Painted treeshrew

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Painted treeshrew
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Scandentia
Family: Tupaiidae
Genus: Tupaia
Species: T. picta
Binomial name
Tupaia picta[2]
Thomas, 1892
Painted Treeshrew area.png
Painted treeshrew range

The painted treeshrew (Tupaia picta) is a treeshrew species of the family Tupaiidae.[2]

The first specimen was described by Oldfield Thomas and was part of a zoological collection from northern Borneo obtained by the British Museum of Natural History.[3]

Range and habitat[edit]

The painted treeshrew is endemic to Borneo and inhabits the forests of Brunei, Kalimantan, and Sarawak.[1] It usually lives at lower elevations, below 300 meters, but some specimens have been found at elevations hundreds of meters higher. Although the painted treeshrew is not a threatened species, it still suffers from loss of habitat.[1]

Description[edit]

The painted treeshrew's diet consists mainly of fruits and insects.

Appearance[edit]

The painted treeshrew has a body length of a little bit over 7 inches (18.5 centimeters) and a slightly shorter tail length, making it one of the smaller treeshrews in its genus. Most of its body is a rather dull color compared to other related species, consisting of mostly grayish olive, with a few yellow spots. However, its chin and chest are brighter colored, consisting of mostly orange and yellow. It also has a black stripe on its back.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Cassola, F. (2016). "Tupaia picta". The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN. 2016: e.T41499A22279973. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2016-2.RLTS.T41499A22279973.en. Retrieved 15 January 2018. 
  2. ^ a b Helgen, K.M. (2005). "Tupaia picta". In Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M. Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (3rd ed.). Johns Hopkins University Press. p. 108. ISBN 978-0-8018-8221-0. OCLC 62265494. 
  3. ^ a b Thomas, O. (1892). On some new Mammalia from the East-Indian Archipelago. The Annals and Magazine of Natural History 6 (9): 250–254.