Pansexual pride flag

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Pansexual pride flag.

The pansexual pride flag was designed as a symbol for the pansexual community to use. The flag has been found on various internet sites since mid-2010.[1][2] It is similar to the LGBT flag, which is used as a symbol for the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and anyone else in the community. The flag is used to increase visibility and recognition for the pansexual community, and to distinguish it from bisexuality.[3] It is also used to indicate that pansexuals have sexual attractions and relationships with people of different genders and sexualities.[4] The theory of pansexuality aims to challenge existing prejudices, which can cause judgment, ostracism, and serious disorders within society.[5]

Design[edit]

The pansexual flag consists of three colored horizontal bars: pink, yellow, and blue.[6][7] The blue portion of the flag represents sexual attraction to those who identify within the male spectrum (regardless of biological sex), the pink represents sexual attraction to those who identify within the female spectrum (regardless of biological sex), and the yellow portion, found in between the blue and pink portions, represents sexual attraction to non-binary people, such as those who are androgynous,[4] agender, bigender and genderfluid.[8][9][10][11][12]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Pansexual Pride Flag, 2010-10-08, archived from the original on 2011-11-03.
  2. ^ "Do You Have a Flag?". 9 November 2012. Retrieved 17 July 2014.
  3. ^ Petronzio, Matt. "A Storied Glossary of Iconic LGBT Flags and Symbols". MashableUK. Retrieved 17 January 2015.
  4. ^ a b STOP-Homophobia (2017). "What is Pansexual?". Retrieved 3 June 2018.
  5. ^ Boom, Peter. "The Philosophy of pansexuality". European Federation of Sexology. Retrieved February 12, 2016.
  6. ^ "Pansexual Pride Day". Shenandoah University. Retrieved 17 July 2014.
  7. ^ "Gender Identity/Expression and Sexual Orientation Resource Center - Pansexuality". Washington State University. Archived from the original on 26 July 2014. Retrieved 17 July 2014.
  8. ^ "A field guide to Pride flags". 27 June 2013. Retrieved 17 July 2014.
  9. ^ "A Storied Glossary of Iconic LGBT Flags and Symbols". 13 June 2014. Retrieved 17 July 2014.
  10. ^ "Cantú Queer Center - Sexuality Resources". Retrieved 17 July 2014.
  11. ^ Pansexual Pride Flag, 2010-08-11, archived from the original on 2011-08-24.
  12. ^ "Mashable publishes an up-to-date compilation of LGBT flags and symbols". GLAAD. 16 June 2014. Retrieved 17 July 2014.