" (PDF). American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine. pp. 72–73. 
  4. ^ Daily Sun News (15 April 2005). "New Medical School Planned for Yakima". Retrieved 14 November 2015. 
  5. ^ Ward, Leah Beth (August 9, 2009). "It's Year Two for the Pacific Northwest University of Health Sciences". Yakima Herald. Retrieved June 21, 2012. 
  6. ^ "Pacific Northwest University receives $400K federal grant". Yakima Herald. December 22, 2009. Retrieved April 9, 2012. 
  7. ^ Shannon McCann (May 9, 2012). "PNWU First Graduation". KVEW TV. Retrieved May 11, 2012. 
  8. ^ Molly Rosbach (May 12, 2012). "With first graduating class, Pacific Northwest University's medical dream is realized". Yakima Herald. Retrieved May 17, 2012. 
  9. ^ Central Washington Family Medicine Residency Program (2015). "Student Rotations". Community Health of Central Washington. Retrieved 14 November 2015. 
  10. ^ Rosbach, Molly (Jul 23, 2015). "PNWU lands grant to pursue 'team care'". Yakima Herald-Republic. 
  11. ^ "Cadwell Student Center Gift". Pacific Northwest University of Health Sciences. Archived from the original on 2012-02-29. Retrieved May 17, 2012. 
  12. ^ Rosbach, Molly (January 20, 2015). "New building a step forward in PNWU's master plan". Yakima Herald. Retrieved April 15, 2015. 
  13. ^ Rosbach, Molly (February 21, 2014). "PNWU adds WSU pharmacy program to Yakima campus". Yakima Herald. Retrieved April 15, 2015. 
  14. ^ Hoang, Mai (September 30, 2014). "Terrace Heights: 'The next big area'?". Yakima Herald. Retrieved April 15, 2015. 
  15. ^ a b "Pacific Northwest University of Health Sciences". College Navigator. U.S. Department of Education Institute of Education Sciences. 
  16. ^ "Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine" (PDF). AOA. Retrieved 17 August 2012. 

External links[edit]