Paolo Costagli

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Paolo Costagli
Born1966
Italy
EducationGemological Institute of America (1989), Collegio Alla Querce (1985)
OccupationJewellery designer
Years active1991 – present[1]
Websitepaolocostagli.com

Paolo Costagli (born in 1966) is an Italian jewellery designer and gemologist. Costagli is known for using hard-to-find colored gemstones,[2] sophisticated color combinations[citation needed] and strong architectural shapes.[citation needed]

Early life[edit]

Paolo Costagli studied at the private school Collegio Alla Querce in Florence. After his military service[3] at the age of 21 he moved to the United States[4] where he took the Graduate Gemologist course at the Gemological Institute of America in Santa Monica, California.[5][6][7] After getting his gemologist degree Costagli went to Muzo, Colombia and worked for several months at the emerald mines.[8] He then moved to Bogotá and worked there for a Japanese export company specializing in emeralds.[8]

Career[edit]

He returned to the United States and moved to New York City in 1991[1][7] and in 1993 started his own gem and antique jewelry business specializing in colored stones.[8] He was buying signed vintage pieces from known jewelry designers and selling them in the trade.[4] He learned the craft of jewelry making from the designers like René Boivin, Suzanne Belperron and Raymond Templier.[9] In 1995 he started to design his own jewels.[4][8] His early collections include Florentine (2001) inspired by the vivid colors seen in the Giardino dell'Iris garden in Florence,[9][10] and Brilliante (2003), inspired by a tile pattern at the Doge's Palace in Venice.[11][12]

In 2008 his Brillante bracelet was included into the permanent collection of Museum of Arts and Design.[13]

In 2018 his company started a curated online trunk show for the first time. Now clients all over the world have access to the products and information behind it.[14]

He is based in New York City on Madison Avenue.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Shopping: Paolo Costagli". New York. Archived from the original on 3 July 2010. Retrieved 15 November 2017.
  2. ^ Jill Newman (15 September 2013). "Paolo Costagli's Treasure Hunt". Robb Report. Archived from the original on 18 November 2017. Retrieved 18 November 2017.
  3. ^ Dukes, Tanya (8 January 2014). "Designing Lives: Paolo Costagli". INSTOREMAG.COM. Retrieved 13 February 2020.
  4. ^ a b c Tanya Dukes. "Designing Lives: Paolo Costagli". Instore, January/February 2014. Archived from the original on 20 November 2017. Retrieved 20 November 2017.
  5. ^ Douglas Gollan (7 December 2012). "Paolo Costagli". elitetraveler.com. Archived from the original on 14 February 2013. Retrieved 15 November 2017.
  6. ^ Nicolle Keogh (22 October 2012). "City-Inspired Pieces by Italian Jeweler Paolo Costagli". justluxe.com. Archived from the original on 1 November 2012. Retrieved 15 November 2017.
  7. ^ a b c "#SIJE2015 – A Warm Welcome to Paolo Costagli World of Significant Designs". Champagne Gem. 10 September 2015. Retrieved 13 February 2020.
  8. ^ a b c d Jill Newman (1 August 2007). "Jewelry: Treasure Hunter". Robb Report. Archived from the original on 17 November 2017. Retrieved 25 November 2017.
  9. ^ a b Divia Harilela (25 June 2012). "Five minutes with Jewellery Designer Paolo Costagli". the-dvine.com. Archived from the original on 1 July 2012. Retrieved 23 November 2017.
  10. ^ "Peridot & Pink Sapphire "Florentine" Bracelet". betteridge.com. Archived from the original on 23 November 2017. Retrieved 23 November 2017.
  11. ^ "Serious Impact: The ForbesLife Ultimate Luxury Gift Guide". artfixdaily.com. 5 December 2012. Archived from the original on 23 November 2017. Retrieved 23 November 2017.
  12. ^ Åse Anderson (15 September 2013). "Pixelated jewels have flown the games console to conquer our hearts". thejewelleryeditor.com. Archived from the original on 18 November 2017. Retrieved 18 November 2017.
  13. ^ "Paolo Costagli (Italian-American): Brillante Bracelet". Museum of Arts and Design. Archived from the original on 16 November 2017. Retrieved 16 November 2017.
  14. ^ "Paolo Costagli New York's First Online Trunk Show". PRWeb. Retrieved 13 February 2020.

External links[edit]