Panemeria tenebrata

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Small yellow underwing
Panemeria.tenebrata.jpg
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Class: Insecta
Order: Lepidoptera
Family: Noctuidae
Genus: Panemeria
Species: P. tenebrata
Binomial name
Panemeria tenebrata
(Scopoli, 1763)

Panemeria tenebrata, the small yellow underwing, is a species of moth of the family Noctuidae. It is found in Europe but is missing in northern Scandinavia, in Portugal, in central and southern Spain, as well as on most Mediterranean islands, except Sicily. In the east, the range extends to the Ural mountains, but the east distribution limits are still insufficiently known. Occurrence in Asia Minor is uncertain, but it is known from Jordan and Israel.

Technical description and variation[edit]

For a key to the terms used, see Glossary of entomology terms.

The wingspan is 19–22 mm. Forewing dark fuscous, varied with red brown and with a sprinkling of pale grey scales; inner and outer lines indistinctly darker; a dentate, cloudy dark fuscous median shade; a darker shade precedes and defines the subterminal hue; hindwing blackish, with a deep yellow outer fascia not reaching inner margin; in the ab. obscura Spul. the black borders of the hindwing are wider and the white band smaller.[1]

Biology[edit]

The moth flies from April to July depending on the location. It prefers sunny weather.

Larva light green; dorsal line deep green; subdorsal lines whitish, edged with darker; spiracular line more yellowish, edged with dark green above: head pale green. The larvae feed on the flowers and seeds of Cerastium and Stellaria.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Seitz, A. Ed., 1914 Die Großschmetterlinge der Erde, Verlag Alfred Kernen, Stuttgart Band 3: Abt. 1, Die Großschmetterlinge des palaearktischen Faunengebietes, Die palaearktischen eulenartigen Nachtfalter, 1914
  2. ^ "Robinson, G. S., P. R. Ackery, I. J. Kitching, G. W. Beccaloni & L. M. Hernández, 2010. HOSTS - A Database of the World's Lepidopteran Hostplants. Natural History Museum, London.". 

External links[edit]