Pamela Sneed

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Pamela Sneed is an American poet, performance artist,[1][2] actress, activist, and teacher. She is the author of two collections of poetry, Imagine Being More Afraid of Freedom Than Slavery (Henry Holt, 1998), and KONG And Other Works (Vintage Entity Press, 2009) and the chapbook, Lincoln (2014).[3] Her poems and monologues have also been anthologized in The 100 Best African American Poems,[4] edited by Nikki Giovanni. Recent publications include work in Best Monologues from Best American Short Plays[5] and Future Perfect.[6]

Sneed has held readings and performances at Center Stage at The Studio Museum, P.S. 122, Creative Time @ The Brooklyn Anchorage, Exit Art, Lincoln Center Ex-Teresa in Mexico City, The ICA London, The CCA in Glasgow, Scotland, The Green Room in Manchester, England, Literatur Werkstat in Berlin. She also headlined the New Work Now Festival at Joe’s Pub/Public Theater in 2005.

An out lesbian,[7] Sneed taught voice, performance and autobiographical writing at Long Island University, and currently teaches writing for solo performance and solo performance at Sarah Lawrence College.[citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Donovan, Carrie (24 October 1993). "Chaos Theory". The New York Times. p. 184. Retrieved 23 May 2011. Pamela Sneed, a performance poet, tops a man's leather bomber jacket, hip-tied sweater, pants and work boots with an overgrown newsboy cap. ( 
  2. ^ Rubin, Don; Solorzano, Carlo (2000-11-02). World Encyclopedia of Contemporary Theatre: The Americas. Taylor & Francis. pp. 435–. ISBN 978-0-415-22745-2. Retrieved 23 May 2011. 
  3. ^ "BGSQD: Book launch for Pamela Sneed's LINCOLN". thelodown. Retrieved 2016-02-06. 
  4. ^ "The 100 Best African American Poems". www.sourcebooks.com. Retrieved 2016-02-06. 
  5. ^ "Best Monologues from Best American Short Plays, Volume One, Best American Short Plays - Hal Leonard Online". www.halleonard.com. Retrieved 2016-02-06. 
  6. ^ "Publication Studio – Books – 253". www.publicationstudio.biz. Retrieved 2016-02-06. 
  7. ^ "Poet Pamela Sneed imagines freedom". Lesbian News, June 1998.