Packard Eight

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Packard Eight
'30 Packard Deluxe Eight Roadster (MIAS '10).jpg
1930 De Luxe Eight Roadster
Overview
ManufacturerPackard
Production1930-35
AssemblyPackard Automotive Plant, Detroit, MI
Body and chassis
ClassLuxury car
Body style•2-door roadster
•2-door coupé
•2-door convertible Victoria
•4-door sedan
•4-door phaeton
•4-door dual-cowl phaeton & Sport Phaeton
town car
landau
LayoutFront engine, rear drive
RelatedLight Eight
120
Chronology
PredecessorPackard Six
SuccessorPackard 180

The Packard Eight was a luxury automobile produced by Packard between 1930 and 1938, and was a progression from the earlier Packard Six which was first introduced in 1913.[1]

Offered in three models, the Standard Eight, Custom Eight,[2] and De Luxe Eight,[3] it was powered by a low-compression aluminum-head[4] L-head inline eight[5] producing 90 bhp (67 kW)[6] (hence the name).[7] Packard ads bragged the engine "floated" on new rubber mounts.[8] Power would be upgraded to 110 hp (82 kW) in 1932[9] and 120 hp (89 kW) in 1933.[10]

The Eight offered optional (no extra cost)[11] four-speed synchromesh transmission.[12] Like other Packards of this era, it featured Ride Control, a system of dash-adjustable hydraulic shock absorbers.[13] The Eight also featured automatic chassis lubrication[14] and "shatterproof" glass.[15]

The Eight was available on several wheelbases: 127.5 in (3,240 mm) and 134.5 in (3,420 mm) for the 1930 Standard Eight,[16] 140 in (3,600 mm)[17] and 145.5 in (3,700 mm) for the De Luxe in 1931,[18] 130 in (3,300 mm) and 137 in (3,500 mm) for the 1932 Standard Eight.[19] For 1938, the Eight's wheelbase was stretched 7 in (180 mm) over 1937, and the body was also wider.[20]

It was advertised as a two-door roadster, two-door convertible & two-door convertible Victoria (both new for 1932),[21] phaeton,[22] four-door dual-cowl phaeton[23] & Sport Phaeton (a four-door four-seat dual-cowl phaeton new in 1932)[24] two-door coupé,[25] four-door sedan, landau,[26] town car,[27] and limousine. The Packard eight utilized a very rare swivel accelerator pedal, patented by Pat Au back in the early 1900s.

Production of the De Luxe Eight was less than ten per day.[28] It was available in eleven body styles.[29]

In 1930, the Eight was factory priced between US$2425 and US$2885 for the Standard Eight, US$3190 to US$3885 for the Custom Eight, and US$4585 to US$5350.[30] In 1932, prices ranged from US$2250 to US$3250[31] for the Standard Eight, while the De Luxe Eight started at US$3150.[32]

In 1931, Packard introduced the Continental Eight and the Continental Eight Deluxe, which were longer wheelbases of the Standard Eight. Period advertisements showed examples with body colored radiator grilles whereas the Standard models had chrome grilles.[33]

The 1932 Standard Eight was offered in thirteen body styles.[34] In 1933, base price of the Standard Eight was US$2150,[35] and was offered in fourteen body styles.[36] The 1933 De Luxe Eight started at US$3350.[37]

The five-passenger sedan was Packard's best-selling model for years.[38] This helped Packard become the best-selling luxury brand between 1924 and 1930,[39] as well as selling almost twice as many abroad as any other marque priced over US$2000.[40]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Old Car Advertising. Retrieved 19 September 2013.
  2. ^ Old Car Advertising. Retrieved 16 September 2013.
  3. ^ Old Car Advertising. Retrieved 16 September 2013.
  4. ^ Old Car Advertising. Retrieved 16 September 2013.
  5. ^ Old Car Advertising Retrieved 12 September 2013
  6. ^ Old Car Advertising. Retrieved 16 September 2013.
  7. ^ Old Car Advertising. Retrieved 16 September 2013. The same engine would be used in the 120, & remained in production until 1955.
  8. ^ Old Car Advertising. Retrieved 16 September 2013.
  9. ^ Old Car Advertising. Retrieved 16 September 2013.
  10. ^ Old Car Advertising. Retrieved 16 September 2013.
  11. ^ Old Car Advertising. Retrieved 16 September 2013.
  12. ^ Old Car Advertising; Old Car Advertising. Retrieved 16 September 2013.
  13. ^ Old Car Advertising. Retrieved 16 September 2013.
  14. ^ Old Car Advertising. Retrieved 16 September 2013.
  15. ^ Old Car Advertising. Retrieved 16 September 2013.
  16. ^ Old Car Advertising. Retrieved 16 September 2013.
  17. ^ Old Car Advertising. Retrieved 16 September 2013.
  18. ^ Old Car Advertising. Retrieved 16 September 2013.
  19. ^ Old Car Advertising. Retrieved 16 September 2013.
  20. ^ Old Car Advertising. Retrieved 5 October 2013.
  21. ^ Old Car Advertising; Old Car Advertising. Retrieved 16 September 2013.
  22. ^ Old Car Advertising. Retrieved 16 September 2013.
  23. ^ Old Car Advertising. Retrieved 16 September 2013.
  24. ^ Old Car Advertising. Retrieved 16 September 2013.
  25. ^ Old Car Advertising. Retrieved 16 September 2013.
  26. ^ Old Car Advertising. Retrieved 16 September 2013.
  27. ^ Old Car Advertising. Retrieved 16 September 2013.
  28. ^ Old Car Advertising. Retrieved 16 September 2013.
  29. ^ Old Car Advertising. Retrieved 16 September 2013.
  30. ^ Old Car Advertising. Retrieved 16 September 2013.
  31. ^ Old Car Advertising. Retrieved 16 September 2013.
  32. ^ Old Car Advertising. Retrieved 16 September 2013.
  33. ^ "Packard 1931". Classic Car Catalog. Retrieved 23 October 2017.
  34. ^ Old Car Advertising. Retrieved 16 September 2013.
  35. ^ Old Car Advertising. Retrieved 16 September 2013.
  36. ^ Old Car Advertising. Retrieved 16 September 2013.
  37. ^ Old Car Advertising. Retrieved 16 September 2013.
  38. ^ Old Car Advertising Retrieved 14 September 2013
  39. ^ Old Car Advertising. Retrieved 16 September 2013.
  40. ^ Old Car Advertising. Retrieved 16 September 2013.