Palawan bearded pig

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Palawan bearded pig
Coron - Calauit Wild Pig.jpg
Scientific classification edit
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Artiodactyla
Family: Suidae
Genus: Sus
Species:
S. ahoenobarbus
Binomial name
Sus ahoenobarbus
Huet, 1888

The Palawan bearded pig (Sus ahoenobarbus) is a pig species in the genus Sus endemic to the Philippines, where it occurs on the archipelago of islands formed by Balabac, Palawan, and the Calamian Islands.[1] It is 1 to 1.6 m (3.3 to 5.2 ft) in length, about 1 m (3.3 ft) tall and weigh up to 150 kg (330 lb).

Taxonomy[edit]

Until recently, it was considered a subspecies of the Bornean bearded pig (Sus barbatus), but at least under the phylogenetic species concept, it must be classified as a separate species. For its treatment under other (and more widely used) species concepts, more study is required, but the presently available information seems to argue for full species status in any case.[2]

Fossils[edit]

Fossils excavated in Palawan were identified as being of the Palawan bearded pig, deer, Philippine long-tailed macaques, tiger, small mammals, lizards, snakes and turtles. From the stone tools, besides the evidence for cuts on the bones, and the use of fire, it would appear that early humans had accumulated the bones.[3][4]

Borneo might have been connected to Palawan during the penultimate and previous glacial periods, judging from the molecular phylogeny of murids.[5] Remains of pigs were compared with the wild boar (Sus scrofa)and Palawanese wild boar (Sus ahoenobarbus). It is known that the wild boar was imported as a domesticate to the islands from mainland Southeast Asia during the late Holocene.[6][7][8][9][10]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Meijaard, E.; Widmann, P. (2017). "Sus ahoenobarbus". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN. 2017: e.T21177A44140029. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2017-3.RLTS.T21177A44140029.en. Retrieved 31 December 2018.
  2. ^ Lucchini, V.; Meijaard, E.; Diong, C. H.; Groves, C. P.; Randi, E. (2005). "New phylogenetic perspectives among species of South-east Asian wild pig (Sus sp.) based on mtDNA sequences and morphometric data". The Journal of Zoology. London. 266: 25–35. doi:10.1017/S0952836905006588.
  3. ^ Piper, P. J.; Ochoa, J.; Lewis, H.; Paz, V.; Ronquillo, W. P. (2008). "The first evidence for the past presence of the tiger Panthera tigris (L.) on the island of Palawan, Philippines: extinction in an island population". Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology. 264 (1–2): 123–127. Bibcode:2008PPP...264..123P. doi:10.1016/j.palaeo.2008.04.003.
  4. ^ Ochoa, J.; Piper, P. J. (2017). "Tiger". In Monks, G. (ed.). Climate Change and Human Responses: A Zooarchaeological Perspective. Springer. pp. 79–80. ISBN 978-9-4024-1106-5.
  5. ^ Van der Geer, A.; Lyras, G.; De Vos, J.; Dermitzakis, M. (2011). "15 (The Philippines); 26 (Carnivores)". Evolution of Island Mammals: Adaptation and Extinction of Placental Mammals on Islands. John Wiley & Sons. pp. 220–347.
  6. ^ Larson, G.; Dobney, K.; Albarella, U.; Fang, M.; Matisso-Smith, E.; Robins, J.; Lowden, S.; Finlayson, H.; Brand, T.; Willersley, E.; Rowley-Conwy, P.; Andersson, L.; Cooper, A. (2005). "Worldwide Phylogeography of wild boar reveals multiple centers of pig domestication". Science. 307 (5715): 1618–1621. Bibcode:2005Sci...307.1618L. doi:10.1126/science.1106927. PMID 15761152.
  7. ^ Larson, G.; Cucchi, T.; Fujita, M.; Matisoo-Smith, E.; Robins, J.; Anderson, A.; Rolett, B.; Spriggs, M.; Dolman, G.; Kim, T.-H.; Thi, N.; Thuy, D.; Randi, E.; Doehrty, M.; Due, R. A.; Bolt, R.; Griffin, B.; Morwood, M.; Piper, P.; Bergh, G.v.d.; Dobney, K. (2007). "Phylogeny and ancient DNA of Sus provides insight into Neolithic expansion in Island Southeast Asia and Oceania". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 104 (12): 4834–4839. Bibcode:2007PNAS..104.4834L. doi:10.1073/pnas.0607753104. PMC 1829225. PMID 17360400.
  8. ^ Dobney, K.; Cucchi, T.; Larson, G. (2008). "The pigs of Island Southeast Asia and the Pacific: new evidence for taxonomic status and human-mediated dispersal" (PDF). Asian Perspectives. 47 (1): 59–74. doi:10.1353/asi.2008.0009. JSTOR 42928732.
  9. ^ Cucchi, T.; Fujita, M.; Dobney, K. (2009). "New insights into pig taxonomy, domestication and human dispersal in Island Southeast Asia: molar shape analysis of Sus remains from Niah Caves, Sarawak". International Journal of Osteoarchaeology. 19 (4): 508–530. doi:10.1002/oa.974.
  10. ^ Piper, P. J.; Hung, H.-C.; Campos, F. Z.; Bellwood, P.; Santiago, R. (2009). "A 4,000 year old introduction of domestic pigs into the Philippine archipelago: implications for understanding routes of human migration into through Island Southeast Asia and Wallacea". Antiquity. 83: 687–695. doi:10.1017/S0003598X00098914.