Pameungpeuk

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Pameungpeuk
Town
Pamengpeuk Beach
Pamengpeuk Beach
Pameungpeuk is located in Java
Pameungpeuk
Pameungpeuk
Location In Java
Coordinates: 7°38′0″S 107°43′0″E / 7.63333°S 107.71667°E / -7.63333; 107.71667Coordinates: 7°38′0″S 107°43′0″E / 7.63333°S 107.71667°E / -7.63333; 107.71667
Country  Indonesia
Province West Java
Regency Garut Regency
District District of Pameungpeuk
Time zone WIB (UTC+7)

Pameungpeuk is a small town near the coast of southwestern Java, Indonesia.[1] It is located 131 kilometres by road south of Bandung.[2]

Geography[edit]

The town is located several kilometres to the southeast of the small settlement of Cikelet, although it is Cikelet which is the administrative centre of the Cikelet Subdistrict of the Garut Regency which Pameungpeuk is administered by. The smaller settlements of Mancagahar lie to the southwest, Mandalakasih to the east and Paas along the road to the north.[2] The Kaso River flows past the village into the sea. A picturesque, twisting road is said to lead south from Garut with vegetable plots and tea plantations in the area.[3] A bus service runs along this road from Garut.[4] The road also connects the town to the Papandajan volcano.[5] Pameungpeuk Bay and the white sandy beaches in the coastal area are described as "beautiful" and "stunning".[6][7]

History[edit]

It contains the Puskesmas DTP Pameungpeuk Hospital and the Pameungpeuk Airfield and Space Center. The airfield was the home base of 4V1G-VI Coastal Patrol Squadron, with Lockheed 212 planes.[8] During World War II, Indonesian soldiers took prisoner three Dutch soldiers aboard a United States naval plane which made a forced landing yesterday at Pameungpeuk.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ 's Lands Plantentuin; Koninklijke Plantentuin Van Indonesie; Kebun Raya Indonesia (1956). Treubia: recueil de travaux zoologiques, hydrobiologiques et océanographiques. National Biological Institute, Museum Zoologicum Bogoriense. p. 282. Retrieved 10 December 2011. 
  2. ^ a b Maps (Map). Google Maps. 
  3. ^ Turner, Peter (May 1995). Indonesia: a Lonely Planet travel survival kit. Lonely Planet Publications. p. 240. ISBN 978-0-86442-263-7. Retrieved 10 December 2011. 
  4. ^ Periplus Editions (15 March 2001). Java. Tuttle Publishing. p. 136. ISBN 978-962-593-244-6. Retrieved 10 December 2011. 
  5. ^ Great Britain. Naval Intelligence Division; Stanley Henry Beaver (1944). Netherlands East Indies. Naval Intelligence Division. Retrieved 10 December 2011. 
  6. ^ Dalton, Bill (April 1985). Indonesia handbook. Moon Publications. pp. 171–2. ISBN 978-0-918373-04-5. Retrieved 10 December 2011. 
  7. ^ Backshall, Stephen (24 February 2003). Rough guide to Indonesia. Rough Guides. p. 169. ISBN 978-1-85828-991-5. Retrieved 10 December 2011. 
  8. ^ Beauchamp, Gerry (1 August 1985). Mohawks over Burma. Canada's Wings. ISBN 978-0-920002-18-6. Retrieved 10 December 2011. 
  9. ^ United States Naval Institute (1947). Naval Institute proceedings. p. 1528. Retrieved 10 December 2011.