Pan Island Expressway

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PIE-SG.svg
Pan Island Expressway
Lebuhraya Rentas Pulau
泛岛高速公路
தீவு விரைவுச்சாலை
Pan Island Expressway is labelled in single red line
Route information
Part of AH2[1]
Length42.8 km (26.6 mi)
Existed1966–present
HistoryFirst section completed in 1969,
last section completed in 1992
Major junctions
West endTuas (AYE)
 AYE, KJE, BKE, ORRS (Adam Road), NSC, CTE, KPE, TPE, ECP
East endChangi South (ECP)
Location
RegionsJurong, Bukit Timah, Toa Payoh, Geylang, Bedok, Tampines, Kallang, Tuas, Changi, Bukit Batok, Novena
Highway system
Expressways of Singapore
The PIE extension after Nanyang Flyover, looking towards Tuas.

The Pan Island Expressway (Abbreviated as: PIE) is the oldest and longest expressway in Singapore. Also, it is Singapore's longest road.[2] The expressway runs from the East Coast Parkway near Changi Airport in the east to Tuas in the west and has a total length of 42.8 kilometres (26.6 mi).

Initially conceived by the Public Works Department in the 1960s as part of road expansions for handling rising traffic volumes, work on the PIE commenced in 1964. The first section, Jalan Toa Payoh, was completed by 1969. Construction of the other segments of the expressway were carried out in the 1970s. The initial expressway, from Hong Kah Circle to the East Coast Parkway, was completed in June 1982. The PIE was then extended further westward to Tuas between 1991 and 1993. By the 1990s, the expressway was able to handle large amounts of traffic. The expressway and the interchanges along its route were expanded in the 1990s and 2000s to alleviate traffic congestion.

Route[edit]

The Pan Island Expressway measures 42.8 kilometres (26.6 mi) and is the longest expressway in Singapore.[3] Beginning at a junction with the East Coast Parkway near Changi Airport, the expressway runs northwest to intersect the Tampines Expressway.[4] It then curves southwest, passing through Tampines, Bedok and Geylang before intersecting the Kallang-Paya Lebar Expressway and curving northwest, before heading west and running along the southern edge of Toa Payoh.[5] From Toa Payoh, the expressway runs along the northern edge of Bukit Timah, curving southwest to meet the Bukit Timah Expressway, before heading west once again at Clementi Avenue 6. The PIE then travels along the northern edges of Clementi, Jurong East and Jurong West before ending at a junction with the Ayer Rajah Expressway at Tuas Road.[6]

History[edit]

Plans[edit]

The PIE was initially conceived by the Public Works Department as part of plans to expand Singapore's road network in the 1960s to cope with a predicted large rise in traffic volume over the next two decades.[7] It was the result of a four-year planning study conducted in 1967 by the Singaporean government and foreign planning consultants. The study was funded by the United Nations Development Programme.[8]

Intended to connect Singapore's satellite towns and industrial estates, it would act as the main connector between the parts of Singapore and would handle high traffic volumes.[9]

Construction[edit]

Construction of the PIE started in 1964 and took place in four phases.[10] Jalan Toa Payoh, a 2-mile (3.2 km) long segment of the expressway between Thomson Road and Woodsville Circus, was completed in June 1969[9] and the segment between Woodsville Circus and Jalan Eunos, named Jalan Kolan Ayer and Paya Lebar Way, was completed by 1970.[11] Work on the 8-mile (13 km) long section between Jalan Anak Bukit and Thomson Road began in March 1970.[12] During the construction of this section of the expressway, rocks had to be excavated near Adam Road.[13] Also, Kampong Chantek Bahru, off of Bukit Timah Road, was cleared to make way for the expressway.[14]

In January 1975, the section of the expressway between Jalan Eunos and Kallang Bahru was completed, and Jalan Kolam Bahru, between Kallang Bahru and Woodsville Circus, was improved to form a part of the expressway.[15] The section between Adam Road and Jalan Anak Bukit was opened in October 1976[16] and construction of the eastern part of the PIE, between Jalan Eunos and Changi Airport, started in 1976.[17]

Work was started in November 1977 to expand Whitley Road to six lanes, along with the construction of a grade-separated interchange to link it with the PIE.[18] The section of the expressway between Adam Road and Whitley Road was completed by 1978 and was opened to traffic in 1979. Construction from Jalan Anak Bukit to Boon Lay Road was started in 1978.[19] To connect this section to the rest of the PIE, a $15.2 million viaduct over Jalan Anak Bukit and Upper Bukit Timah Road was built.[11]

On 10 January 1981, the 10-kilometre (6.2 mi) segment of the PIE between Jalan Eunos and the East Coast Parkway was officially opened by Teh Cheang Wan, the then Minister of National Development, having cost $50 million to construct.[20] The section of the expressway between Upper Bukit Timah and Corporation Road was opened soon after on 31 January 1981 by Lee Yiok Seng, the Parlimentary Secretary of National Development at the time.[21] With the completion of two flyovers across Aljunied Road and Paya Lebar Road in June 1982—three months ahead of schedule—the PIE was fully opened.[22]

Impact and expansions[edit]

Upon its opening, the Pan Island Expressway had a positive impact on traffic flow in certain areas by alleviating traffic, as was reported by a preliminary Public Works Department study in October 1981.[23] From 1983 to 1984, two lanes, one in each direction, were added to the 16.4-kilometre (10.2 mi) section of the expressway between Mount Pleasant Road and Jalan Boon Lay.[24]

By the early 1990s, the expressway was handling considerable traffic but experienced traffic congestion during peak hours. To alleviate this, portions of the PIE, such as the Woodsville interchange and the intersection with the Central Expressway, were upgraded in May 1991 at a cost of $180 million.[25] In addition, service roads were constructed along the expressway near Toa Payoh and at the Woodsville interchange.[26]

Work began on an 8-kilometre (5.0 mi) extension of the expressway from Hong Kah Circle to Tuas in October 1991, with a northward realignment and extension of the expressway from Hong Kah Circle to Pioneer Road North. Intended to serve as a connection to the Jurong industrial estate and Jurong West, the extension cost $81.3 million[27] and was opened in December 1993.[28]

As the amount of traffic using the KJE and PIE to the Jurong industrial estate increased, the Land Transport Authority upgraded the stretch of the PIE between Tengah Flyover and Tuas Road to a four-lane dual carriageway from the previous three lanes. The work started in March 2004 and was finished in March 2006.[29]

Beginning in July 2011, the stretch of the PIE between Clementi Avenue 6 and Adam Road was widened; one lane was added to both sides of the expressway. As well, the Eng Neo, Chantek and Anak Bukit Flyovers were structurally expanded. The widened portions were progressively opened to traffic from July 2013.[30]

List of exits[edit]

No.[31] Eastbound exit to road (destinations)[31] Interchange[31] No.[31] Westbound exit to road (destinations)[31]
End of expressway (ECP) Changi I/C Start of expressway
1 Changi Airport
No exit 1 Changi South Avenue 3 (Changi Business Park and Singapore Expo)
2 Upper Changi Road North/East, Tampines Expressway (SLE), Changi Village and Pasir Ris Town Upper Changi I/C 2 Upper Changi Road North/East, Tampines Expressway (TPE), Changi Village and Pasir Ris Town
3B Tampines Street 31/Avenue 2 (Tampines New Town) Simei I/C 3A Simei Road (Simei New Town and Changi General Hospital)
4A Simei Avenue (Simei New Town, Changi General Hospital and Singapore Expo) Tampines South I/C 4B Tampines Avenue 5/Central (Tampines New Town) and Temasek Polytechnic
4B Tampines Avenue 5/Central (Tampines New Town) and Temasek Polytechnic
6 Bedok North Avenue 3 Bedok Reservoir I/C 6 Bedok North Avenue 3
8A Bedok North Road (Bedok New Town) Bedok North I/C No exit
8B Bedok North Road (Bedok Reservoir Road)
9 Jalan Eunos, Eunos Crescent, Eunos Link and Still Road Eunos I/C 9 Jalan Eunos, Eunos Crescent, Eunos Link and Still Road
11 Paya Lebar Road, Geylang Road and Airport Road Paya Lebar I/C 11 Paya Lebar Road, Geylang Road and Airport Road
13 Kallang Way, Sims Way, Kallang–Paya Lebar Expressway (KPE) Kallang I/C 12 Kallang Bahru, Bendemeer Road, Kallang–Paya Lebar Expressway (KPE)
No exit Woodsville Flyover 15A Central Expressway (City), (Balestier Road and Moulmein Road)
15 Central Expressway (Braddell Road, Ang Mo Kio, SLE), Upper Serangoon Road, MacPherson Road and Bendemeer Road Whampoa I/C 15B Central Expressway (Ang Mo Kio, SLE)
16A Kim Keat Link (Toa Payoh) Kim Keat I/C 16 Kim Keat Link (Toa Payoh)
No exit Toa Payoh South I/C 17 Jalan Datoh (Balestier Road), Thomson Road (Newton Road, Moulmein Road), Whitley Road (Catholic Junior College, Thomson Road)
17D Thomson Road (Balestier Road, Marymount Road), Lorong 2 Toa Payoh Thomson I/C 17C Thomson Road, Whitley Road (Catholic Junior College)
18 Onraet Road No exit
19 Stevens Road and Bukit Timah Road Mount Pleasant I/C 19 Whitley Road and Stevens Road
20B Lornie Highway and Lornie Road Adam I/C 20A Adam Road and Farrer Road
22 Eng Neo Avenue and Bukit Timah Road Eng Neo I/C 22 Eng Neo Avenue and Bukit Timah Road
24 Bukit Timah Expressway (Woodlands) and Dairy Farm Road Chantek I/C 24 Bukit Timah Expressway (Woodlands) and Dairy Farm Road
26B Upper Bukit Timah Road and Jalan Jurong Kechil Anak Bukit I/C 26A Clementi Road, Upper Bukit Timah Road, Jalan Jurong Kechil and Dunearn Road
No exit Clementi North I/C 27 Clementi Avenue 6, (Commonwealth Avenue West (Clementi New Town) and AYE), Toh Tuck Avenue, Bukit Batok East Avenue 3 and Old Toh Tuck Road
28 Toh Tuck Avenue, Bukit Batok East Avenue 3, Old Toh Tuck Road and Clementi Avenue 6 Toh Tuck I/C No exit
30 Toh Guan Road (Toh Guan Road East, Jurong East Central) Toh Guan I/C 30 Toh Guan Road (Toh Guan Road East, Jurong East Central)
31 Jurong Town Hall Road, Bukit Batok Road (Bukit Batok New Town, Jurong East New Town) Bukit Batok I/C 31 Jurong Town Hall Road, Bukit Batok Road (Bukit Batok New Town, Jurong East New Town)
No exit 32 Jurong Canal Drive (Jurong East New Town, Jurong West New Town)
34 Jurong West Avenue 2 (Corporation Road) Hong Kah I/C 34 Jurong Road, Jurong West Avenue 2 (Corporation Road)
35 Kranji Expressway (Choa Chu Kang, BKE) Tengah I/C 35 Kranji Expressway (Choa Chu Kang, BKE)
36 Jalan Bahar (Nanyang Technological University, Jurong West Avenue 3, Jurong West Avenue 5) Bahar I/C 36 Jalan Bahar (Nanyang Technological University, Jurong West Avenue 3, Jurong West Avenue 5)
38 Pioneer Road North (Nanyang Technological University, Jurong West Street 91) Nanyang I/C 38 Pioneer Road North (Nanyang Technological University, Jurong West Street 91)
40 Upper Jurong Road (Benoi Road), Pasir Laba Road (SAFTI) Pasir Laba I/C 40 Upper Jurong Road (Benoi Road), Pasir Laba Road (SAFTI)
Start of expressway Tuas I/C 41 Jalan Ahmad Ibrahim, Ayer Rajah Expressway
End of expressway (Tuas Road)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Asian Highway Database: AH Network in Member Countries Archived 25 January 2013 at the Wayback Machine – The United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific
  2. ^ The Book of Singapore Record Archived 18 October 2014 at the Wayback Machine
  3. ^ Lim, Yan Liang (25 August 2013). "Most traffic accidents in Singapore happen along PIE". The Straits Times. Singapore. Retrieved 11 February 2021.
  4. ^ "ECP 1KM" (Map). OneMap. Retrieved 11 February 2021.
  5. ^ "PIE" (Map). Google Maps. Retrieved 11 February 2021.
  6. ^ "PIE" (Map). Google Maps. Retrieved 11 February 2021.
  7. ^ "Super road for S'pore". The Straits Times. Singapore. 30 October 1967. p. 7. Retrieved 20 December 2020 – via NewspaperSG.
  8. ^ "Expressway opens next month". The Straits Times. Singapore. 18 December 1980. p. 18. Retrieved 23 December 2020 – via NewspaperSG.
  9. ^ a b "An express road link for the Singapore satellites". The Straits Times. Singapore. 10 June 1969. p. 7. Retrieved 20 December 2020 – via NewspaperSG.
  10. ^ "Speech by Mr Teh Cheng Wan, Minister for National Development, at the official opening of the Pan-Island Expressway between Jalan Eunos and East Coast Parkway on Saturday, 10 January 1981 at 11.00am" (PDF) (Press release). Singapore: Ministry of Culture. 10 January 1981. Retrieved 20 December 2020.
  11. ^ a b "Four phases of design and construction". The Straits Times. Singapore. 18 December 1980. p. 18. Retrieved 23 December 2020 – via NewspaperSG.
  12. ^ ""Pleasure cruise" motorway from Jurong to Kallang in two years". The Straits Times. Singapore. 9 January 1970. p. 4. Retrieved 20 December 2020 – via NewspaperSG.
  13. ^ "DANGER! Rock blasting for new expressway". The Straits Times. Singapore. 19 June 1972. p. 9. Retrieved 20 December 2020 – via NewspaperSG.
  14. ^ Lim, Ivan (2 February 1973). "500 want to know price to be paid for quitting". New Nation. Singapore. p. 3. Retrieved 23 December 2020 – via NewspaperSG.
  15. ^ "It's the new short cut". New Nation. Singapore. 16 September 1974. p. 2. Retrieved 23 December 2020 – via NewspaperSG.
  16. ^ "A view from the top..." New Nation. Singapore. 4 October 1976. p. 3. Retrieved 23 December 2020 – via NewspaperSG.
  17. ^ "Interchanges for eastern part of PIE to cost $34m". The Straits Times. Singapore. 11 January 1978. p. 15. Retrieved 23 December 2020 – via NewspaperSG.
  18. ^ "Whitley Road to go three lanes". The Straits Times. Singapore. 31 October 1977. p. 5. Retrieved 23 December 2020 – via NewspaperSG.
  19. ^ "When travel will be as easy as PIE". The Straits Times. Singapore. 7 July 1978. p. 6. Retrieved 23 December 2020 – via NewspaperSG.
  20. ^ Tan, Wee Him (10 January 1981). "Another piece of PIE is ready". The Straits Times. Singapore. p. 15. Retrieved 23 December 2020 – via NewspaperSG.
  21. ^ "East to west within an hour". New Nation. Singapore. 1 February 1981. p. 2. Retrieved 23 December 2020 – via NewspaperSG.
  22. ^ "All the way from Changi to Jurong via PIE". The Straits Times. Singapore. 10 June 1982. p. 10. Retrieved 23 December 2020 – via NewspaperSG.
  23. ^ "PIE eases flow of traffic". New Nation. Singapore. 30 October 1981. p. 10. Retrieved 23 December 2020 – via NewspaperSG.
  24. ^ "Wider expressway ready next year". The Straits Times. Singapore. 24 March 1983. p. 12. Retrieved 5 February 2021 – via NewspaperSG.
  25. ^ "$180 m project to upgrade PIE". The Business Times. Singapore. 4 May 1991. p. 2.
  26. ^ "PWD building service roads to easetraffic on PIE". The Straits Times. Singapore. 13 January 1992. p. 3.
  27. ^ "PIE will reach Tuas by '94". The Straits Times. Singapore. 8 January 1992. p. 3.
  28. ^ "PIE extension opens with better skid-resistance". The Straits Times. Singapore. 5 December 1993. p. 30.
  29. ^ "Widening of Pan Island Expressway (PIE)". Land Transport Authority. Retrieved 6 April 2006.
  30. ^ "Widening of PIE between Clementi Avenue 6 and Adam Road". Land Transport Authority. Retrieved 10 June 2017.
  31. ^ a b c d e "OneMap" (Map). OneMap. Singapore: Singapore Land Authority. Retrieved 12 May 2021.

External links[edit]