Paolo Emilio Cesi

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Paolo Emilio Cesi
Cardinal-Deacon of Sant'Eustachio
ChurchCatholic Church
In office1534-1537
PredecessorAlessandro Farnese (cardinal)
SuccessorAgostino Trivulzio
Orders
RankCardinal-Deacon
Personal details
Born1481
Terni, Umbria
Died5 Aug 1537 (age 56)
Rome, Italy
NationalityItalian

Paolo Emilio Cesi (1481–1537) was an Italian Roman Catholic cardinal.[1][2]

Biography[edit]

Paolo Emilio Cesi was born in Terni, Umbria in 1481, the eldest of twelve children born to Roman noble Angelo Cesi and Francesca Cardoli.[1] His younger brother, Federico Cesi, also became a cardinal.[1] After finishing school, he moved to Rome where he served as a notary at the Fifth Council of the Lateran, a canon of Santa Maria Maggiore, a protonotary apostolic, and a regent of the Chancery of Apostolic Briefs.[1]

He was named cardinal deacon by Pope Leo X in the consistory of July 1, 1517.[1][2] On July 6, 1517, he received the red hat and the deaconry of San Nicola in Carcere.[1][2] He participated in the papal conclave of 1521-22 that elected Pope Adrian VI.[1][2] He was the administrator of the see of Lund from February 6, 1520 to July 12, 1521; administrator of the see of Sion from November 12, 1522 until September 8, 1529; and administrator of the see of Todi from June 1, 1523 until he resigned in favor of his brother Federico.[1][2] Pope Adrian VI named him one of the judges in the case against Cardinal Francesco Soderini.[1] He participated in the papal conclave of 1523 that elected Pope Clement VII.[1][2] He was administrator of the see of Narni from May 20, 1524 to June 1, 1524; administrator of the see of Civita Castellana from April 7, 1525 until his death; and administrator of the see of Cervia from 1525 until March 23, 1528.[1][2]

He lost all of his goods during the Sack of Rome (1527).[1]

In the absence of the pope, he was governor of Rome in 1529.[1] From October 6, 1529 until October 21, 1530, he was administrator of the see of Massa Marittima.[1][2] He opted for the deaconry of Sant'Eustachio on September 5, 1534.[1][2] Under Pope Clement VII, he was Prefect of the Apostolic Signatura.[1] He was also the cardinal protector of the Duchy of Savoy, and vice-protector of the Kingdom of England and the Kingdom of Ireland.[1] He participated in the papal conclave of 1534 that elected Pope Paul III.[1][2] On August 23, 1535, the new pope made him a member of the commission on reform of the Roman Curia.[1]

He died in Rome on August 5, 1537.[1] He is buried in the Basilica di Santa Maria Maggiore.[1] While bishop, he was the principal co-consecrator of Cristoforo Numai, Bishop of Isernia.[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u Miranda, Salvador. "CESI, Paolo Emilio (1481-1537)". The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church. Florida International University.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "Paolo Emilio Cardinal Cesi " Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved July 4, 2017
Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
Carlo Domenico del Carretto
Cardinal-Deacon of San Nicola in Carcere
1517–1534
Succeeded by
Íñigo López de Mendoza y Zúñiga
Preceded by
Administrator of Lund
1520–1521
Succeeded by
Preceded by
Matthäus Schiner
Administrator of Sion
1522–1529
Succeeded by
Adrian von Riedmatten
Preceded by
Constantin Eruli
Administrator of Todi
1523
Succeeded by
Federico Cesi (cardinal)
Preceded by
Carlo Soderini
Administrator of Narni
1524
Succeeded by
Bartolomeo Cesi (bishop)
Preceded by
Pietro de Flisco
Administrator of Cervia
1525–1528
Succeeded by
Octavio de Cesi
Preceded by
Francesco Franceschini
Administrator of Civita Castellana e Orte
1525–1537
Succeeded by
Pomponio Cecci
Preceded by
Francesco Peroschi
Administrator of Massa Marittima
1529–1530
Succeeded by
Girolamo Ghianderoni
Preceded by
Andrea della Valle
Archpriest of the Basilica di Santa Maria Maggiore
1534–1537
Succeeded by
Alessandro Farnese (cardinal)
Preceded by
Alessandro Farnese (cardinal)
Cardinal-Deacon of Sant'Eustachio
1534–1537
Succeeded by
Agostino Trivulzio