Paolo Romani

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Paolo Romani
Paolo Romani datisenato 2018.jpg
Minister of Economic Development
In office
4 October 2010 – 16 November 2011
Prime MinisterSilvio Berlusconi
Preceded byClaudio Scajola
Succeeded byCorrado Passera
Member of the Senate
Assumed office
15 March 2013
Member of the Chamber of Deputies
In office
15 April 1994 – 15 March 2013
Personal details
Born (1947-09-18) 18 September 1947 (age 72)
Milan, Italy
NationalityItalian
Political partyCambiamo! (since 2019)
Other political
affiliations
PLI (until 1994)
Forza Italia (1994-2009)
PdL (2009-2013)
Forza Italia (2013-2019)

Paolo Romani (born 18 September 1947) is an Italian politician, publisher, journalist and former minister of economic development.

Early life[edit]

Romani was born in Milan on 18 September 1947.[1] He has a high school diploma.[1]

Career[edit]

Romani worked as television executive in Italy.[2] He became a member of Silvio Berlusconi’s Forza Italia party in 1994.[3] In 2008, he was elected to the Italian parliament.[1] He served as deputy minister of communications from 30 June 2009 to 4 October 2010.[1]

Romani was appointed minister of the economic development to the fourth Berlusconi cabinet on 4 October 2010.[3] He replaced Silvio Berlusconi as minister who had led the ministry since May 2010.[3] Romani's term ended when he was replaced by Corrado Passera as minister on 16 November 2011.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "The Minister - Paolo Romani (English version)". Ministry of the economic development. Retrieved 22 December 2012.
  2. ^ Dinmore, Guy (5 October 2010). "Berlusconi minister accused of conflict of interest". Financial Times. Retrieved 30 March 2013.
  3. ^ a b c Donovan, Jeffrey (5 October 2010). "Romani Sworn in as Industry Minister Five Months After Scajola's Departure". Bloomberg. Retrieved 22 December 2012.
  4. ^ "Italy's Unelected Prime Minister Monti Unveils Cabinet Line up Devoid of Any Elected Politicians". The Information Daily. 16 November 2011. Retrieved 22 December 2012.