Paolo Costagli

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Paolo Costagli
Born 1966
Florence, Italy
Residence New York City, New York, U.S.
Education Gemological Institute of America (1989), Collegio Alla Querce (1985)
Occupation Jewellery designer
Years active 1991 – present[1]
Website paolocostagli.com

Paolo Costagli (born in 1966) is an Italian jewellery designer and gemologist. Costagli is known for using hard-to-find colored gemstones,[2] sophisticated color combinations[3] and strong architectural shapes.[3]

Early life[edit]

Paolo Costagli was born in 1966 in Florence.[3] He studied at the private school Collegio Alla Querce in Florence. After his military service[further explanation needed] he moved to the United States[4] where he took the Graduate Gemologist course at the Gemological Institute of America.[5][6] After getting his gemologist degree Costagli went to Muzo, Colombia and worked for several months at the emerald mines.[7][3] He then moved to Bogotá and worked there for a Japanese export company specializing in emeralds.[7]

Career[edit]

He returned to the United States in 1991[1] and in 1993 started his own gem and antique jewelry business specializing in colored stones.[7] He was buying signed vintage pieces from known jewelry designers and selling them in the trade.[4] He learned the craft of jewelry making from the designers like Rene Boivin, Suzanne Belperron and Raymond Templier.[8] In 1995 he started to design his own jewels.[4][7] His early collections include Florentine (2001) inspired by the vivid colors seen in the Giardino dell'Iris garden in Florence,[3][8][9] and Brilliante (2003), inspired by a tile pattern at the Doge's Palace in Venice.[10][3][11]

In 2008 his Brillante bracelet was included into the permanent collection of Museum of Arts and Design.[12]

He is based in New York City.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Shopping: Paolo Costagli". New York. Archived from the original on 2010-07-03. Retrieved 2017-11-15.
  2. ^ Jill Newman (2013-09-15). "Paolo Costagli's Treasure Hunt". Robb Report. Archived from the original on 2017-11-18. Retrieved 2017-11-18.
  3. ^ a b c d e f Kati Vereshaka (2014-05-08). "Paolo Costagli Finds the Jewel in the Stone". Epoch Times. Archived from the original on 2016-12-01. Retrieved 2017-11-15.
  4. ^ a b c Tanya Dukes. "Designing Lives: Paolo Costagli". Instore, January/February 2014. Archived from the original on 2017-11-20. Retrieved 2017-11-20.
  5. ^ Douglas Gollan (2012-12-07). "Paolo Costagli". elitetraveler.com. Archived from the original on 2013-02-14. Retrieved 2017-11-15.
  6. ^ Nicolle Keogh (2012-10-22). "City-Inspired Pieces by Italian Jeweler Paolo Costagli". justluxe.com. Archived from the original on 2012-11-01. Retrieved 2017-11-15.
  7. ^ a b c d Jill Newman (2007-08-01). "Jewelry: Treasure Hunter". Robb Report. Archived from the original on 2017-11-17. Retrieved 2017-11-25.
  8. ^ a b Divia Harilela (2012-06-25). "Five minutes with Jewellery Designer Paolo Costagli". the-dvine.com. Archived from the original on 2012-07-01. Retrieved 2017-11-23.
  9. ^ "Peridot & Pink Sapphire "Florentine" Bracelet". betteridge.com. Archived from the original on 2017-11-23. Retrieved 2017-11-23.
  10. ^ "Serious Impact: The ForbesLife Ultimate Luxury Gift Guide". artfixdaily.com. 2012-12-05. Archived from the original on 2017-11-23. Retrieved 2017-11-23.
  11. ^ Åse Anderson (2013-09-15). "Pixelated jewels have flown the games console to conquer our hearts". thejewelleryeditor.com. Archived from the original on 2017-11-18. Retrieved 2017-11-18.
  12. ^ "Paolo Costagli (Italian-American): Brillante Bracelet". Museum of Arts and Design. Archived from the original on 2017-11-16. Retrieved 2017-11-16.

External links[edit]