Paco Herrera

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Paco Herrera
Paco Herrera Celta-Depor.JPG
Herrera in 2013
Personal information
Full name Francisco Herrera Lorenzo
Date of birth (1953-12-02) 2 December 1953 (age 63)
Place of birth Barcelona, Spain
Height 1.78 m (5 ft 10 in)
Playing position Midfielder
Club information
Current team
Valladolid (coach)
Youth career
1965–1972 Damm
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1972–1974 Sabadell 64 (5)
1974–1977 Sporting Gijón 44 (2)
1977–1979 Levante
1979–1986 Badajoz
Teams managed
1992–1993 Badajoz
1995 Badajoz
1998 Numancia
1998–1999 Mérida
2000 Numancia
2001–2002 Albacete
2002–2003 Poli Ejido
2003 Recreativo
2004–2006 Liverpool (assistant)
2009 Castellón
2010 Villarreal B
2010–2013 Celta
2013–2014 Zaragoza
2014–2015 Las Palmas
2016– Valladolid
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.
This name uses Spanish naming customs: the first or paternal family name is Herrera and the second or maternal family name is Lorenzo.

Francisco "Paco" Herrera Lorenzo (born 2 December 1953) is a Spanish retired footballer who played as a midfielder, and the current manager of Real Valladolid.

Playing career[edit]

Born in Barcelona, Catalonia, Herrera started playing professionally with CE Sabadell FC in his native region, appearing in two Segunda División seasons with the team. In 1974, the 20-year-old signed for Sporting de Gijón in La Liga, suffering relegation in his second year.

After a two-season spell with Levante UD, Herrera retired from football with CD Badajoz in 1986 at the age of 32, having played mainly for the Extremaduran in Segunda División B, the new third level created in 1977.

Coaching career[edit]

Herrera was connected to his last club Badajoz for several years as a manager, first coaching its youth sides and later acting as assistant. He would manage the first team in 24 games in two separate second division campaigns (18 in 1992–93 and six in 1994–95).

During three seasons, Herrera then worked in the second level, with CD Numancia and CP Mérida, the only complete one being 1998–99. He was sacked by the latter in late November 1999, following a 1–3 loss at former club Levante; the team eventually ranked sixth, being however demoted due to financial irregularities.

After two seasons in division two, with Albacete Balompié and Polideportivo Ejido (finishing in tenth and 13th position respectively), Herrera was appointed at Recreativo de Huelva in the same tier, being fired on 9 November 2003 after a 0–2 home loss against Andalusia neighbours Córdoba CF – the team had collected seven draws in 11 matches (plus two wins and as many losses). In the 2004 summer, he joined countryman Rafael Benítez's coaching staff in Liverpool, working as both assistant manager and chief scout for two years.[1]

Herrera left England in June 2006 and returned to his country, serving as director of football at RCD Espanyol for three seasons.[2] He left the club in February 2009 to manage CD Castellón, replacing Atlético Madrid-bound Abel Resino for the final 21 games of the campaign and leading the Valencians to the seventh place in the second division.

On 4 February 2010, Herrera replaced Juan Carlos Garrido at the helm of Villarreal CF' reserves, also in the second division, as Garrido had been promoted to the main squad following the sacking of Ernesto Valverde. In 2010–11 he continued working in level two, with Celta de Vigo, leading them to the promotion playoffs where they lost in the semi-finals against Granada CF, on penalties.

Herrera was also in charge as the Galicians returned to the top flight at the end of the 2011–12 season, as runners-up. He was relieved of his duties on 18 February 2013 after a 1–3 away loss against Getafe CF, however, with the club ranking third from bottom[3] but eventually saved.

Herrera was appointed at UD Las Palmas in the second division, on 3 July 2014.[4] He achieved promotion in his first season, with the team returning to the main category after 13 years.

On 19 October 2015, after a 0–4 defeat at Getafe CF that left the Canarians ranking second from the bottom, Herrera was sacked and replaced by Quique Setién.[5] On 7 June of the following year, he was named Real Valladolid manager.[6]

Managerial statistics[edit]

As of 26 February 2017
Team Nat Year Record
P W D L Win %
Badajoz[7][8] Spain 1992–93 41 22 7 12 53.66
Badajoz[9] Spain 1995 6 2 2 2 33.33
Numancia[10] Spain 1998 14 4 7 3 28.57
Mérida[11][12] Spain 1998–99 60 20 20 20 33.33
Numancia[13] Spain 2000 12 3 2 7 25.00
Albacete[14] Spain 2001–02 44 16 11 17 36.36
Poli Ejido[15] Spain 2002–03 43 12 16 15 27.91
Recreativo[16] Spain 2003 12 2 8 2 16.67
Castellón[17] Spain 2009 20 9 4 7 45.00
Villarreal B[18] Spain 2010 19 6 7 6 31.58
Celta[19][20][21] Spain 2010–13 119 53 29 37 44.54
Zaragoza[22] Spain 2013–14 31 10 9 12 32.26
Las Palmas[23][24] Spain 2014–15 58 27 16 15 46.55
Valladolid[25] Spain 2016– 31 13 7 11 41.94
Career Total 510 199 145 166 39.02

References[edit]

  1. ^ Paco plots bright future; Liverpool FC, 11 October 2005
  2. ^ Benitez wishes Herrera well as he leaves Reds; Liverpool FC, 9 June 2006
  3. ^ Abel Resino sustituye a Paco Herrera en el banquillo del Celta (Abel Resino replaces Paco Herrera in Celta bench); Celta de Vigo, 18 February 2013
  4. ^ Paco Herrera, nuevo entrenador de la UD Las Palmas (Paco Herrera, new UD Las Palmas coach); UD Las Palmas, 3 July 2014 (Spanish)
  5. ^ "Las Palmas sack Paco Herrera as manager, hire Quique Setien". ESPN FC. 19 October 2015. Retrieved 20 October 2015. 
  6. ^ "Paco Herrera, nuevo entrenador del Real Valladolid" [Paco Herrera, new manager of Real Valladolid]. Real Valladolid. 7 June 2016. Retrieved 12 June 2016. 
  7. ^ "Herrera: Francisco Herrera Lorenzo". BDFutbol. Retrieved 18 February 2016. 
  8. ^ "Herrera: Francisco Herrera Lorenzo". BDFutbol. Retrieved 18 February 2016. 
  9. ^ "Herrera: Francisco Herrera Lorenzo". BDFutbol. Retrieved 18 February 2016. 
  10. ^ "Herrera: Francisco Herrera Lorenzo". BDFutbol. Retrieved 18 February 2016. 
  11. ^ "Herrera: Francisco Herrera Lorenzo". BDFutbol. Retrieved 18 February 2016. 
  12. ^ "Herrera: Francisco Herrera Lorenzo". BDFutbol. Retrieved 18 February 2016. 
  13. ^ "Herrera: Francisco Herrera Lorenzo". BDFutbol. Retrieved 18 February 2016. 
  14. ^ "Herrera: Francisco Herrera Lorenzo". BDFutbol. Retrieved 18 February 2016. 
  15. ^ "Herrera: Francisco Herrera Lorenzo". BDFutbol. Retrieved 18 February 2016. 
  16. ^ "Herrera: Francisco Herrera Lorenzo". BDFutbol. Retrieved 18 February 2016. 
  17. ^ "Herrera: Francisco Herrera Lorenzo". BDFutbol. Retrieved 18 February 2016. 
  18. ^ "Herrera: Francisco Herrera Lorenzo". BDFutbol. Retrieved 18 February 2016. 
  19. ^ "Herrera: Francisco Herrera Lorenzo". BDFutbol. Retrieved 18 February 2016. 
  20. ^ "Herrera: Francisco Herrera Lorenzo". BDFutbol. Retrieved 18 February 2016. 
  21. ^ "Herrera: Francisco Herrera Lorenzo". BDFutbol. Retrieved 18 February 2016. 
  22. ^ "Herrera: Francisco Herrera Lorenzo". BDFutbol. Retrieved 18 February 2016. 
  23. ^ "Herrera: Francisco Herrera Lorenzo". BDFutbol. Retrieved 18 February 2016. 
  24. ^ "Las Palmas results". Sky Sports. Retrieved 18 February 2016. 
  25. ^ "Herrera: Francisco Herrera Lorenzo". BDFutbol. Retrieved 25 August 2016. (registration required (help)). 

External links[edit]